Troubleshooting and fixing your wired and wireless connections

Troubleshooting and fixing your wired and wireless connections
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Dr.MohitBansal,Canada,Teacher
Published Date:25-10-2017
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30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 475 Chapter 1: Dealing with Connection and Performance Problems In This Chapter  Troubleshooting and fixing your wired and wireless connections  Diagnosing and combating wireless interference  Repairing network adapters  Fixing Internet problems aving problems connecting with your network? Can’t get on the HInternet? Are you ready to give up and throw the networking gear out the window? Well, before you give up, go through this chapter. It will help you troubleshoot the underlying cause and should assist you in getting your network and Internet back online. Fixing Wireless Connections Maybe you can’t connect to your wireless network or are intermittently being disconnected from your wireless network. Or your network vanishes from your list of available wireless networks. If any of these situations apply to you, you’re at the right spot for getting answers. If you’re using a laptop or mobile device, move closer to the wireless router. This can help determine the underlying cause. The first step to help troubleshoot the problem is to look over the following common underlying causes and then pick one to try to resolve: ✦ Adapter problem: Issues from device or connection settings can be identified by the following, especially if you are using special or propri- etary features or technologies (range or speed boosting, MIMO, wireless N, and so on): • Computer won’t connect at all when relatively close to the router, and usually doesn’t happen regularly. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 476 476 Fixing Wireless Connections • Computer connects with another neighboring network intermittently. • Data rate never hits expectations, such as getting only 11 Mbps instead of 54 Mbps, or only 54 Mbps instead of something higher. ✦ Interference: Being adversely affected by other radio waves, or RF inter- ference, may be identified by the following symptoms, and more so if you are aware that you have common interfering devices around (discussed later): • Disconnections from the wireless network. • Disappearance of your wireless network from your list of available networks ✦ Poor range: If you experience the following when you’re relatively distant from the router, you likely just don’t have the wireless coverage you desire, rather than have a real problem: • Low speed (data rate), when relatively far from router. • Computer won’t connect at all or disconnects, when relatively far from router. Now you can proceed with the following sections, which help you try to resolve the underlying cause. Start with the one that seems the most likely for your particular situation, and if the problem still persists, proceed with the next likely cause, and so on, until you have success. Addressing adapter problems First, look over the specific issues and possible solutions described in this section: If you keep automatically connecting to neighboring wireless networks Examine your connectivity and preferred network settings by following these steps: 1. Check the preferred list. Make sure your home network (or the network you want to stay con- nected to) is on the top of your preferred network list. 2. Clean the preferred list. You may try removing all the other preferred network entries, leaving just your home network. 3. Check advanced settings. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Connection and Performance Problems 30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 477 477 Fixing Wireless Connections In Windows XP’s advanced network connectivity settings, make sure you Book V don’t have the Automatically Connect to Non-Preferred Networks option Chapter 1 selected. If you need help finding these settings for Windows, Mac, or Ubuntu, refer to Book IV, Chapter 1. Generally, when your wireless adapter automatically connects to neighbor- ing wireless networks, it’s because those networks have a better signal than your home network. This can be due to an interfering device near your wireless router or poor range of your network. So you may want to think about investigating if you have interference problems, discussed in the next section, and possibly expanding your wireless coverage, discussed in the last subsection of this section. If you can’t connect to a wireless N router with an older (wireless B) wireless adapter Try changing wireless mode from Mixed (wireless N, G, and B) to wireless G and B or wireless G only, as follows: 1. Log in to your router’s Web-based configuration utility. Open your Web browser, type the IP address of your router, and press Enter. If you don’t know the IP address, refer to Book V, Chapter 3. Enter your login credentials when prompted. If you don’t know the password, refer to Book V, Chapter 3. 2. Find the wireless mode option in the wireless settings. Wireless settings usually have their own tab or are in the main or gen- eral section. However, sometimes the wireless mode option is in the advanced wireless section. 3. Change the wireless mode and apply the changes. Select an option to eliminate wireless N, usually wireless G and B or wireless G only. If you aren’t getting the high speed (data rates) you were hoping for from your equipment Remember that to use special features such as speed boosting; your router and all the adapters in the computers must also have the same feature, and generally be the same brand of equipment. This is similar to using differ- ent wireless standards/technologies. Even though the wireless b, g, and n standards are interoperable, the speeds and performance vary. For example, if you’re using a wireless n router to get the high speeds advertised by the www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 478 478 Fixing Wireless Connections vendor, you must also use wireless N adapters in your computers — at least for the computers you want to have the high speeds. Plus, some routers and adapters may only achieve the highest performance when using the same brand. Solving other miscellaneous problems Here are a few tasks you can try to fix general wireless adapter problems: ✦ Reboot your network. Unplug the power cords for your Internet modem and router and wait 30 seconds. Then reconnect the power to just the Internet modem, wait 30 seconds, and reconnect the power to your router. ✦ Reset your wireless adapter. You start by giving your adapter a fresh start. Disable your problematic wireless adapter, wait a few seconds, and then re-enable it. If you need help, refer to Book IV, Chapter 1. ✦ Restart your computer. Next, you should refresh your computer — give it a nice Restart. ✦ Reinstall your adapter. If you haven’t fixed the problem yet, and you still think you have an isolated problem with your wireless adapter, you may want to reinstall the adapter’s driver. This should fix any quirks of the adapter you may be experiencing. Also, when you reinstall the driver, you should get the latest release, which may fix your problem and other known issues. You should refer to Book II, Chapter 5 for more information on updating your adapter’s driver. If you can’t get any of your computers to connect to your router, you may want to try resetting it to factory defaults. See Book V, Chapter 3 for more information. If you are having problems connecting to a WEP-enabled wireless network in Mac OS X Tiger, try putting a dollar sign in front of the WEP key. Dealing with interference Electrical and radio devices that use — or bleed onto — the same frequency band (2.4 GHz) of your wireless network can interfere with it. These devices include the following: ✦ Neighboring wireless networks ✦ Cordless phones www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Connection and Performance Problems 30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 479 479 Fixing Wireless Connections ✦ Baby monitors Book V Chapter 1 ✦ Wireless speakers and headphones ✦ Kitchen microwaves If you’re using the less popular wireless A equipment, then you’re using the 5 GHz frequency band instead. You may experience interference from other similar 5 GHz devices. As mentioned earlier, being intermittently disconnected from your network and not being able to see your network are signs of interference, especially if you have these common interfering devices around. Plus, two more things can help troubleshoot if interference is your problem: ✦ Pay attention when the problem occurs. When you have a problem with connecting to your network, take a quick look around, scratch your head, and see whether someone is using one of the common interfering items, such as those listed in the previous bullets. ✦ Disable suspect interferers: Sometimes, interfering devices don’t have to be used to cause problems. For example, a 2.4 GHz cordless phone may constantly interfere with your network even when the phone is hung up and charging. So to help find the interfering device, unplug your suspected devices one at a time to see whether the problems go away. If you know or suspect that interference is your problem, here are several things you can try to fix the problem. Change your wireless router’s channel The interfering device may affect only a portion of the frequency band of wireless networks, so changing the channel of your wireless network may fix the problem. Here’s how you can change the channel of your wireless router: 1. Log in to your router’s Web-based configuration utility. Open your Web browser, type the IP address of your router, and press Enter. If you don’t know the IP address, refer to Book V, Chapter 3. Enter your login credentials, when prompted. If you don’t know the password, again refer to Book V, Chapter 3. 2. Find the wireless channel setting (see Figure 1-1 for an example). You can find this with all the other general wireless settings, which are usually on their own tab or are in the main or general section. 3. Change the channel and apply the changes. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 480 480 Fixing Wireless Connections Select a different channel, preferably channel 1, 6, or 11; however, you can try the other channels after you try the recommended ones. Keep trying different channels by repeating the steps until the problem goes away or you have tried all the channels. Figure 1-1: Example of the channel setting for a wireless router. Move away from suspect interferer Interfering devices have a greater negative impact on your wireless network when closer to your wireless router and network adapters. Therefore, try sep- arating them to be as far apart as possible, either by moving the interferer or your wireless router and computers. Get rid of the interferer Of course, if you’ve found the interferer and can’t stop the interference with your network, you can stop using the interferer. If you’re currently using wireless B, G, or N, you can try using wireless A, which usually doesn’t have as many interference problems; however, it isn’t as popular, so the products will cost more. Also, keep in mind that many Wi-Fi hotspots (and probably most of your friends’ networks) don’t support wireless A, so if you do want to try wireless A, you should purchase dual-or tri-band wireless adapters (which support wireless A along with wireless G, N, or both) for your computers. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Connection and Performance Problems 30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 481 481 Fixing Wireless Connections Book V Addressing range issues Chapter 1 If you believe that poor range of your wireless network is the cause of your connectivity problems, you should think about expanding your wireless cov- erage. However, before spending money, here are two things you can try: ✦ Reposition your router. It’s best to put your wireless router right in the middle of your desired coverage area. Positioning your router in this spot helps ensure that you have relatively equal coverage in all direc- tions. Figures 1-2 and 1-3 give you examples of the differences between good and bad placements. Wireless router’s signal Wireless router Figure 1-2: Not so good placement of a wireless router in a home. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 482 482 Fixing Wireless Connections Wireless router’s signal Wireless router Figure 1-3: Better placement of a wireless router in a home. The locations of cable or phone outlets can impact where you can place your wireless router, but you can try to work around this roadblock. You can think about running a cable or phone line to the optimum spot for your wireless router, or consider installing new outlets. ✦ Reposition your computer. You may also think about bringing your computers closer to the wireless router by moving rooms. But even small changes can help, such as bringing your PC tower up off the ground onto a desk so that the antenna has more exposure to the router. If you’re still having connectivity issues, here are several ways you can really increase the range of your wireless network: ✦ Replace your antennas. This can be a very easy and cheap way to increase the coverage of your network. If you have just one or two com- puters out on the fringe of the wireless coverage, you can purchase better antennas for them. If you want more all-around coverage, get a www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Connection and Performance Problems 30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 483 483 Reconnecting Wired (Ethernet) Connections replacement antenna for your wireless router. To get the best results for Book V computers on or outside the coverage fringe, replace both your router Chapter 1 and adapter antennas. ✦ Upgrade to wireless N. This can give you much better range and performance over older wireless standards, such as wireless G or B. ✦ Install a wireless extender/repeater. This involves purchasing a wire- less extender that will act as a repeater for the wireless traffic between your wireless router and distant computers. ✦ Add access points (APs). This involves purchasing one or more APs (similar to wireless routers) and placing them around your home. This provides the greatest increase in range but generally requires the most time and money. For more information on all these methods, refer to Book II, Chapter 7. Reconnecting Wired (Ethernet) Connections Fixing connectivity issues with wired network connections usually is much easier than it is with wireless connections. Wired connections don’t require troubleshooting interference and range issues. You’ll usually just find an unplugged cable or hardware quirk that’s fixed by restarting your hardware and computer. Here are some things to try: ✦ Check physical connections. Take a quick look behind your computer to see whether the Ethernet cable somehow popped out of the Ethernet port. Then follow the Ethernet cable all the way to the router or Internet modem to see whether little Billy got hold of the scissors and decided to take a cut at the cable. Finally, check whether the other end of the Ethernet cable is securely plugged into your router or Internet modem. ✦ Reboot your network. Unplug the power cords for your Internet modem and router and wait 30 seconds. Then reconnect the power to just the Internet modem, wait 30 seconds, and reconnect the power to your router. ✦ Reset your network adapter. You should give your adapter a fresh start. Disable your problematic network adapter, wait a few seconds, and then re-enable it. If you need help, refer to Book IV, Chapter 1. ✦ Restart your computer. Refresh your computer — give it a nice Restart. ✦ Reinstall your adapter. If you haven’t fixed the problem yet, and you still think you have an isolated problem with your network adapter, you may want to reinstall the adapter’s driver. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 484 484 Fixing Internet and Limited or No Connectivity Issues This should fix any quirks of the adapter you may be experiencing. Plus, when you reinstall the driver, you should get the latest release, which may fix your problem and other known issues. You should refer to Book II, Chapter 5 for more information on updating your adapter’s driver. If you can’t get any of your computers to connect to your router, you may want to try resetting it to factory defaults. See Book V, Chapter 3 for more information. Fixing Internet and Limited or No Connectivity Issues Can you connect to your network but can’t access the Internet? Are you get- ting “Limited or No Connectivity” alerts in Windows XP, such as that shown in Figure 1-4? If you answered yes to one of these, read on. Figure 1-4: The Limited or No Connectivity alert in Windows XP. Getting the Limited or No Connectivity alert typically means that your computer is properly connected to your router or Internet modem, but your router or Internet modem is misconfigured or experiencing a quirk. If you’ve just installed Service Pack 2 for Windows XP and are receiving the alert, go to support.microsoft.com/kb/892896. Here are several things you can do to try to fix the problem: ✦ Repair the connection. You can first run the network repair process in Windows to see whether it fixes your problem. In Windows XP, double- click your adapter’s icon in the system tray, click the Support tab, and then click the Repair button. If you don’t see the network icon, refer to Book IV, Chapter 1. In Windows Vista, right-click the network icon and select Diagnose and Repair. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Connection and Performance Problems 30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 485 485 Fixing Internet and Limited or No Connectivity Issues If you’re using Mac OS X Leopard, you can use the Network Diagnostics Book V utility, accessible by choosing the Apple icon➪System Chapter 1 Preferences➪Network and then clicking the Assist Me button on the bottom of the window. ✦ Reboot your network. Unplug the power cords for your Internet modem and router and wait 30 seconds. Then reconnect the power to just the Internet modem, wait 30 seconds, and reconnect the power to your router. ✦ Restart your computer. Next, you should refresh your computer — give it a nice Restart. ✦ Check router DHCP settings. If you have messed around with your router’s settings, you may want to check to see whether you disabled DHCP, which is set by default. To do so, log in to your router’s Web- based configuration utility. Next, open your Web browser and type the IP address of your router and press Enter. If you don’t know the IP address, refer to Book V, Chapter 3. Enter your login credentials when prompted. If you don’t know the password, refer to Book V, Chapter 3. Next, find the DHCP settings (see Figure 1-5 for an example). Figure 1-5: An example of the DHCP settings of a router. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 486 486 Fixing Internet and Limited or No Connectivity Issues These are probably with the other general network settings, including the IP address setting for the router. Now you can verify whether DHCP is enabled. ✦ Reset Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). If you’ve tried all the other steps and you aren’t having problems with all your other computers, the Internet Protocol on your computer may be corrupted. Microsoft offers Guided Help (automatic repair) and instructions on resetting Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) in Windows XP at support.microsoft.com/kb/299357. If you’re using Windows Vista, here’s how you can manually reset these services: Click Start and type cmd in Start Search. Then right-click the cmd icon and choose Run as Administrator. If UAC is active and you received an alert, click OK to continue. Next, type netsh winsock reset (see Figure 1-6) and press Enter. Figure 1-6: Resetting the winsock service in Windows Vista. Now, restart your computer and bring up the command prompt again, just as you did in the first two steps. Finally, type netsh int ip reset (see Figure 1-7) and press Enter. Restart your computer. If you aren’t getting any alert or error, but simply can’t access the Internet, here are several things you can do: ✦ Make sure you’re connected to the network or Internet modem. ✦ Check your Internet modem. You can verify if your Internet connection is down by looking at the status lights on your Internet modem. If it doesn’t look as though you’re getting an Internet connection, call your Internet service provider (ISP) to see what the problem is. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Connection and Performance Problems 30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 487 487 Fixing Internet and Limited or No Connectivity Issues ✦ Restart your computer. Rebooting your computer may help fix the Book V problem. Chapter 1 ✦ Reboot your network. Unplug the power cords for your Internet modem and router and wait 30 seconds. Then reconnect the power to just the Internet modem, wait 30 seconds, and reconnect the power to your router. Figure 1-7: Resetting the TCP/IP service in Windows Vista. ✦ Set static IP address correctly. If you’ve manually set a static IP address for your network adapter, try setting the DNS server to your router’s IP address, as shown in Figure 1-8. Figure 1-8: Entering the router IP address in the DNS field when setting a static IP. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/30_275191-bk05ch01.qxp 6/16/08 10:31 PM Page 488 488 Fixing Internet and Limited or No Connectivity Issues If you can’t get any of your computers to connect to the Internet, you may want to try resetting your adapter to factory defaults. See Book V, Chapter 3 for more information. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/31_275191-bk05ch02.qxp 6/16/08 10:12 PM Page 489 Chapter 2: Fixing Sharing Issues In This Chapter  Troubleshooting and fixing file sharing problems  Restoring shared printers  Troubleshooting and fixing sharing issues between Windows, Mac OS X, and Ubuntu re your computers connecting to the network but you can’t seem to Aget them to talk to each other? Are you having problems accessing shared folders and printers? This chapter steps you through some tasks that you can use to try to get your system functioning like a network if you’re having such issues. Troubleshooting and Fixing Sharing Issues If you don’t see your computer(s) in My Network Places or Network, or you can’t access shared folders or printers, this chapter may be able to help you. As you’ll soon find out, many things can prevent sharing on your network. If you’re having problems with shared printers only, start with the “Getting a Shared Printer Back Online” section, later in this chapter, and then come back here. The following sections help you to troubleshoot and fix your sharing issues. Check to see whether computers are connected You should verify whether the computer you’re using and the one you’re trying to access the shared resources on are logged into the operating system (Windows, Mac, Ubuntu, or any other) and connected to the same network. Book IV, Chapter 1 shows how to check your network status and connect to networks. If you have more than two computers and you’re trying to access more than one computer’s shared resources, the problem is likely with your router. First, try rebooting your network. If you’ve messed with your router’s set- tings, make sure that you haven’t enabled client or AP isolation. The last resort is to reset your router to factory defaults, as discussed in Book V, Chapter 3. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/31_275191-bk05ch02.qxp 6/16/08 10:12 PM Page 490 490 Troubleshooting and Fixing Sharing Issues Try to manually access shares It can take a few minutes for computers to show in My Network Places and Network after you boot up your computer and connect to the network. However, you can use a computer’s name or IP address to manually access shared resources, such as shown in Figure 2-1 and discussed in Book IV, Chapter 7. Manually accessing a computer on the network in a Web browser. Figure 2-1: Manually accessing a Windows computer in Windows. If you are having trouble accessing only certain shared folders or printers but can see other shared resources from the same computer, sharing for the problematic folder(s) or printer(s) may have been disabled. Try setting up the folder or printer for sharing again. If you need help with setting up shar- ing, refer to Book IV, Chapters 4 and 5. Verify your firewall settings You should make sure that file and printer sharing is enabled in your operat- ing system’s firewall (see Figure 2-2), and in any other third-party firewall program you use, for all computers you’re having trouble with. Third-party firewalls may have a network trust mechanism that requires you to specify that you trust the network before sharing is enabled. You may also have to select an option to enable sharing, or manually input the ports used by sharing. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Fixing Sharing Issues 31_275191-bk05ch02.qxp 6/16/08 10:12 PM Page 491 491 Troubleshooting and Fixing Sharing Issues Book V Chapter 2 Figure 2-2: File and Printer Sharing option in the Windows XP Firewall. See Book IV, Chapter 3 for more information on sharing and firewalls. Check the network location in Windows Vista The first time you connect to a network in Windows Vista, you must classify its location or type: Home, Work, or Public. If you choose Public, such as when connecting to a Wi-Fi hotspot, sharing and other applicable settings are automatically disabled. Therefore, you should verify that Home or Work is selected for all the Windows Vista computers that are giving you problems sharing. You can, however, change your network classification at any time through the Network and Sharing Center by following these steps: 1. Click the network icon in the system tray. 2. Click Network and Sharing Center. 3. Click the Customize link for the network. 4. Click Private and click Next. If UAC is active and you received an alert, click Continue. 5. Click Close. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/31_275191-bk05ch02.qxp 6/16/08 10:12 PM Page 492 492 Troubleshooting and Fixing Sharing Issues Reset your network adapter Giving your network adapters a fresh start may fix any quirks that they’re experiencing. Disable the network adapters on the computers, wait a few seconds, and then re-enable them. If you need help disabling and enabling your adapter, refer to Book IV, Chapter 1. Reboot your computers Rebooting your computers sometimes works like magic to fix any kinks that your network adapters and operating systems are experiencing that prevent sharing. (Rebooting your computer sometimes solves lots of other mysteri- ous problems, too) Reboot your network Unplug the power cords for your Internet modem and router and wait 30 sec- onds. Then,, reconnect the power to only the Internet modem, wait 30 sec- onds, and reconnect the power to your router. Verify that sharing is enabled by your operating system Make sure that you have properly enabled sharing on your operating system, which is discussed in Book IV, Chapter 3. Check computer network names and Workgroups Failing to follow the recommended computer-naming format while in the same Workgroup may interfere with sharing. You should analyze all the com- puter names and Workgroup designations of all the computers that you are having trouble hosting or accessing sharing resources on. Refer to Book II, Chapter 4 for details on accessing these settings. Here are a few tips to follow: ✦ Assign the same Workgroup name for all your computers. ✦ Pick unique computer names for each computer. ✦ Don’t use computer names longer than 15 characters. ✦ Avoid using spaces or any special characters in your computer names. ✦ Use all uppercase characters for computer names. Reinstall your adapter If you haven’t fixed the problem yet, and you still think you have an isolated problem with your network adapter, you may want to reinstall the adapter’s www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/Fixing Sharing Issues 31_275191-bk05ch02.qxp 6/16/08 10:12 PM Page 493 493 Accessing Mac and Ubuntu Computers from Windows driver. Doing so should fix any quirks that the adapter may be experiencing. Book V Also, when you reinstall the driver, you should get the latest release, which Chapter 2 may fix your problem and other known issues. Refer to Book II, Chapter 5 for more information on updating your adapter’s driver. Getting a Shared Printer Back Online Can’t see your shared printer in My Network Places or Network? Can’t add a shared or network printer to your computer? Can’t print to a shared printer? If the answer is yes to any of these questions, you obviously have a shared printer problem. Here are several things you can try to get the shared printer back online: ✦ Check the printer. Go to the printer you are trying to access and make sure it’s powered on and plugged into the computer, print server, or directly into the network. ✦ Reboot the printer. Simply turn the printer off and then on again. This may cure the problem. ✦ Verify that the printer works on the host computer. If you are sharing the printer through a computer that’s connected to the network rather than through a print server, make sure that the printer is recognized on the host computer and that you can print. If you can’t, then the problem is with the printer or host computer. Your problem is not a shared printer issue. ✦ Verify that the printer is shared. If you are sharing the printer through a computer that’s connected to the network, verify that sharing for the printer isn’t disabled in the operating system. For example, in Windows, when you display the printer properties, you should see the Share This Printer radio button marked as shown in Figure 2-3. If you are using a print server, refer to the product documentation and Help feature for any related software that’s installed on your computer for information on how to troubleshoot the problem. ✦ Perform general sharing troubleshooting. If you still can’t print to shared printers, see the subsections pertaining to general sharing issues in the first section of this chapter. Accessing Mac and Ubuntu Computers from Windows Can’t access a Mac OS X or Ubuntu computer from Windows — or vice versa? Having trouble transferring files between these different platforms? Here are a few steps and tips that may help. www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/31_275191-bk05ch02.qxp 6/16/08 10:12 PM Page 494 494 Accessing Mac and Ubuntu Computers from Windows Figure 2-3: Shared printer settings in Windows XP. ✦ Check to see whether Windows sharing is enabled in Mac OS X or Ubuntu. If you are having problems seeing or accessing Mac OS X or Ubuntu computers from Windows, you should verify Windows sharing is enabled. To see exactly how to do this, go to Book IV, Chapter 3. To share between Mac OS X and Windows 98 computers, the Windows username must match the account short name in Mac OS X. ✦ Check share names. Make sure share names for folders and printers in Windows don’t include hyphens or spaces; Mac OS X doesn’t like these. In Mac OS X and Ubuntu, don’t include any special characters in the share names for shared folders and printers — Windows doesn’t like this. If you’re receiving an alert message containing Error code = -43 in Mac OS X when accessing or copying to or from a Windows shared folder, the share name or file name(s) contains characters that Windows doesn’t allow. Remove any special characters from share names and file names. ✦ Perform general sharing troubleshooting. If you still haven’t resolved the problem, you can try the general sharing troubleshooting techniques discussed in the first section of this chapter. If you’re having problems sharing between Mac OS X and Windows, Apple offers a software program called Bonjour that might help. You can download it for free from Apple’s Web site: www.apple.com/support/downloads/bonjourforwindows.html www.it-ebooks.info http://itbookshub.com/

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