Lecture notes on introduction to Human Resource Management

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Human resource management J. Coyle-Shapiro, K. Hoque, I. Kessler, A. Pepper, R. Richardson and L. Walker MN3075 2013 Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences This is an extract from a subject guide for an undergraduate course offered as part of the University of London International Programmes in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences. Materials for these programmes are developed by academics at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). For more information, see: www.londoninternational.ac.ukThis guide was prepared for the University of London International Programmes by: J. Coyle-Shapiro, PhD, Professor of Organisational Behaviour and Head of Employment Relations and Organisational Behaviour, LSE. K. Hoque, Bsc (Econ), PhD, Professor of Human Resource Management, Warwick Business School, Univeristy of Warwick. I. Kessler, BA, MA, PhD, Professor of International Human Resource Management, King’s College London. A. Pepper, DBA, Professor of Management Practice, LSE. R. Richardson, BSc, MA, PhD, Formerly Deputy Director, Reader in Industrial Relations, LSE. L. Walker, MA, Seear Fellow, LSE. This is one of a series of subject guides published by the University. We regret that due to pressure of work the authors are unable to enter into any correspondence relating to, or arising from, the guide. If you have any comments on this subject guide, favourable or unfavourable, please use the form at the back of this guide. University of London International Programmes Publications Office Stewart House 32 Russell Square London WC1B 5DN United Kingdom www.londoninternational.ac.uk Published by: University of London © University of London 2013 The University of London asserts copyright over all material in this subject guide except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced in any form, or by any means, without permission in writing from the publisher. We make every effort to respect copyright. If you think we have inadvertently used your copyright material, please let us know.Contents Contents Introduction ............................................................................................................ 1 Structure of the guide .................................................................................................... 2 Activities ....................................................................................................................... 2 Style of the guide .......................................................................................................... 2 Aims ............................................................................................................................. 2 Learning outcomes ........................................................................................................ 2 Syllabus ......................................................................................................................... 3 Using this subject guide ................................................................................................. 3 Essential reading ........................................................................................................... 4 Further reading .............................................................................................................. 4 Online study resources ................................................................................................... 5 How the reading is listed ............................................................................................... 6 Examination advice........................................................................................................ 7 Chapter 1: Human resource management: theories, models, policies and practices ........................................................................................................ 11 1.1 Introduction .......................................................................................................... 11 1.2 What is HR management? ..................................................................................... 12 1.3 Why are HR policies, programmes and plans so important?..................................... 13 1.4 How do HR policies, programmes and plans work? ................................................. 16 1.5 The difference between academic study and the practice of HR management .......... 20 1.6 A reminder of your learning outcomes .................................................................... 21 Chapter 2: Recruitment and selection .................................................................. 25 2.1 Introduction .......................................................................................................... 25 2.2 The importance of recruitment and selection .......................................................... 26 2.3 Recruitment ........................................................................................................... 28 2.4 Selection ............................................................................................................... 36 2.5 Is there an ideal, or ‘one best way’ approach to final selection? .............................. 41 2.6 A reminder of your learning outcomes .................................................................... 43 2.7 Test your knowledge and understanding ................................................................ 43 Chapter 3: Training and development .................................................................. 45 3.1 Introduction .......................................................................................................... 45 3.2 Definitions of training and development ................................................................. 47 3.3 Why is training and development important? ......................................................... 48 3.4 Considerations in the design of training programmes. What are the major stages involved in designing a training programme? ............................................................... 51 3.5 Implementing training ........................................................................................... 52 3.6 Learning methods .................................................................................................. 55 3.7 Barriers to learning ................................................................................................ 56 3.8 Learning theories ................................................................................................... 57 3.9 Vocational education ............................................................................................. 58 3.10 A reminder of your learning outcomes .................................................................. 59 3.11 Test your knowledge and understanding .............................................................. 59 iMN3075 Human resource management Chapter 4: Individual performance: attitudes and behaviour ............................. 63 4.1 Introduction .......................................................................................................... 63 4.2 What is performance? ............................................................................................ 65 4.3 Conceptualisation of performance .......................................................................... 66 4.4 Task and contextual performance ........................................................................... 67 4.5 Organisational citizenship behaviour as contextual performance ............................. 68 4.6 Consequences of OCB ........................................................................................... 70 4.7 Antecedents of OCB .............................................................................................. 72 4.8 Social exchange constructs .................................................................................... 72 4.9 Commitment ......................................................................................................... 74 4.10 Summary ............................................................................................................. 77 4.11 A reminder of your learning outcomes .................................................................. 77 4.12 Test your knowledge and understanding .............................................................. 78 4.13 Sample examination question .............................................................................. 78 Chapter 5: Psychological contracts ...................................................................... 79 5.1 Introduction .......................................................................................................... 79 5.2 Definitions of psychological contracts ..................................................................... 82 5.3 Social exchange theory .......................................................................................... 83 5.4 With whom does an employee have a contract? ..................................................... 84 5.5 Categorising employer relationships with employees .............................................. 85 5.6 Types of contracts .................................................................................................. 86 5.7 How are transactional and relational contracts related? .......................................... 88 5.8 Measurement of psychological contract .................................................................. 89 5.9 The key features of the psychological contract ........................................................ 91 5.10 Creation and management of the psychological contract ...................................... 91 5.11 Development of contract breach and violation ...................................................... 93 5.12 Consequences of the psychological contract breach .............................................. 96 5.13 Human resource practices and psychological contracts ......................................... 98 5.14 Are psychological contracts changing? ................................................................. 98 5.15 Summary ........................................................................................................... 100 5.16 A reminder of your learning outcomes ................................................................ 101 5.17 Test your knowledge and understanding ............................................................ 101 Chapter 6: Reward systems and motivation ...................................................... 103 6.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................ 103 6.2 Definitions and classifications .............................................................................. 105 6.3 Selecting a pay scheme ........................................................................................ 108 6.4 Pay schemes in operation ..................................................................................... 112 6.5 Reward outcomes ................................................................................................ 114 6.6 Principal–agent theory ......................................................................................... 114 6.7 Motivation theory ................................................................................................ 115 6.8 Process theories – how are people motivated? ..................................................... 117 6.9 Pay, attitudes and behaviours............................................................................... 118 6.10 A reminder of your learning outcomes ................................................................ 121 6.11 Test your knowledge and understanding ............................................................ 121 6.12 Sample examination question ............................................................................ 121 Chapter 7: Performance management ................................................................ 123 7.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................ 123 7.2 Definitions and classifications .............................................................................. 125 7.3 Selecting an approach ......................................................................................... 126 7.4 Design features ................................................................................................... 130 iiContents 7.5 A reminder of your learning outcomes .................................................................. 137 7.6 Test your knowledge and understanding .............................................................. 137 7.7 Sample examination question .............................................................................. 137 Chapter 8: Job design and redesign ................................................................... 139 8.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................ 139 8.2 Taylorism and scientific management ................................................................... 141 8.3 Job enlargement .................................................................................................. 142 8.4 Herzberg and job enrichment ............................................................................... 143 8.5 Hackman and Oldham’s job characteristics model................................................. 144 8.6 Teamworking ....................................................................................................... 148 8.7 Management teams............................................................................................. 154 8.8 A reminder of your learning outcomes .................................................................. 157 8.9 Test your knowledge and understanding .............................................................. 157 Chapter 9: Employee involvement and participation ......................................... 161 9.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................ 161 9.2 Definitions and classifications .............................................................................. 163 9.3 Approaches to employee involvement and participation ........................................ 170 9.4 Employee participation: objectives and patterns at the micro and macro levels ...... 171 9.5 Changing patterns of employee involvement and participation ............................. 172 9.6 Employee involvement and participation in practice .............................................. 174 9.7 Impact and outcomes .......................................................................................... 177 9.8 A reminder of your learning outcomes .................................................................. 179 9.9 Test your knowledge and understanding .............................................................. 180 Chapter 10: Organisational justice ..................................................................... 181 10.1 Introduction ...................................................................................................... 181 10.2 Different conceptualisations of justice ................................................................ 183 10.3 Procedural justice .............................................................................................. 186 10.4 Why does procedural justice matter? .................................................................. 188 10.5 Outcomes of justice ........................................................................................... 189 10.6 Procedural justice applied to motivation ............................................................. 191 10.7 Organisational justice and HR practices .............................................................. 192 10.8 Organisational justice and performance appraisal ............................................... 194 10.9 Summary ........................................................................................................... 195 10.10 A reminder of your learning outcomes ............................................................. 195 10.11 Test your knowledge and understanding ......................................................... 196 10.12 Sample examination question .......................................................................... 196 Chapter 11: Diversity and equal opportunities .................................................. 197 11.1 Introduction ...................................................................................................... 197 11.2 What is the current position of women in the labour market? ............................. 200 11.3 How can we explain the disadvantaged position faced by women? ..................... 203 11.4 Equal opportunities policies ............................................................................... 206 11.5 The business argument for equal treatment ........................................................ 208 11.6 The role of the government in promoting equality of opportunity ........................ 212 11.7 The role of trade unions ..................................................................................... 214 11.8 Self-employment ............................................................................................... 215 11.9 A reminder of your learning outcomes ................................................................ 215 11.10 Test your knowledge and understanding .......................................................... 215 Chapter 12: Labour economics ........................................................................... 219 12.1 Introduction ...................................................................................................... 219 12.2 The standard economic theory explaining the firm’s demand for labour ............... 220 iiiMN3075 Human resource management 12.3 Refinements to the standard theory ................................................................... 222 12.4 Internal labour markets ...................................................................................... 227 12.5 The HR implications of ILMs ............................................................................... 230 12.6 Summary ........................................................................................................... 231 12.7 A reminder of your learning outcomes ................................................................ 231 12.8 Test your knowledge and understanding ............................................................ 231 12.9 Sample examination question ............................................................................ 232 Chapter 13: HR strategies and high performance work systems ...................... 233 13.1 Introduction ...................................................................................................... 233 13.2 Human resource strategies ................................................................................. 234 13.3 What is an HR strategy?..................................................................................... 235 13.4 Is there one best HR strategy? ........................................................................... 237 13.5 High performance work practices or high commitment practices ......................... 237 13.6 Possible contingencies ....................................................................................... 239 13.7 Comment .......................................................................................................... 241 13.8 The changing context of HR decisions................................................................. 241 13.9 The growing importance of HR strategies ........................................................... 243 13.10 Greater HR flexibility and the implication for HR strategy .................................. 248 13.11 A reminder of your learning outcomes .............................................................. 250 13.12 Test your knowledge and understanding .......................................................... 250 13.13 Sample examination question .......................................................................... 250 Chapter 14: Studying HR management .............................................................. 253 Appendix 1: Full list of further reading for the course ...................................... 255 Books ........................................................................................................................ 255 Journal articles .......................................................................................................... 256 Appendix 2: Sample examination paper ............................................................ 259 Appendix 3: Guidelines for answering sample examination questions ............. 261 Chapter 4 .................................................................................................................. 261 Chapter 6 .................................................................................................................. 261 Chapter 7 .................................................................................................................. 262 Chapter 10 ................................................................................................................ 262 Chapter 12 ................................................................................................................ 263 Chapter 13 ................................................................................................................ 264 ivIntroduction Introduction This subject guide is about human resource management (HRM). This is the management activity taken by commercial firms, state owned enterprises and other organisations to recruit, retain and motivate their employees. In other words HRM is the bundle of policies, programmes and plans which organisations adopt with the objective of making full use of the people they employ. These include everything from recruitment and selection techniques (which initiate the relationship between firm and employee), to the mass of rules that determine how people are treated as current employees, and all the way to policies on separation (which determine whether, and in what circumstances, an employee is to be let go). This guide takes, as its organising framework, a model of strategic HRM advanced by Boxall and Purcell in their book Strategy and human resource management (Palgrave Macmillan, third edition, 2011). They conceptualise workforce performance as a function of capabilities (the knowledge, skills and aptitudes which employees need to carry out their work), motivation (the incentives which employees require to encourage them to perform to the best of their abilities) and work organisation (the way that work and organisations are structured so as to allow employees to perform well). To this we add employment relations (the policies, programmes and practices which govern the relationship between employees and employers) on the basis that employee relationship management is a key responsibility of the HRM function. See Figure 1. The guide follows the perspective adopted in most HRM textbooks and looks at the subject from an organisational point of view, but it also acknowledges that a range of other factors shape the use of HRM policies and practices, including government and regulatory frameworks. Capabilities Employment Motivation relations Work organisation Figure 1: Organising framework 1MN3075 Human resource management Structure of the guide The guide is divided into 14 chapters, each focusing on a different topic. Every chapter includes a number of features: • the Learning outcomes for the chapter • the Essential and Further reading lists • a list of References cited in the chapter • an Introduction to the topic of the chapter • a chapter Summary or Conclusion section at the end of each chapter • a range of Sample examination questions to help you to test what you have learnt. (See Appendix 3 for feedback). Activities In addition to these key features of every chapter, Activities have been provided throughout the guide to help you engage and interact with the material you are studying. Although these are not assessed, it is strongly recommended that you complete these Activities as you work through the course. Taking an active role from the beginning of this course and developing this throughout, will give you confidence in your knowledge, ability and opinions. Style of the guide The study of HRM is multidisciplinary drawing upon ideas from business strategy, economics, psychology, sociology and industrial relations. What this means is that you will receive a range of viewpoints on the subject as a whole. You may also notice a difference in approach from chapter to chapter. Aims The aims of this course are to: • give students an introduction to the key elements of human resource management • demonstrate how the social sciences can assist in understanding the management of human resources; and to examine and evaluate human resource policies and practices of organisations • help students to examine the different theories which try to explain the relationship between HRM and organisational performance • develop students’ ability to analyse and critically evaluate HR policies and practices. Learning outcomes By the end of this course, and having completed the Essential reading and Activities, you should be able to: • describe the relationship between HRM and organisational performance and be able to critically evaluate the empirical evidence • critically evaluate alternative perspectives on HR practices • analyse the relationship between HR practices and their outcomes for the individual and the organisation 2Introduction • evaluate the effectiveness of different HR practices • comment upon the limitations of the theories covered. Syllabus The syllabus uses as its organising framework a model of HRM built around four areas of activity: capabilities, motivation, employment relations and work organisation. ‘Capabilities’ include recruitment and selection, as well as learning and development. ‘Motivation’ covers individual performance and the psychological contract, reward systems, performance management and job design. ‘Employment relations’ include employee involvement and participation, organisational justice and diversity. Finally, ‘work organisation’ covers labour markets, high performance work systems and the state of HRM in contemporary organisations. The syllabus examines current theoretical perspectives on the relationship between human resource practices and organisational performance. These include strategic HRM, organisational behaviour and employment relations frameworks, which offer different explanations of how HRM practices impact on organisational performance. The relationship between motivation, organisational commitment (defined as an individual’s emotional attachment to an organisation) and both individual and corporate performance is central to understanding the effects of HRM practices on employees. The skills demonstrated by students are expected to go beyond knowledge and comprehension. As well as demonstrating that they know and understand the major HRM policies and practices, theoretical frameworks and supporting empirical evidence, students are expected to be able to explain the relationship between different human resource policies and practices and the underlying theoretical frameworks (for example, by describing the relationship between performance management and goal setting theory, or pay strategy and different theories of motivation). These theoretical frameworks will then provide the basis for analysing and evaluating whether HRM practices are more or less likely to achieve their hypothesized outcomes. The potential limitations of each theory and the subsequent implications for organisational practice will also be considered. Using this subject guide This subject guide presents a basic introduction to the main topics in the study of human resource management. As with any guidebook, this subject guide is designed to help you find your way around the subject matter. It seeks to outline, explain and clarify the central concerns of the study as well as provide information about studying for your examinations. On the other hand, because it is a guide, it cannot go into detail and there are bound to be omissions and over simplifications. Wider reading is, therefore, essential. You should not just treat this subject guide as your textbook. If you place too much emphasis on the subject guide without doing additional reading, you will find it exceedingly difficult to pass the examination. You should also develop your own set of notes as you work through the subjects, which will help you engage with the material in a critical way. 3MN3075 Human resource management Essential reading Your Essential reading for this course comes from three places: textbooks, journal articles and one chapter of a textbook available in the virtual learning environment (VLE). Textbooks Three textbooks are recommended for this course. These are general textbooks that are useful for most chapters in this guide. You should buy, or have regular access to, these textbooks as a number of the Essential reading are taken from them. Please remember that the more you read, the better your understanding of the subject area will be. Bratton, J. and J. Gold Human resource management: theory and practice. (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2012) fifth edition ISBN 9780230580565. Kramar, R. and J. Syed Human resource management in a global context. (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2012) first edition ISBN 9780230251533. Torrington, D., L. Hall, S. Taylor and C. Atkinson Fundamentals of human resource management. (Harlow: Financial Times Prentice Hall, 2009) first edition ISBN 9780273713067. Detailed reading references in this subject guide refer to the editions of the set textbooks listed above. New editions of one or more of these textbooks may have been published by the time you study this course. You can use a more recent edition of any of the books; use the detailed chapter and section headings and the index to identify relevant readings. Also check the VLE regularly for updated guidance on readings. In addition, the following lists specific chapters for Essential reading: Bach, S. Managing human resources. (Oxford: Blackwell, 2005) fourth edition ISBN 9781405118514 Chapter 15 ‘Direct participation’. Claydon, T. and J. Beardwell Human resource management: a contemporary approach. (Harlow: Prentice Hall, 2007) fifth edition ISBN 9780273707639 Chapter 14 ‘Employee participation and involvement’. Folger, R. and R. Cropanzano Organizational justice and human resource management. (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 1998) ISBN 0803956878 Chapter 1 ‘Equity and distributive justice as outcome fairness’, Chapter 2 ‘Process as procedural and interactional justice’, Chapter 4 ‘Organisational justice and staffing decisions’ and Chapter 5 ‘Organisational justice and performance evaluation’. Torrington, D., L. Hall, S. Taylor and C. Atkinson Human resource management. (Harlow: Financial Times, 2011) (ISBN 9780273756927 Chapter 7 ‘Recruitment’ and Chapter 8 ‘Selection methods and decisions’. Journal articles As part of your Essential reading, you also need to access a number of journal articles from the Online Library. To help you read extensively, all International Programmes students have free access to the University of London Online Library where you will find the full text or an abstract of some of the journal articles listed in this subject guide. Further reading Please note that as long as you read the Essential reading you are then free to read around the subject area in any text, paper or online resource. You will need to support your learning by reading as widely as possible and by thinking about how these principles apply in the real world. To help you read extensively, you have free access to the VLE and University of London Online Library (see below). 4Introduction A full list of all Further reading for this course is given in Appendix 1. Other useful texts for this course include: Baron, J.N and D.M. Kreps Strategic human resources: frameworks for general managers. (John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1999) third edition ISBN 9780471072539. Boxall, P. and J. Purcell Strategy and human resource management. (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2011) third edition ISBN 9780230579354. Boxall, P., J. Purcell and P. Wright (eds) The Oxford handbook of human resource management. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007) ISBN 9780199282517. Storey, J. Human resource management: a critical text. (London: Thomson Learning, 2007) third edition ISBN 9781844806157. Journals The following journals are also particularly useful and a number of readings are taken from them. They are available in the Online Library: • British Journal of Industrial Relations (Business Source Premier) • Human Resource Management Journal (ABI Inform and Business Source Premier) • Human Resource Management Review (Business Source Premier) • International Journal of Human Resource Management (Business Source Premier). Online study resources In addition to the subject guide and the Essential reading, it is crucial that you take advantage of the study resources that are available online for this course, including the VLE and the Online Library. You can access the VLE, the Online Library and your University of London email account via the Student Portal at: https://my.londoninternational.ac.uk.london/portal/ You should have received your login details for the Student Portal with your official offer, which was emailed to the address that you gave on your application form. You have probably already logged in to the Student Portal in order to register As soon as you registered, you will automatically have been granted access to the VLE, Online Library and your fully functional University of London email account. If you have forgotten these login details, please click on the ‘Forgotten your password’ link on the login page. The VLE The VLE, which complements this subject guide, has been designed to enhance your learning experience, providing additional support and a sense of community. It forms an important part of your study experience with the University of London and you should access it regularly. The VLE provides a range of resources for EMFSS courses: • Self-testing activities: Doing these allows you to test your own understanding of subject material. • Electronic study materials: The printed materials that you receive from the University of London are available to download, including updated reading lists and references. • Past examination papers and Examiners’ commentaries: These provide advice on how each examination question might best be answered. 5MN3075 Human resource management • A student discussion forum: This is an open space for you to discuss interests and experiences, seek support from your peers, work collaboratively to solve problems and discuss subject material. • Videos: There are recorded academic introductions to the subject, interviews and debates and, for some courses, audio-visual tutorials and conclusions. • Recorded lectures: For some courses, where appropriate, the sessions from previous years’ Study Weekends have been recorded and made available. • Study skills: Expert advice on preparing for examinations and developing your digital literacy skills. • Feedback forms. Some of these resources are available for certain courses only, but we are expanding our provision all the time and you should check the VLE regularly for updates. Making use of the Online Library The Online Library contains a huge array of journal articles and other resources to help you read widely and extensively. To access the majority of resources via the Online Library you will either need to use your University of London Student Portal login details, or you will be required to register and use an Athens login: http://tinyurl.com/ollathens The easiest way to locate relevant content and journal articles in the Online Library is to use the Summon search engine. If you are having trouble finding an article listed in a reading list, try removing any punctuation from the title, such as single quotation marks, question marks and colons. For further advice, please see the online help pages: www.external.shl.lon.ac.uk/summon/about.php How the reading is listed The reading for each of the chapters in this subject guide is divided into Essential reading, Further reading and References cited. Essential reading For each chapter you are required to do some reading that is essential. This Essential reading is listed at the start of each chapter. It is also listed in this Introduction. It is from this material that the majority of your knowledge will be gained, so it is important that you read as much of it as you can. Most of the time, you should read the subject guide chapter first, then move on to the Essential reading. However, please note that in some chapters you will be advised to do the reading at certain points in the chapter. Further reading At the beginning of each chapter, a list of possible Further readings will be offered. A selection is always offered, but none of them is compulsory. You can select from the list for each chapter if you wish to. Therefore, you should not be worried about the length of this list as this is only to give you a choice should you want one You may find it helpful to look at the Further readings if you are particularly interested in a specific subject. However, we do encourage you to do as much reading as possible. 6Introduction References cited Books and journals that have been referred to in this subject guide are listed at the start of each chapter. You do not need to read these materials unless you wish to; they are there for reference purposes only. Examination advice Examination format Important: the information and advice given in the following section are based on the examination structure used at the time this subject guide was written. Please note that subject guides may be used for several years. Because of this we strongly advise you to check both the current Regulations for relevant information about the examination, and the VLE where you should be advised of any forthcoming changes. You should also carefully check the rubric/instructions on the paper you actually sit and follow those instructions. The assessment for this course is through a three-hour unseen written examination. You will be expected to answer four questions from a choice of eight questions. Questions are generally structured in three parts. The first part (‘Define’) asks for the definition or explanation of a concept or construct and is primarily a test of knowledge. The second part (‘Describe’) asks for applications of the concept or construct and is primarily a test of understanding and application. The third part (‘Discuss’) is a short essay in which you will be expected to analyse and critically evaluate an issue related to the concept or construct which is the subject of the previous two parts of the question. These shorts essays need to present an argument that expresses a view on the subject. They should not repeat the notes written in this subject guide. Instead the essays should show independent, reflective and critical thought about the issues involved. Remember, it is important to check the VLE for: • up-to-date information on examination and assessment arrangements for this course • where available, past examination papers and Examiners’ commentaries for the course which give advice on how each question might best be answered. Examiners’ commentaries The Examiners’ commentaries, which are provided annually, are a very good resource. The reports provide you with two sources of information: • how students have performed in the previous year’s examination • what the Examiners are looking for in the answers. A consistent comment in the last few Examiners’ commentaries, is that answers to examination questions were generally far too descriptive. The analysis, if any, was left to the last paragraph, but more commonly the argument was only stated in the last sentence. A significant proportion of candidates tend to reproduce theories relating to the topic of the question regardless of what the question is asking. Some candidates, on seeing a familiar word or concept, write everything they know about that word or concept and do not address the terms of the question asked. Overall, too many candidates are trying to fit a revised ‘standard’ answer into the question asked. The consequences are that candidates are giving strong signals to Examiners that they do not 7MN3075 Human resource management know what the question is asking for. A critical learning point from the Examiners’ commentaries is that describing particular theories is not what the question is looking for – the key is to use the theories, recognising their strengths and limitations to help address the issues raised by the question. Ensure that you refer to the Examiners’ commentaries frequently throughout your study. As you cover topics, you should attempt to answer previous examination questions and understand the Examiners’ comments on those particular examination answers. Take time to attempt to fully understand the Examiners’ comments and the mistakes made by previous students. This should be done topic by topic, and you should not progress from one topic to the next until you have: a. attempted to answer a previous examination question on that topic b. read the Examiners’ comments on that question c. thought about ways in which you could improve your own answer. 8Part 1: Introduction Part 1: Introduction 9MN3075 Human resource management Notes 10Chapter 1: Human resource management: theories, models, policies and practices Chapter 1: Human resource management: theories, models, policies and practices 1.1 Introduction This chapter starts with an introduction to the field of HR management in which four questions are posed: • What is HR management? • Why are HR policies, programmes and plans so important? • How do HR policies, programmes and plans work? • What is the difference between academic study and the practice of HR management? 1.1.1 Aims of the chapter • The aim of this chapter is to introduce students to the study of human resource management. 1.1.2 Learning outcomes By the end of this chapter, and having completed the Essential reading and Activities, you should be able to: • describe what is meant by HR management • explain why HR policies, programmes and plans are key to an organisation’s success • discuss the difference between academic study and the practice of HR management. 1.1.3 Essential reading There is no truly Essential reading for this chapter. It will, however, be very useful to help your understanding of the first section if you could look at the following texts: Kramar, R. and J. Syed Human resource management in a global context. (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2012) first edition ISBN 9780230251533 Chapter 1 ‘Contextualizing human resource management’ and Chapter 2 ‘A critical perspective on strategic human resource management’. Torrington, D., L. Hall, S. Taylor and C. Atkinson Fundamentals of human resource management. (Harlow: Financial Times Prentice Hall, 2009) first edition ISBN 9780273713067 Chapter 1 ‘Introducing human resource management’. 1.1.4 Further reading Books Bratton, J. and J. Gold Human resource management: theory and practice. (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2012) second edition ISBN 9780805838626 Chapter 1 ‘The nature of contemporary HRM’. Journal articles Huselid, M. ‘The impact of human resource management practices on turnover, productivity, and corporate financial performance’, Academy of Management Journal 38(3) 1995, pp.645–70. 11MN3075 Human resource management 1.1.5 References cited Dessler, G. Human resource management. (Pearson, 2007) eleventh edition. Hellriegel, D., S. Jackson, J. Slocum and G. Staude Management. (Oxford University Press, 2009) third edition. Chapter 13 ‘Managing human resources’ ISBN 9780195982169. 1.1.6 Synopsis of chapter content In this chapter we define what is meant by HR management, explain why HR policies programmes and plans are so important, and consider the relationship between HR management and productivity. We examine the difference between the academic study of HR management and practice, and explain why theory is important. 1.2 What is HR management? In 1937 Ronald Coase, a Noble Prize winning economist, explained how some economic activities are most efficiently coordinated within firms, while others are most efficiently coordinated by markets. ‘Management’ can therefore be defined as the art and science of coordinating activities within a firm, via a process of managerial decision-making, including areas such as finance, operations, sales and marketing, and human resources. HR management can in turn be defined as: ‘The process of analysing and managing an organisation’s human resource needs to ensure satisfaction of its strategic objectives’ (Hellriegel, Jackson, Slocum and Staude, 2009) and ‘The policies and practices involved in carrying out the “people” or human resources aspects of a management position, including recruitment, screening, training and appraising’ (Dessler, 2007). Important themes to note in these definitions, which will be picked up again during the course of the subject guide, are: • the role of analysis as well as management • the connection between HRM and achieving an organisation’s strategic goals • the importance of HR policies and practices; and specific HR activities such as recruitment, selection, learning and education, and • performance management to which we might add other things, such as reward, job design, employment (or ‘manpower’) planning, diversity management, equal opportunities and employment relations. The history of HR management can be dated back to the 19th century, when some enlightened industrial companies in the US and Europe employed welfare officers to look after the wellbeing of workers, especially women and children. In the 1920s and 1930s companies employed labour managers to handle pay, absence, recruitment and dismissal. By the late 1940s labour management and welfare work had been integrated under the banner of ‘personnel administration’. As the importance of people to the success of firms was increasingly recognised throughout the 1970s and 1980s, personnel administration became ‘personnel management’ and eventually ‘human resource management’. Today some companies refer simply to the ‘people’ function and call their most senior HR executive the ‘chief people officer’. 12Chapter 1: Human resource management: theories, models, policies and practices More information about the history of HR management can be found on the website of the UK’s Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development at: www.cipd.co.uk/hr-resources/factsheets/history-hr-cipd.aspx 1.3 Why are HR policies, programmes and plans so important? The effective management of an organisation’s employees (i.e. its human resources) is arguably the single most difficult, most complex, most ambiguous, yet most important task that managers face. It is an area of management policy-making that is not characterised by rigorous globally accepted professional standards. This is true for at least four reasons: • HR policies refer to human behaviour, which is complex, often conflict- ridden, and culturally dependent. • There are many different HR policy instruments and practices. • The success or otherwise of different HR policies, programmes and plans is difficult to evaluate. • Many managers believe that people management is just common sense. 1.3.1 HR policies refer to human behaviour Because HR policy deals with managing people, it involves human behaviour and relationships that are inherently complex, potentially conflictual and sometimes problematic. Machines or money markets are so much easier to deal with than people, so that (contrary to much popular opinion) being a production engineer or a finance officer is arguably far easier and more straightforward than being responsible for ‘people management’. In order to understand HR policy properly, whether as an analyst or as a practitioner, you need to acquire many skills. You need to know how and why organisations make the choices they do and behave the way they do; 1 1 In this guide we this means you need a theory of the firm. But you also need to know how will use the terms and why workers behave and react in the ways they do, whether as ‘fi rm’ and ‘company’ individuals or in groups; and you need to be able to judge how they might interchangeably, behave and react if circumstances (e.g. the HR policies) were to alter; this refl ecting American and means, among other things, that you need effective theories of motivation. British usage. These are formidable requirements, and they imply that you need to blend together the different social science disciplines, for example, economics, industrial relations and organisational behaviour. HR policy is therefore inherently multidisciplinary, which might make it more interesting for some but definitely makes it more difficult for everyone. You also need to know more than just the theory; you need to know the empirical work too. This requires a grasp of research design, a store of complex information, and the ability to manipulate and interpret that information, which is why statistical expertise is becoming part of the HR professional’s job description. So, to understand and design HR policies properly is not a trivial intellectual task. 1.3.2 Many HR policy instruments and practices A second reason why HR policy is hard to get right comes from its multiplicity of policy instruments. Policy-makers in all fields have policy instruments. One problem for HR policy-makers is that there are so many HR instruments available to them: hiring policy, induction policy, training policy, employee development policy, pay and rewards policy, job design decisions, career or promotion policies, and so on. 13MN3075 Human resource management Adding to the complexity, each area of HR policy is likely to have some impact on the others. This means that it is unwise to analyse any single policy in isolation from the others. One should instead see it in the context of the whole, which means having a sense of possible ‘HR strategies’, or groups of policies. The very multiplicity of policies makes the whole subject ambiguous. 1.3.3 HR policies, programmes and plans are difficult to evaluate A third reason why HR policy is so difficult is that HR policies, programmes and plans are very hard to evaluate properly, so that managers cannot easily establish whether their policy choices are wise. Neither can outside analysts easily find out whether a firm’s policies, or those of a set of firms, are working optimally. HR managers often distinguish between policies (local sets of rules or codes established help coordinate people management activities within an organisation), programmes (interventions designed by HR managers to achieve specific objectives such as a change programme following a merger or redundancy programme resulting from a prolonged decline in sales) and plans (specific instruments or tools such as an incentive plan). These three active forms of intervention can be contrasted with HR practices, which are informal rules or codes – ‘the way things are done around here’. These are helpful distinctions to use when evaluating HR activities. Natural scientists can conduct controlled experiments to assess the full consequences of a course of action. Social scientists cannot usually do this, and when they can it is normally possible only in the artificial environment of the social science laboratory. Running controlled experiments in the real world of work is exceedingly hard, and very rare. So HR policy evaluations have to be done indirectly, and with much less precision. The result is that no one can be at all confident that managers are in fact doing the right thing, even if their HR policy choices look plausible by the standards of common sense or some theory. 1.3.4 ‘People management is just common sense’ The fourth reason why HR is so hard to get right is the prejudice shared by so many managers that people management can be done by almost anyone, and requires common sense rather than special training. It seems that everyone has an opinion on HR issues. HR is sometimes seen as an area of management that should be done by those who are not quite good enough to do other more demanding management tasks. 1.3.5 The important of getting HR policies, programmes and plans right Having suggested some reasons why HR management is complex, we now want to explain why it is nevertheless very important to get it right, and from there to consider the principal objectives or purposes of HR policy. We need to consider three linked questions: • What leads to organisational success? • What is the role of HR? • What is the underlying objective of HR policy? 1.3.6 What leads to organisational success? Commercial success depends on many things, central among which is that a firm must offer to the market the right products on the right terms. 14

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