Lecture notes in Biochemical Engineering

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CHEMICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2017 Version 1 2017 CAUTION (DISCLAIMER) The Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering has used all reasonable endeavours to ensure that the material contained in this handbook was correct at the time of being published. However; 1. the department gives no warranty and accepts no responsibility for the accuracy or the completeness of the material; 2. no reliance should be made by any user on the material, but instead the user should check for confirmation with the originating or authorising faculty, department or other body; 3. and the Department reserves the right at any time to make changes as it deems appropriate This handbook is to be used only as a guide and all current information can be obtained via The University of Melbourne website; www.unimelb.edu.au 2 Version 1 2017 Contents WELCOME TO THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING ............. 4 DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING ............................................ 5 TEACHING AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF ..................................................................................... 5 LET US INTRODUCE OURSELVES .................................................................................................. 6 SAFETY ......................................................................................................................................... 13 YOUR STUDENT SERVICES .......................................................................................................... 16 RESEARCH IN THE DEPARTMENT ............................................................................................... 17 STUDY ABROAD, EXCHANGE AND OVERSEAS RESEARCH EXPERIENCE .................................. 18 WHY STUDY OVERSEAS? .............................................................................................................................. 18 FURTHER INFORMATION? ............................................................................................................................... 18 VACATION WORK ......................................................................................................................... 19 SKILLS TOWARDS EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM (STEP) .................................................................. 22 ENGR90033 INTERNSHIP ............................................................................................................. 23 CHEN90028 INDUSTRY PROJECT……………………………………………………………………………...…….24 SPECIAL CONSIDERATION ........................................................................................................... 25 PLAGIARISM & COLLUSION ......................................................................................................... 26 WHAT IS PLAGIARISM? .................................................................................................................................. 26 WHAT IS COLLUSION? ................................................................................................................................... 26 EXAMINATIONS ............................................................................................................................ 27 EXAMINATION RULES ................................................................................................................................................... 27 CALCULATOR POLICY .................................................................................................................................... 27 LIST OF SUBJECTS ....................................................................................................................... 28 SEMESTER 1 ............................................................................................................................................... 28 SEMESTER 2 ............................................................................................................................................... 29 COURSE PLANS ............................................................................................................................ 30 MASTER OF ENGINEERING (CHEMICAL) ......................................................................................................................... 30 MASTER OF ENGINEERING (BIOCHEMICAL) .................................................................................................................... 36 MASTER OF ENGINEERING (CHEMICAL WITH BUSINESS) .................................................................................................. 41 MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL ENGINEERING STUDENT SOCIETY…………………………..44 COMMITTEE MEMBERS ................................................................................................................................................................................ 44 3 Version 1 2017 WELCOME TO THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING It is a pleasure to welcome all new students to the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Melbourne and those of you who are returning for later years of your course. The number of students in each year continues to be high. In addition, students from other countries have grown in number and we want very much for those students to feel part of the Department. This handbook does not replace the official Handbook, but it provides information at a glance. Subject details are included, together with teaching responsibilities, some sample programmes and assessment details. Please note that it is not wise to purchase textbooks until you receive advice from teaching staff. Please make yourselves aware of the many student services available at the University of Melbourne at no extra cost to you; full details are available on the university website www.unimelb.edu.au. Many students have benefited from consulting the Student Counselling Service, and the Academic Skills Unit can provide invaluable advice on study skills. All assignments must be submitted by specific deadlines. With the exception of Design Project, all assignments and prac reports are submitted through the LMS, where they are automatically checked for plagiarism (see Page 26). In addition, you will be required to complete a Laboratory Risk Assessment Sheet prior to commencing each practical exercise and this sheet needs to be handed to your laboratory demonstrator at the start of your class (refer to page 13). We always appreciate feedback on how we can improve your experience with us. There are formal mechanisms to do this through the Staff-Student Liaison Committee that meets twice each semester. You can provide input to this committee through your MUCESS class representative (see page 44). Towards the end of each semester you will be provided with teaching evaluation survey (known as the Student Experience Survey- SES). You will be asked to complete these online at the end of each semester. Our aim is to provide a high quality programme and this needs good teaching. We respond to the advice given in the survey and you will be advised of changes made to improve the teaching based on these survey results. You are also always welcome to meet with me personally, or with the Course Co-ordinator, Associate Professor Dalton Harvie, should you have an issue that needs immediate attention. All members of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering wish you well throughout your time with us. Please feel free to come and talk to me about issues that may be of concern to you. It is my hope that the Department remains a friendly and helpful place in which to study. Welcome once again to the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering ‘family’. We are truly glad to have you. Paul Webley Professor and Head of Department Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 4 Version 1 2017 DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING TEACHING AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Name Position Email Teaching Staff Paul Webley Head of Department and Professor paul.webleyunimelb.edu.au Peter Scales Deputy Dean and Professor peterjsunimelb.edu.au Andrea O'Connor Deputy Head and Associate Professor a.oconnorunimelb.edu.au Dalton Harvie Deputy Head and Associate Professor daltonhunimelb.edu.au Greg Qiao Deputy Head and Professor gregghqunimelb.edu.au George Franks Professor and Course Co-ordinator gvfranksunimelb.edu.au David Dunstan Professor davidedunimelb.edu.au David Shallcross Professor dcshalunimelb.edu.au Frank Caruso Australian Laureate Professor fcarusounimelb.edu.au Amanda Ellis Professor amanda.ellisunimelb.edu.au Sandra Kentish Head of School and Professor sandra.kentishunimelb.edu.au Ray Dagastine Professor rrdunimelb.edu.au Sally Gras Associate Professor sgrasunimelb.edu.au Anthony Stickland Senior Lecturer stadunimelb.edu.au Greg Martin Senior Lecturer gjmartinunimelb.edu.au Luke Connal Senior Lecturer luke.connalunimelb.edu.au Kathryn Mumford Senior Lecturer mumfordkunimelb.edu.au Chris Honig Lecturer christopher.honigunimelb.edu.au Colin Scholes Senior Lecturer caschounimelb.edu.au Gabriel da Silva Lecturer gdasilvaunimelb.edu.au Daniel Heath Lecturer daniel.heathunimelb.edu.au Administrative Staff Louise Baker Executive Assistant to Head of E: eahod-chemengunimelb.edu.au Department P: +61 3 8344 7441 David Benson Academic Support Coordinator E: d.bensonunimelb.edu.au P: +61 3 8344 5881 5 Version 1 2017 LET US INTRODUCE OURSELVES Professor Sandra Kentish Sandra is a true University of Melbourne tragic, with a Bachelors, Masters and PhD all from this university. Before she became an academic, she worked at Qenos, Kodak Australia and Kimberly Clark Australia for a total of nine years. Her research interests lie in membrane technology for gas and liquid separations; and the use of ultrasonics in industrial processes. She has been Head of Department since October 2012. However, in early 2017, she will move to a broader role as Interim Head of the School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering and a new Head of Department will be appointed. Professor Peter Scales Peter Scales grew up in Bendigo, Australia and completed his undergraduate (BSc(Hons)) and graduate (PhD) degrees in Physical Chemistry at the University of Melbourne. He worked for 3 years between these degrees in the minerals industry and then for 3 years as a postdoc with ICI in the UK. He returned to Australia in 1991 to manage a research centre in particulate fluids processing and became a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Chemical Engineering in 1998. He was Head of Department between 2003 and 2006 and became Deputy Dean of the School of Engineering in 2007. He has research interests in separation processes involving particulates and molecules in water, with particular emphasis on filtration and sedimentation processes. He also has interests in the manufacture, stabilisation and flocculation of particulates in water. This includes algal and waste-water sludges and the recycle of water from waste-water. He teaches into Particle Mechanics and Processing, Bio-enviro Engineering. Associate Professor Sally Gras Sally Gras obtained her undergraduate degrees (with Honours) in both science (biochemistry and molecular biology) and engineering (chemical) from The University of Melbourne. She then completed a PhD in protein misfolding at Cambridge University as a Gates Scholar funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Following this Sally returned to The University of Melbourne where she currently teaches Biochemical and Pharmaceutical Engineering in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Sally is also director of the ARC Dairy Innovation Hub. 6 Version 1 2017 Associate Professor Andrea O’Connor Andrea O’Connor completed her BE(Chemical) and PhD at the University of Melbourne before spending a year as a postdoctoral research fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She was appointed as Station Director of the MIT School of Chemical Engineering Practice to supervise engineering student projects at two industrial sites, one in the US and one in Japan. In 1997 she came back to the University of Melbourne as a lecturer and she is now Deputy Head of Department. She teaches Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells and Biotransport Processes (part of the Bioengineering Systems major). Her research interests are in tissue engineering, biomaterials, separation processes, porous materials and food production. Professor David Shallcross David Shallcross completed his BE and PhD in the Department before going to work at the University of California and Stanford University. After a brief spell at CSIRO he joined the academic staff of the Department in January 1990. He served as Head of Department from 2007 to 2012 and is currently Director of the Engineering Learning Unit. For three years he was Vice President of the Institution of Chemical Engineers and he remains on various committees of the IChemE. His research interests include ion exchange processes, biomass combustion and learning outcome assessments. David currently teaches into the second year undergraduate program. Professor Dave Dunstan Dave Dunstan received his undergraduate and PhD degrees from the University of Melbourne. Upon graduation, new horizons presented and Post Doctoral positions at Uppsala, Santa Barbara and Princeton ensued. 7 Version 1 2017 Professor George Franks George Franks is a Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and has over two decades of research and experience in the ceramics and minerals processing fields. After completing his undergraduate degree in materials science and engineering at MIT in 1985, he worked for seven years as a process development engineer, then returned to study, receiving his PhD in Materials in 1997 from University of California. He came to Australia to undertake post doctoral research at the University of Melbourne, leading research in surface chemistry effects in suspension rheology. His research interests are in ceramic powder processing and flocculation and flotation of minerals. He teaches Process Equipment Design and Minerals Materials and Recycling. Professor Paul Webley Paul Webley obtained his PhD degree in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and spent 7 years in industry in the USA before joining Monash University as a lecturer. He moved to The University of Melbourne in 2012 and heads up the Clean Energy Laboratory. His research goals are to understand the fundamental science of energy and to exploit this knowledge to develop applied technology for more efficient processing and energy production. Currently, his group focuses on development and characterisation of nanomaterials for efficient gas and liquid processing, gas and liquid separation technology, carbon capture, carbon dioxide utilisation, natural gas processing, biofuels from algae and advanced energy storage analysis and development. http://www.chemeng.unimelb.edu.au/webley/ Senior Lecturer Kathryn Mumford Kathryn Mumford obtained her undergraduate BEng (Chem), BCom and postgraduate (PhD) from the University of Melbourne. Since graduation, Kathryn has undertaken various industrial roles including contaminated site management and carbon capture and storage technologies. She joined the Department in 2012, and is now a Senior Lecturer. She currently teaches Chemical Engineering Management and Heat and Mass Transport Processes 8 Version 1 2017 Deputy Head and Professor Greg Qiao Professor Greg Qiao received his Bachelor of Engineering in Polymer Engineering at Donghua University in 1982 and his Ph.D. at the University of Queensland in 1996 in synthetic organic chemistry. He then worked at the University of Melbourne, when he entered the field of synthetic polymer chemistry and engineering. He became a Lecturer in the Department of Chemical and Bimolecular Engineering in 2002, then promoted to a Senior Lecturer in 2004, Associate Professor and Reader in 2007, and full Professor in 2009. Since 2012, he has also been an Australian Research Council’s professorial Future Fellow. Professor Qiao currently is an Acting Associate Dean Research at the Melbourne School of Engineering. Professor Amanda Ellis Professor Amanda Ellis graduated with a Ph.D (Applied Chemistry) from the University of Technology, Sydney in 2003. She has undertaken two Postdocs in the USA and a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in New Zealand at Industrial Research Ltd (now Callaghan Innovations). In 2006 Amanda commenced at Flinders University of South Australia as a teaching/research lecturer in the School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, and in 2014 became a Full Professor. She commenced at University Melbourne in 2017. Her research involves novel polymer coatings, functionalised carbon nanotubes and graphene, membrane technologies, microfluidics, genotyping and DNA nanotechnology. Currently, she is an Australian Research Council’s professorial Future Fellow (2014- 2018), a Board Member of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute (RACI), Board Member of the Membrane Society of Australia, and a co-founder and executive member of the Australia & New Zealand Micro/Nanofluidics group. Australian Laureate Fellow Professor Frank Caruso Frank Caruso is a professor and an ARC Australian Laureate Fellow at The University of Melbourne. He is also Deputy Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence on “Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology”. He received his PhD degree in 1994 from The University of Melbourne, and from 1994-1997 was at the CSIRO Division of Chemicals and Polymers in Melbourne. He was an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow and group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces (Berlin, Germany) from 1997–2002. From 2003-2012 he was an ARC Federation Fellow at The University of Melbourne. He has published over 400 peer-reviewed papers. He is one of Thomson Reuters’ Highly Cited Researchers (top 20 in materials science) and was on Thomson Reuters’ 2014 list of World's Most Influential Scientific Minds. He is an Editor of Chemistry of Materials and on the Editorial Advisory Board of ten other scientific journals. He was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science in 2009. 9 Version 1 2017 Senior Lecturer Greg Martin Greg Martin completed his undergraduate degree at Queen’s University in Canada, and Masters and PhD degrees from The University of Melbourne. In between this study he spent several years working as an engineer in the oil fields of Kansas and Sumatra and as a research scientist for a biotech company in Canada commercialising lignocellulosic ethanol production. His research interests lie in bioprocess engineering with a particular focus on microalgal biotechnology and dairy processing Professor Ray Dagastine Ray obtained his Bachelor of Chemical Engineering with Distinction at the University of Delaware in the USA and his PhD in Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University in the USA before moving to Australia for a 2 year research fellowship in Australia in 2002. He is now an Associate Professor and Reader in the department. Ray has previously worked in research in industrial adhesives and at a membrane separations start up company. Ray's research focuses on the interactions between particles, drops and bubbles in product engineering for the formulation and stability of dispersions (such as paint), emulsions (such as milk, shampoo or even ice cream) and foams (well...in foams....and also ice cream) as well as how drops and bubbles are important in chemical engineering processes. He teaches into Advanced Heat and Mass Transport Processes and Engineering Systems Design 1. Senior Lecturer Anthony Anthony Stickland obtained undergraduate (BSci, BE) and PhD Stickland degrees at the University of Melbourne. After completing his PhD in 2005, he worked for 4 years with ICI (and later AkzoNobel after merging) at their corporate research centre in Wilton, UK, and later their coil coating research and development centre in Sunshine, Victoria. In mid-2009, he returned to the department as a Research Fellow. He has had a permanent position as Senior Lecturer since 2012 and currently lectures Advanced Thermodynamics and Reactor Engineering and Particle Mechanics and Processing. Anthony’s research interests are in suspension rheology and solid-liquid separation, with current projects covering the fundamentals of suspension shear rheology through to designing a new dewatering device that combines shear with dewatering. The industrial applications include wastewater treatment sludges, water treatment sludges, minerals tailings, algal biomass and paper recycling process streams, amongst others. 10 Version 1 2017 Senior Lecturer Luke Connal Luke Connal received a bachelor’s of Chemical Engineering in 2002 and a PhD 2007 both from the University of Melbourne. In 2009 he was a joint Sir Keith Murdoch postdoctoral Fellow and Australian Linkage International Fellow at University of California Santa Barbra with Prof Craig Hawker. In 2013 Luke has returned to the University of Melbourne as a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. His research interests lie in the development of bioinspired materials using advanced polymer design, self-assembly, catalysis and 3D printing. The materials find use in applications from self-healing coatings and detergents to anti chemical warfare agents. Lecturer Chris Honig Chris Honig is a teaching focused academic. He obtained his undergraduate degree and PhD from the University of Melbourne in Chemical Engineering. He worked in a postdoctoral position at Virginia Tech in the USA, developing a new type of microscope, before returning to Melbourne in 2011. His research background is primarily in nano-scale microfluidics and atomic force microscopy. Chris teaches Chemical Process Analysis and Process Engineering. Lecturer Daniel Heath Daniel moved to Australia in 2014 in order to join the University of Melbourne as a Lecturer. Originally from the United States, Daniel completed his PhD at The Ohio State University before continuing his research as a postdoc with the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and MIT. Since arriving at Melbourne, he has taught Fluid Mechanics and Process Dynamics and Control. His research is related to developing new materials for use in medical applications. He also has an unhealthy obsession with his cat, Fudge, who you will all meet while Daniel is teaching you. 11 Version 1 2017 Deputy Head and Associate I completed a Mechanical Engineering degree at the University of Professor Dalton Harvie Sydney in the early 90s, sponsored by an industry funded scholarship. During the degree I did vacation work at BHP (steel smelting and rolling), NSW Electricity Commission (coal fired power plants) and Alcan (rolling aluminium foil). After graduation I resisted becoming a practicing engineer, and instead worked as a gardener and barman. However, if born an engineer you have to remain an engineer, so one year after graduation I found myself enrolled in a PhD program, studying the extinguishment of bush fires. Initially I performed experiments on extinguishing wooden cribs and determining the heat transfer rate to impacting water sprays, however there were fundamental questions that we just couldn’t answer via experimentation. I turned to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) to simulate the processes and complement the experiments. Simulation remains at the core of my present day research which involves using novel numerical methods to solve multiphysics flow problems, across a diverse spectrum of areas, ranging from optimising the blowing of a glass bottle (heat transfer) through to designing new analytical techniques for protein trapping (fluid dynamics and mass transfer). I became a lecturer here in the department in 2007, and now teach Transport Processes and Process Engineering Case Studies. 12 Version 1 2017 SAFETY The Melbourne School of Engineering is committed to providing and maintaining a workplace that is safe and without risk to the health of our staff, students and visitors to our facilities. The management of the School will take all measures necessary to ensure adherence to safe work practices and conditions and these will be given priority in the School's planning, procedures and work instructions. The creation and maintenance of a safe and healthy working environment is an integral part of our operation and we actively pursue the goals of this policy. The University follows the National Assessment Tool (NAT) program to ensure that these goals are achieved and the Melbourne School of Engineering is committed to maintaining its accreditation under this program. It is expected that, through consultation and co-operation, all staff, students, contractors and visitors will observe OHS rules and safe working practices and make every effort to reduce the risk of injury to themselves, their fellow workers and others. The management of the Melbourne School of Engineering is committed to the provision of appropriate resources and training in order to assist all staff and students to fulfil their responsibilities and maintain a safe working environment. Emergency Contact Information UoM Security Emergency phone number: 8344 6666 (internal extension 46666) Enquiry phone number: 8344 4674 Note: UoM Security Guards are trained first aiders and can be called upon to supply first aid in an after-hours emergency situation. MSE Occupational Health and Safety Unit Emergency phone number: 8344 2400 (internal extension 42400): business hours only. Ambulance, Police or Fire Brigade From a university phone: 0-000 From a mobile phone: 000 or 112 Tell the Emergency Services to enter the University via Gate 10 Grattan St. 13 Version 1 2017 14 Version 1 2017 15 Version 1 2017 YOUR STUDENT SERVICES For more Information: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/finder 16 Version 1 2017 RESEARCH IN THE DEPARTMENT The Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering has a large and diverse research program, which focuses on three key scientific themes: materials science, separations technologies, and biomolecular engineering. These scientific themes are targeted at key socioeconomic fields which include medicine, mining, sustainable energy production, water conservation and re-use and food processing. Examples of current research activities include investigation into soil remediation in Antarctica, production of biofuel from algae, reduction of evaporation in water catchments, new materials for carbon capture and storage, targeted drug and vaccine delivery and cheese microstructure. The Department is home to several major research centres: • Particulate Fluids Processing Centre (PFPC) • Peter Cook Centre for Carbon Capture and Storage Research • Dairy Innovation Hub: Transformational Research to Underpin the Future of the Australian Dairy Manufacturing Industry • Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-nano Science and Technology Interested in Further Study by Research? Who should apply? Successful applicants for admission to research and scholarships with Engineering & IT will typically: • have secured strong support from their nominated supervisor • be placed in the top 5% of their graduating class • have evidence of research potential by having completed a research project as part of their final year of their Bachelors or Master degree Before you apply, find a supervisor As a research student you will work under the guidance of an academic supervisor. Your supervisor will provide advice and direction throughout your research project. Your PhD project is often part of a larger project run by your supervisor. It is your responsibility to identify a supervisor you would like to work with, prior to making an application. You must supply documented evidence that you have secured a supervisor, who has agreed to work with you on your research proposal. Further details on the application process and Research Scholarships can be found at: http://www.eng.unimelb.edu.au/study/research/ 17 Version 1 2017 STUDY ABROAD, EXCHANGE AND OVERSEAS RESEARCH EXPERIENCE By taking part in an exchange or study abroad program you could immerse yourself in a different social, cultural and intellectual milieu, with the chance to add an international perspective to your studies. There are a number of ways you can do this. You may study overseas either as an ‘exchange’ student or a ‘study abroad’ student. With an approved study plan, either program can provide you with credit or fulfill academic requirements. There are also opportunities to complete your research project or your industry project overseas, in a six week full time placement over the summer break. We may also advertise an opportunity to complete a Research Project in China over the winter break and the first few weeks of Semester 2. There is also a wide variety of funding available to assist you with your plans for overseas study. Why Study Overseas? There are a number of reasons why you may wish to consider study abroad or exchange. Your reasons can be based on academic, personal, career aspirations or all of the above. 1. Gain a global perspective on your studies Study at an international university and gain a different perspective on your studies. 2. Challenge yourself Gain real independence and build your self-confidence 3. Make some international connections Build links by meeting new people 4. Improve your language skills Immerse yourself in another culture and either refine your foreign language skills or learn a new language Student Exchange Information Sessions A variety of information sessions for students are run regularly throughout the semester. General information sessions are a first step to hear more about the varied opportunities available around the world. They are intended to provide a general overview about how to undertake part of your studies overseas, and get you thinking about where in the world you would like to go. Further Information Global Mobility Coordinator, Engineering & IT Elizabeth Hunter E: eng-exchangeunimelb.edu.au 18 Version 1 2017 VACATION WORK The Department strongly recommends that you obtain vacation work with an engineering employer. This work is of greatest value at the end of your penultimate year, but is highly valuable at any stage of your degree program. Vacation work is advertised by major companies within Australia during the period March to July. These positions are highly competitive. Other companies may also offer vacation work informally and you will need to approach these companies yourself. If you are an overseas student, you may find it easier to gain an internship in your home country. Please contact the Academic Support Coordinator for advice on companies in your country who you could approach. Please ensure that your cover letter and Resume is checked by others before you use it. You will not get past the first round if these documents contain spelling mistakes or incorrect grammar. Further advice on vacation work and careers can be obtained from: http://careers.unimelb.edu.au/student/what_can_i_do_with_my_degree/career_planning https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5tBO1NUL0EA In some cases, you may be able to use your vacation work as credit towards ENGR90033 (see page 22). However, to do so the university must first sign an agreement with your intended employer. This means that you need to notify the Engineering Placements team at least one month in advance of the intended work to determine whether this is possible. Upon completion of vacation work, or relevant work experience, please complete the form on the next page and get your company supervisor to also comment and sign. This document can then be kept by both the Department and yourself as a permanent record of your experience. 19 Version 1 2017 20 Version 1 2017

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