file and printing sharing for Windows

file and printing sharing for Windows
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23_275191-bk04ch03.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 381 Chapter 3: Allowing Sharing of Files and More In This Chapter  Enabling file and printing sharing for Windows and Macintosh  Discovering your sharing options in Windows  Making Windows and Macs talk  Opening the sharing gates of firewalls ust think of it: You can sit with your laptop in your living room and fetch a J file from the PC in your den, kitchen, or home office without even having to stand up, much less go to another computer. And if you need to print something from that very same laptop but your printer is connected to the PC in your home office, you can just go ahead and send the file to the printer, again without even having to move. How cool is that? Even cooler still is the fact that if one of your computers is a Mac and the rest are Windows PCs (or vice versa), no problem You can actually exchange files and share resources between your Mac and Windows computers. All this happens through a fea- ture called sharing. But before you can share folders and printers among the computers on your network, you have to first take your computers to kindergarten and teach them how to share. This chapter tells you how to enable sharing on your operating system, whether Windows, Mac, or Ubuntu (or all), and get your firewall to cooperate in letting shared files and resources pass through it. Telling Windows It’s Okay to Share In Windows, the File and Printer Sharing feature is what lets you share, view, and access your resources on the network. This feature is enabled by default in Windows; however, before you start trying to share, you may want to double-check that the features are on — and that someone didn’t get bored or curious and mess with the settings. First you must open the Properties window for the network adapter you want to enable sharing for. Here’s how to do this in Windows 2000: 1. Choose Start➪Settings➪Network and Dial-up Connections. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/23_275191-bk04ch03.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 382 382 Telling Windows It’s Okay to Share 2. In Network and Dial-up Connections, right-click the network adapter that you’re using on this computer and select Properties. If you’re using Windows XP, here’s how to open the Properties window for a network adapter: 1. Double-click your adapter’s icon in the system tray. 2. In the Network Connection Status window, click the Properties tab. Here’s how to open the Properties window for a network adapter in Windows Vista: 1. Click the network icon in the system tray. 2. Select Network and Sharing Center. 3. In the Tasks section on the left, select Manage Network Connections. 4. Right-click the adapter that your computer is using and select Properties. If User Account Control is active, click Continue on the prompt. After you have the Network Connection Properties window up for your adapter, here’s how you can verify that sharing is enabled: 1. Select the File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks option. Figure 3-1 shows this option. Figure 3-1: Make sure this item is checked so that you can share files and printers. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Allowing Sharing of Files and More 23_275191-bk04ch03.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 383 383 Telling Windows It’s Okay to Share If this item isn’t listed, you can add it: Click the Install button, select Service, click Add, choose File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks, and click OK. 2. Select the Client for Microsoft Networks option. If this item isn’t listed, you can add it: click the Install button, select Service, click Add, choose File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks, and click OK. 3. Click OK. In Windows Vista, you have more settings you must enable before sharing is active: 1. Click the network icon in the system tray. 2. Click Network and Sharing Center. 3. Enable Network Discovery and File Sharing by clicking the down arrow to the far right of the items in the Sharing and Discovery sec- tion (which expands its settings) and by clicking the Turn On Network Discovery and Turn On File Sharing radio buttons. These settings are under the Sharing and Discovery section, pointed out in Figure 3-2. Book IV Chapter 3 Figure 3-2: Windows Vista’s sharing and discovery settings. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/23_275191-bk04ch03.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 384 384 Your Sharing Options in Windows In Windows Vista, the first time you connect to a network, you must classify its type: Home, Work, or Public. This classification helps prevent unautho- rized access of your documents when you’re on public hotspots and other untrustworthy networks. However, when you want to share your resources; you should classify your network as a Home network. You can also change your network classification at anytime via the Network and Sharing Center. In order for Windows XP computers to show up on the new network map fea- ture in Windows Vista, you must install the Link Layer Topology Discovery (LLTD) Responder feature on each of the XP computers. You can download this feature from the Microsoft site by visiting www.microsoft.com/ downloads/, searching for LLTD, and following the directions to download and install it. Your Sharing Options in Windows Windows offers two main ways for you to share resources: ✦ Simple File Sharing: As it sounds, this is a simple way to share. The folders and printers you share are available to anyone on the network. ✦ Controlled access: This method lets you specify exactly who on your network can access your shared resources and what they can do with them. The sharing methods vary between the different Windows versions: ✦ Windows 2000: Supports only controlled access. ✦ Windows XP Home Edition: Supports only Simple File Sharing. ✦ Windows XP Professional: Supports Simple File Sharing, which comes enabled by default, but can be disabled to activate controlled access. ✦ Windows Vista: Supports controlled access (with password protection), which comes enabled by default, but can be disabled to activate Simple File Sharing. In Windows XP Professional, here’s how you can toggle between the Simple File Sharing and controlled access sharing methods: 1. Choose My Computer➪Tools➪Folder Options. The Folder Options dialog box opens. 2. Click the View tab and then deselect or select the Use Simple File Sharing option. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Allowing Sharing of Files and More 23_275191-bk04ch03.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 385 385 Setting Up Sharing for the Mac 3. Click OK. The sharing method you choose is enabled. In Windows Vista, you can disable the Password Protected Sharing feature that’s on by default. To do so, follow these steps: 1. Click the network icon in the system tray. 2. In the menu that pops up, select Network and Sharing Center. The Network and Sharing Center opens. 3. In the Sharing and Discovery section, click the down arrow to the far right of the Password Protected Sharing option, and then click the Turn Off Password Protected Sharing radio button. If the option is indeed enabled already, the radio button is labeled On and is filled in with green. If the option is already disabled, the radio button is called Off and is gray. You can’t really force Windows Vista to use just the Simple File Sharing fea- ture, but disabling password protection makes it one step closer to it. Even with password protection off, you can still specify which users can access your resources and what they can do if you want. Setting Up Sharing for the Mac Your Mac computers can also share their files and printers on the network. Follow these steps to enable sharing from a Mac OS X Tiger or Leopard computer with other Macs on your network: 1. Click the Apple icon on the menu bar. 2. Choose System Preferences. 3. In the System Preferences window, double-click the Sharing icon. Book IV Chapter 3 4. In the Sharing window, select the checkboxes next to the File Sharing (Personal File Sharing in Tiger) and Printer Sharing options, as shown in Figure 33. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/23_275191-bk04ch03.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 386 386 Sharing Among Windows and Macs Figure 3-3: Sharing enabled in Mac OS X Leopard. Sharing Among Windows and Macs If you have Mac OS X Tiger or Leopard, you can host shared files and print- ers among Windows PCs on your network. After you make the necessary set- ting changes, people in your home using Windows can access the shared resources of the Mac computer as they normally can through My Network Places or Network. They are prompted for a username and password from one of the Mac accounts you choose to set up with the Windows Sharing feature. If you intend to view the shared resources of a Mac with Windows 98, make sure that your Windows username matches your Mac OS X account’s short name. If needed, you’ll need to create a new Windows account that matches. Here’s how to do the magic in Mac OS X Tiger: 1. Click the Apple icon on the menu bar. 2. Choose System Preferences. 3. In the System Preferences window, double-click the Sharing icon. 4. In the Sharing window, select the checkbox next to the Windows Sharing option. 5. Click the Accounts button. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Allowing Sharing of Files and More 23_275191-bk04ch03.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 387 387 Putting Ubuntu into the Network Mix 6. In the drop-down window that appears, select the checkbox next to the account(s) you want to use to connect to the Mac computer from your Windows computers, enter the password for the account into the dialog box that appears, and click OK. When you’ve selected the desired accounts, click Done. If you’re using Mac OS X Leopard, here’s how to enable Windows computers to access your Mac’s shared resources: 1. Click the Apple icon on the menu bar. 2. Select System Preferences. 3. In the System Preferences window, double-click the Sharing icon. 4. In the Sharing window, select the checkbox next to the File Sharing option. 5. Click the Options button. 6. In the drop-down window that appears, select the Share Files and Folders Using SMB option, select the checkbox next to the account(s) you want to use to connect to the Mac computer from your Windows computers, enter the password for the account into the dialog box that appears, and click OK. When you’ve selected the desired accounts, click Done. The default Workgroup name for Windows networking in Mac OS X is WORK- GROUP. I recommend that all your computers reside in the same workgroup. You can find out how to change your Mac’s Workgroup in Book II, Chapter 4. Putting Ubuntu into the Network Mix If you use the Linux distribution, Ubuntu, for your operating system, you still can share your files and printers with your Windows PCs and Windows- Book IV networking–enabled Macs. People in your home who use Windows can Chapter 3 access the shared resources of your Ubuntu computers just as they normally would through My Network Places or Network. However, they will be prompted for a username and password from one of the accounts that you set up for sharing before they can access the computer’s shared resources. To get your Ubuntu computer on the Windows network you need to install the SMB package that enables file and printer sharing with Windows. To do so, follow these steps: 1. On the Ubuntu toolbar, choose System➪Administration➪Shared Folders. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/23_275191-bk04ch03.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 388 388 Putting Ubuntu into the Network Mix 2. On the prompt that appears, select the Install Windows Network Support (SMB) option and click OK. Figure 3-4 shows an example of the prompt. If you don’t get the prompt, you may already be set up to share with Windows. Figure 3-4: The prompt you should see so that you can enable SMB. If the SMB package doesn’t install and the prompt keeps appearing, you need to install the samba package: 1. On the Ubuntu toolbar, choose System➪Administration➪Synaptic Package Manager. 2. In the prompt that appears, enter your account password and click OK. 3. In the Synaptic Package Manager window, click Settings from toolbar and choose Repositories. 4. In the Software Sources window that appears, select the Canonical- Supported Open Source Software (Main) option and then click the Close button. 5. If prompted with the Repositories Changed dialog box, click the Close button. 6. In the Synaptic Package Manager window, click the Reload button. 7. Click the Search button, type samba into the Search field, and click Search. The software should search and make an entry for the samba package in the list box on the Synaptic Package Manager window. 8. Right-click “samba” and choose Mark for Installation from the menu that appears. 9. Click the Apply button, review changes, and click Apply. 10. Close Synaptic Package Manager. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Allowing Sharing of Files and More 23_275191-bk04ch03.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 389 389 Opening the Sharing Gates of the Firewall in Windows XP and Vista Now you have to create a username for samba: 1. Click Applications on the Ubuntu toolbar. 2. Choose Accessories. 3. Open Terminal. 4. Type sudo smbpasswd -a username. Replace the word username with the username of your Ubuntu account, as Figure 3-5 shows. You can find out what your username is by typing whoami into the Terminal and then pressing Enter. 5. Enter your Ubuntu account password. 6. Enter a password for the SMB account. 7. Reenter the password for the SMB account. Windows sharing for your Ubuntu computer should now be enabled. You can start sharing files (see the next chapter in this minibook to find out more about sharing files and folders). The default Workgroup name for Windows networking in Ubuntu is MSHOME. I recommend that all your computers reside in the same Workgroup. You can see how to change Ubuntu’s Workgroup in Book II, Chapter 4 Figure 3-5: Book IV Creating an Chapter 3 SMB password. Opening the Sharing Gates of the Firewall in Windows XP and Vista Even though you have enabled sharing for Windows and have set up folders or printers to share, your firewall can prevent the sharing. To check the sharing settings, you must first bring up the Windows Firewall program. Here’s how to do it in Windows XP: www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/23_275191-bk04ch03.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 390 390 Opening the Sharing Gates of the Firewall in Windows XP and Vista 1. Choose Start➪Control Panel. If using the Classic Start menu, choose Start➪Settings➪Control Panel. 2. In the Control Panel window, select the Network and Internet Connections category. If using the Classic Control Panel view, ignore this step. 3. Click the Windows Firewall icon. Here’s how to access Windows Firewall in Windows Vista: 1. Choose Start➪Control Panel. If using the Classic Start menu, choose Start➪Settings➪Control Panel. 2. In the Control Panel window, select the Security category. If using the Classic Control Panel view, ignore this step. 3. Click the Windows Firewall icon. 4. In the Windows Firewall window, click the Change Settings link. If UAC is active and you received an alert, click Continue. When you have the Windows Firewall window open, make sure that the Don’t Allow Exceptions (for XP) or Block All Incoming Connections (for Vista) option is not selected, as seen in Figure 3-6. Figure 3-6: Do not select this option. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Allowing Sharing of Files and More 23_275191-bk04ch03.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 391 391 Sharing and the Mac’s Firewall Then you should click the Exceptions tab, and make sure that the File and Printer Sharing option is selected, as shown in Figure 3-7. Figure 3-7: Make sure to select this option. Sharing and the Mac’s Firewall Your Mac is smart — the firewall in Mac OS X Tiger and Leopard automati- cally adapts to the sharing settings you specify. No configuration of your Mac firewall is needed. Unless you have third-party firewall software installed, you’re good to go. However, if I have piqued your interest in the Mac firewall, you can access its settings with these simple steps: Book IV Chapter 3 1. Click the Apple icon on the menu bar. 2. Select System Preferences. 3. In Tiger, click the Sharing icon; in Leopard, click the Security icon. 4. In the Sharing or Security window that opens, click the Firewall tab. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/23_275191-bk04ch03.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 392 392 Opening Third-Party Firewalls Opening Third-Party Firewalls In addition to the built-in firewall utilities of Windows and Macintosh, a third- party firewall can prevent you from accessing its shared resources from other computers on your network. If you purchased or downloaded another Internet security suite or firewall solution, you should also check it to see whether you have authorized sharing. You should do this for each computer you have hosting files or printers. When you bring up your firewall program, you may see an option that lets you easily allow or block sharing; if not, you may have to manually enter the ports that are used when sharing. If you need assistance, try searching the Help files of your firewall program. In case you need to manually input them, here is a list of the ports used for sharing: ✦ To discover other computers running Windows Vista: • UDP 3702 • TCP 5357 • TCP 5358 ✦ To discover other computers running Windows XP and for file and printer sharing for both Windows XP and Vista: • UDP 137 • UDP 138 • TCP 139 • TCP 445 ✦ For Windows computers to discover devices on your home network: • UDP 1900 • TCP 2869 www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/24_275191-bk04ch04.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 393 Chapter 4: Sharing Files: Hosting a Folder Party In This Chapter  Sharing folders in Windows 2000, XP, and Vista  Using the new Public folder of Windows Vista  Sharing in Mac OS X Tiger and Leopard  Remembering what you’ve shared he previous chapter of this minibook tells you how to make your operat- Ting system and firewall willing to cooperate in sharing your files, folders, and other resources. In this chapter, you find out how to actually start sharing Whether you’re using Windows, Mac, or Ubuntu, in order to share a specific file, you have to share the whole folder that contains that file. When you share a folder, you share all the files and subfolders in it. In this chapter, I present the basic steps that you need to use to share folders in Windows, on the Mac, and in Ubuntu. Feel free to skip around to whatever sections pertain to the operating system or systems you have. Sharing a Folder in Windows 2000 Here’s how to share a folder in Windows 2000 among the computers on your network: 1. Right-click the folder you want to share and choose Sharing. The folder can be anywhere — on your Desktop, in My Computer, or in Windows Explorer. 2. Select the Share This Folder radio button. 3. Enter a name for this shared folder into the Share Name field. This is the name of the folder that is displayed when you or others view the shared resources of this computer from the other computers on the network. (The real name of the folder on the computer that shares the folder remains the same.) www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/24_275191-bk04ch04.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 394 394 Sharing a Folder in Windows XP 4. Specify the User Limit by selecting either the Maximum Allowed radio button, or selecting the Allow (blank) Users radio button and then entering the desired number of users in the text box (the blank). Leaving the Maximum Allowed option enabled is usually the best option. 5. Set the permissions for the access of the folder by other computers on the network by clicking the Permissions button, editing the permis- sions, and clicking OK; or leave permissions at their default levels. By default (when the permission settings aren’t changed), users on the network have full control of the files and directories in the folder, which means that everyone on the network can access, edit, and delete files. 6. Set the caching settings for the folder by clicking the Caching button, editing the settings, and clicking OK; or leave the caching settings at their default levels. Caching lets you specify how the files and programs from this folder are opened from the computers on your network. When a file or program is opened from a computer on the network, by default it isn’t cached on the remote computer. This means that the file or program remains on the computer hosting the file, rather than be temporarily downloaded to — or cached on — the remote computer. Caching lets you disconnect from the network when you have a file or program open from another computer. If you disconnect without having caching active, you’ll probably receive errors, and you may lose any changes you made to the file if it’s a document such as a Microsoft Word document. If you disconnected, even if caching is enabled, you can’t save the file to the computer hosting the file; however, you probably can edit the file while disconnected, and then when reconnected to the network, you can save the file to the host computer. 7. Click OK. You did it You should now be able to access the folder from the other computers on your network. See Book IV, Chapter 7 for help on accessing shared folders on your network. Sharing a Folder in Windows XP As discussed in the previous chapter of this minibook, you have two methods available for sharing in Windows XP: ✦ Simple File Sharing: As its name suggests, this is a simple way to share. The folders and printers you share are available to anyone on the network. ✦ Controlled access: This method (a term I’m using here but that isn’t an official name) lets you specify exactly who on your network can access your shared resources and what they can do with them. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Sharing Files: Hosting a Folder Party 24_275191-bk04ch04.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 395 395 Sharing a Folder in Windows XP The sharing methods that are supported vary among the different Windows versions as follows: ✦ Windows 2000: Supports only Simple File Sharing. ✦ Windows XP Home Edition: Supports only Simple File Sharing. ✦ Windows XP Professional: Supports Simple File Sharing, which comes enabled by default but can be disabled to activate controlled access. ✦ Windows Vista: Supports controlled access (with password protection), which comes enabled by default but can be disabled to activate Simple File Sharing. To switch between Simple File Sharing and controlled access, see Book IV, Chapter 3. If you haven’t disabled Simple File Sharing, here’s how to share a folder: 1. Right-click the folder you want to share and choose Sharing and Security. 2. Select Share This Folder on the Network, as shown in Figure 4-1. 3. Enter a name for this shared folder into the Share Name field. This is the name of the folder that is displayed when you or others view the shared resources of this computer from other computers on your network. (The real name of the folder on the computer that shares the folder remains the same.) Book IV Chapter 4 Figure 4-1: Enabling sharing for a folder in Windows XP. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/24_275191-bk04ch04.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 396 396 Sharing a Folder in Windows XP 4. Specify whether you want users on the network to be able to make changes to your files by selecting (or deselecting) the Allow Network Users to Change My Files option. 5. Click OK. You did it You should now be able to access the folder from the other computers on your network. See Book IV, Chapter 7 for help on accessing shared folders on your network. If you have disabled Simple File Sharing and are using the controlled access method, here’s how you can share a folder: 1. Right-click the folder you want to share and choose Sharing and Security. The folder’s Properties window appears with the Sharing tab opened. 2. Select the Share This Folder radio button. 3. Enter a name for this shared folder into the Share Name field. This is the name of the folder that is displayed when you or others view the shared resources of this computer from other computers on your network. (The real name of the folder on the computer that shares the folder remains the same.) 4. Specify the User Limit by selecting either the Maximum Allowed radio button or the Allow This Number of Users radio button and entering the desired number of users in the text box. Leaving the Maximum Allowed option enabled is usually the best option. 5. Set the permissions for the access of the folder by other computers on the network by clicking the Permissions button, editing the permis- sions, and clicking OK; or leave the permissions at their default levels. By default (when the permission settings aren’t changed), users on the network have full control of the files and directories in the folder, which means everyone on the network can access, edit, and delete files. 6. Set the caching settings for the folder by clicking the Caching button, editing the settings, and clicking OK; or leave the caching settings at their default levels. This lets you specify how the files and programs from this folder are opened from the computers on your network. You have the choice between three different caching settings, as follows: • Automatic Caching of Documents: When you open a document, such as a Microsoft Word file, from a computer on the network, it’s temporarily downloaded — cached — to the remote computer. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Sharing Files: Hosting a Folder Party 24_275191-bk04ch04.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 397 397 Sharing a Folder in Windows Vista This lets you disconnect from the network when you have a docu- ment open from another computer. If you disconnect without caching active, you’ll probably receive errors, and you may lose any changes you made to the file if it’s a document such as a Microsoft Word document. If you disconnected, even if caching is enabled, you can’t save the file to the computer hosting the file; however, you can prob- ably edit the file while disconnected, and then when reconnected to the network, you can save the file to the host computer. • Automatic Caching of Programs and Documents: Similar to the previous setting, but offers caching for program applications in addition to documents. • Manual Caching of Documents: Set by default, this setting doesn’t automatically cause documents to be cached. When you or someone else opens documents from this folder from other computers on your network, you must manually activate caching. 7. Click OK. You did it You should now be able to access the folder from the other computers on your network. See Book IV, Chapter 7 for help on accessing shared folders on your network. Sharing a Folder in Windows Vista One way to share files among users on your computer and others on the net- work is to use the Public folder. Simply copy or drag folders or files into the Public folder of your account. Though this way of sharing files can be useful because the folder is already set up to be shared on the network, moving files or folders to this folder can mess up the organization of your files and folders. Therefore, as discussed next, you can still manually share individual folders anywhere on your computer. In Windows Vista, you can also use the File Sharing Wizard to share specific Book IV folders: Chapter 4 1. Right-click the folder you want to share and choose Share. The File Sharing Wizard, shown in Figure 4-2, appears. The list box with the Name and Permission Level attributes appears, showing those who can access the shared folder. (I call it the Access List here.) The Windows account you’re currently logged in to is automati- cally added to the Access List. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/24_275191-bk04ch04.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 398 398 Sharing a Folder in Windows Vista Figure 4-2: The File Sharing Wizard in Windows Vista. 2. Using the drop-down list (just above the Access List and to the left of the Add button), choose whom you want to add to the Access List (or choose the Everyone option to specify sharing settings for all accounts simultaneously) and click Add. 3. For each of the accounts in the Access List, choose the Permission Level you desire by clicking its arrow. When a user account is set to the Reader Permission Level, the user can view shared files but not add, alter, or delete them. When an account is a Contributor, the user can view and add shared files but can alter or delete only the files that he or she has contributed to the shared folder. When an account is labeled as a Co-owner, the user can view, add, alter, or delete any shared files in the folder. 4. Click Share. You did it You are now able to access the folder from the other comput- ers on your network. See Book IV, Chapter 7 for help on accessing shared folders on your network. To configure more settings, such as the folder’s Share Name, User Limits, and Caching, you can activate the old-style window of a folder’s Sharing properties of previous Windows versions, which is similar to using the Control access method of sharing discussed earlier. Here’s how to do it: 1. Choose Start➪Computer. 2. On the toolbar of the Computer window, click Organize and select Folder and Search Options. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Sharing Files: Hosting a Folder Party 24_275191-bk04ch04.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 399 399 Sharing a Folder in Windows Vista 3. Click the View tab. 4. Deselect the Use Sharing Wizard option in the list box labeled Advanced Settings. 5. Click OK. After you’ve completed the preceding steps to disable Windows Vista’s File Sharing Wizard, here’s how to share a folder using the old-style window with more settings: 1. Right-click the folder you want to share and choose Share. 2. Click the Advanced Sharing button. If UAC is active and you received an alert, click Continue. 3. Select the Share this Folder option if the folder isn’t already set to be shared. 4. Enter a name for this shared folder into the Share Name field. This is the name of the folder that is displayed when you or others view the shared resources of this computer from other computers on your network. (The real name of the folder on the computer that shares the folder remains the same.) 5. In the text field to the right of the Limit the Number of Simultaneous Users To label, specify the desired number of users you want to be able to access the folder at the same time. Leaving the default value of 10 is usually fine. 6. Set the permissions for the access of the folder by other computers on the network by clicking the Permissions button, editing the permis- sions, and clicking OK; or leave the permissions at their default levels. By default (when the permission settings aren’t changed), users on the network have full control of the files and directories in the folder, which means that everyone on the network can access, edit, and delete files. Book IV Chapter 4 7. Set the caching settings for the folder by clicking the Caching button, editing the settings, and clicking OK; or leave the caching settings at their default levels. This lets you specify how the files and programs from this folder are opened from the computers on your network. As the following bullets discuss, you have the choice between three different caching settings: • Only the Files and Programs That Users Specify Will Be Available Offline: Set by default, this option doesn’t automatically cache documents. When you or someone else opens documents from this folder from other computers on your network, caching must be manually activated. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/24_275191-bk04ch04.qxp 6/16/08 9:54 PM Page 400 400 Sharing in Mac OS X • All Files and Programs That Users Open From the Share Will Be Automatically Available Offline: With this option enabled, when you open a document, such as a Microsoft Word file, from a computer on the network, it’s temporarily downloaded — or cached — to the remote computer. This caching lets you disconnect from the network when you have a document open from another computer and still be able to use that document. If you disconnect without having caching active, you’ll probably receive errors, and you may lose any changes you made to the file if it’s a document such as a Microsoft Word document. If you disconnected, even if caching is enabled, you can’t save the file to the computer hosting the file; however, you probably can edit the file while disconnected, and then when reconnected to the network, you can save the file to the host computer. • Files or Programs from the Share Will Not Be Available Offline: This option prevents automatic and manual caching of files and programs. 8. Click OK. Sharing in Mac OS X In Mac OS X Leopard, you can specify particular folders to share among other Macs and (if Windows Sharing is enabled, as discussed in Book IV Chapter 3) Windows computers: 1. Click the Apple icon and then click System Preferences. 2. In the System Preferences window, click the Sharing icon. 3. In the Sharing window that opens, select File Sharing. A list of the folders you’ve shared appears, as shown in Figure 4-3. Also listed (to the right of each folder name) is the type of permission you’ve assigned to that folder. 4. Click the plus sign to add a folder to the shared list. 5. Browse to the desired folder, click it, and then click Add. The folder is added to the Shared Folders list box. 6. You can click each folder in the Shared Folders list to edit its access permissions for each user, which is done by clicking the up and down arrows to the right of each user. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/

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