IEEE Standard for Ethernet

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IEEE Standard for Ethernet IEEE Computer Society Sponsored by the LAN/MAN Standards Committee IEEE IEEE Std 802.3™-2012 3 Park Avenue (Revision of New York, NY 10016-5997 IEEE Std 802.3-2008) USA 28 December 2012 IEEE Standard for Ethernet Section One: This section includes Clause 1 through Clause 20, Annex A through Annex H, and Annex 4A. IMPORTANT NOTICE: IEEE Standards documents are not intended to ensure safety, health, or environmental protection, or ensure against interference with or from other devices or networks. Implementers of IEEE Standards documents are responsible for determining and complying with all appropriate safety, security, environmental, health, and interference protection practices and all applicable laws and regulations. This IEEE document is made available for use subject to important notices and legal disclaimers. These notices and disclaimers appear in all publications containing this document and may be found under the heading “Important Notice” or “Important Notices and Disclaimers Concerning IEEE Documents.” They can also be obtained on request from IEEE or viewed at http://standards.ieee.org/IPR/ disclaimers.html. 1. Introduction 1.1 Overview This is an international standard for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks (LANs and MANs), employing CSMA/CD as the shared media access method and the IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet) protocol and frame format for data communication. This international standard is intended to encompass several media types and tech- niques for a variety of MAC data rates as shown in Figure 1–1 and in 4.4.2. 1.1.1 Scope This standard defines Ethernet local area, access and metropolitan area networks. Ethernet is specified at selected speeds of operation; and uses a common media access control (MAC) specification and management information base (MIB). The Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) MAC protocol specifies shared medium (half duplex) operation, as well as full duplex operation. Speed specific Media Independent Interfaces (MIIs) provide an architectural and optional implementation interface to selected Physical Layer entities (PHY). The Physical Layer encodes frames for transmission and decodes received frames with the modulation specified for the speed of operation, transmission medium and supported link length. Other specified capabilities include: control and management protocols, and the provision of power over selected twisted pair PHY types. Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved. 1IEEE Std 802.3-2012 SECTION ONE IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET 1.1.2 Basic concepts This standard provides for two distinct modes of operation: half duplex and full duplex. A given IEEE 802.3 instantiation operates in either half or full duplex mode at any one time. The term “CSMA/CD MAC” is used throughout this standard synonymously with “802.3 MAC,” and may represent an instance of either a half duplex or full duplex mode data terminal equipment (DTE), even though full duplex mode DTEs do not implement the CSMA/CD algorithms traditionally used to arbitrate access to shared-media LANs. 1.1.2.1 Half duplex operation In half duplex mode, the CSMA/CD media access method is the means by which two or more stations share a common transmission medium. To transmit, a station waits (defers) for a quiet period on the medium (that is, no other station is transmitting) and then sends the intended message in bit-serial form. If, after initiating a transmission, the message collides with that of another station, then each transmitting station intentionally transmits for an additional predefined period to ensure propagation of the collision throughout the system. The station remains silent for a random amount of time (backoff) before attempting to transmit again. Each aspect of this access method process is specified in detail in subsequent clauses of this standard. Half duplex operation can be used with certain media types and configurations as defined by this standard. For allowable configurations, see 4.4.2. 1.1.2.2 Full duplex operation Full duplex operation allows simultaneous communication between a pair of stations using point-to-point media (dedicated channel). Full duplex operation does not require that transmitters defer, nor do they moni- tor or react to receive activity, as there is no contention for a shared medium in this mode. Full duplex mode can only be used when all of the following are true: a) The physical medium is capable of supporting simultaneous transmission and reception without interference. b) There are exactly two stations connected with a full duplex point-to-point link. Since there is no con- tention for use of a shared medium, the multiple access (i.e., CSMA/CD) algorithms are unnecessary. c) Both stations on the LAN are capable of, and have been configured to use, full duplex operation. The most common configuration envisioned for full duplex operation consists of a central bridge (also known as a switch) with a dedicated LAN connecting each bridge port to a single device. Repeaters as defined in this standard are outside the scope of full duplex operation. Full duplex operation constitutes a proper subset of the MAC functionality required for half duplex operation. 1.1.3 Architectural perspectives There are two important ways to view network design corresponding to the following: a) Architecture. Emphasizing the logical divisions of the system and how they fit together. b) Implementation. Emphasizing actual components, their packaging, and interconnection. This standard is organized along architectural lines, emphasizing the large-scale separation of the system into two parts: the Media Access Control (MAC) sublayer of the Data Link Layer and the Physical Layer. These layers are intended to correspond closely to the lowest layers of the ISO/IEC Model for Open Systems 1 Interconnection (see Figure 1–1). (See ISO/IEC 7498-1:1994. ) The Logical Link Control (LLC) sublayer 1 For information about references, see 1.3. 2 Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved.IEEE Std 802.3-2012 IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET SECTION ONE and MAC sublayer together encompass the functions intended for the Data Link Layer as defined in the OSI model. LAN OSI CSMA/CD REFERENCE LAYERS MODEL HIGHER LAYERS LAYERS APPLICATION LLC (LOGICAL LINK CONTROL) OR OTHER MAC CLIENT PRESENTATION MAC CONTROL (OPTIONAL) SESSION MAC — MEDIA ACCESS CONTROL RECONCILIATION PLS RECONCILIATION TRANSPORT MII xMII NETWORK PLS PCS PHY AUI AUI DATA LINK PMA MAU PMD PMA PMA PHYSICAL MDI MDI MDI MEDIUM MEDIUM MEDIUM ≥ 100 Mb/s 1 Mb/s, 10 Mb/s 10 Mb/s AUI = ATTACHMENT UNIT INTERFACE PCS = PHYSICAL CODING SUBLAYER PHY = PHYSICAL LAYER DEVICE MAU = MEDIUM ATTACHMENT UNIT PLS = PHYSICAL LAYER SIGNALING MDI = MEDIUM DEPENDENT INTERFACE PMA = PHYSICAL MEDIUM ATTACHMENT MII = MEDIA INDEPENDENT INTERFACE PMD = PHYSICAL MEDIUM DEPENDENT NOTE—In this figure, the xMII is used as a generic term for the Media Independent Interfaces for implementations of 100 Mb/s and above. For example: for 100 Mb/s implementations this interface is called MII; for 1 Gb/s implementa- tions it is called GMII; for 10 Gb/s implementations it is called XGMII; etc. Figure 1–1—IEEE 802.3 standard relationship to the ISO/IEC Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) reference model 1.1.3.1 Architectural rationale An architectural organization of the standard has two main advantages: a) Clarity. A clean overall division of the design along architectural lines makes the standard clearer. b) Flexibility. Segregation of medium-dependent aspects in the Physical Layer allows the LLC and MAC sublayers to apply to a family of transmission media. Partitioning the Data Link Layer allows various media access methods within the family of LAN standards. The architectural model is based on a set of interfaces that may be different from those emphasized in implementations. One critical aspect of the design, however, shall be addressed largely in terms of the implementation interfaces: compatibility. 1.1.3.2 Compatibility interfaces The following important compatibility interfaces are defined within what is architecturally the Physical Layer. a) Medium Dependent Interfaces (MDI). To communicate in a compatible manner, all stations shall adhere rigidly to the exact specification of physical media signals defined in the appropriate clauses in this standard, and to the procedures that define correct behavior of a station. The medium-inde- pendent aspects of the LLC sublayer and the MAC sublayer should not be taken as detracting from Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved. 3IEEE Std 802.3-2012 SECTION ONE IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET this point; communication in an Ethernet Local Area Network requires complete compatibility at the Physical Medium interface (that is, the physical cable interface). b) Attachment Unit Interface (AUI). Some DTEs are located some distance from their connection to the physical cable. A small amount of circuitry will exist in the Medium Attachment Unit (MAU) directly adjacent to the physical cable, while the majority of the hardware and all of the software will be placed within the DTE. The AUI is defined as a second compatibility interface. While confor- mance with this interface is not strictly necessary to ensure communication, it is recommended, since it allows maximum flexibility in intermixing MAUs and DTEs. The AUI may be optional or not specified for some implementations of this standard that are expected to be connected directly to the medium and so do not use a separate MAU or its interconnecting AUI cable. The PLS and PMA are then part of a single unit, and no explicit AUI implementation is required. c) Media Independent Interface (MII). It is anticipated that some DTEs will be connected to a remote PHY, and/or to different medium dependent PHYs. The MII is defined as a third compatibility inter- face. While conformance with implementation of this interface is not strictly necessary to ensure communication, it is recommended, since it allows maximum flexibility in intermixing PHYs and DTEs. The MII is optional. d) Gigabit Media Independent Interface (GMII). The GMII is designed to connect a 1 Gb/s capable MAC or repeater unit to a 1 Gb/s PHY. While conformance with implementation of this interface is not strictly necessary to ensure communication, it is recommended, since it allows maximum flexi- bility in intermixing PHYs and DTEs at 1 Gb/s speeds. The GMII is intended for use as a chip-to- chip interface. No mechanical connector is specified for use with the GMII. The GMII is optional. e) Ten-bit Interface (TBI). The TBI is provided by the 1000BASE-X PMA sublayer as a physical instantiation of the PMA service interface. The TBI is recommended for 1000BASE-X systems, since it provides a convenient partition between the high-frequency circuitry associated with the PMA sublayer and the logic functions associated with the PCS and MAC sublayers. The TBI is intended for use as a chip-to-chip interface. No mechanical connector is specified for use with the TBI. The TBI is optional. f) 10 Gigabit Media Independent Interface (XGMII). The XGMII is designed to connect a 10 Gb/s capable MAC to a 10 Gb/s PHY. While conformance with implementation of this interface is not necessary to ensure communication, it allows maximum flexibility in intermixing PHYs and DTEs at 10 Gb/s speeds. The XGMII is intended for use as a chip-to-chip interface. No mechanical con- nector is specified for use with the XGMII. The XGMII is optional. g) 10 Gigabit Attachment Unit Interface (XAUI). The XAUI is designed to extend the connection between a 10 Gb/s capable MAC and a 10 Gb/s PHY. While conformance with implementation of this interface is not necessary to ensure communication, it is recommended, since it allows maxi- mum flexibility in intermixing PHYs and DTEs at 10 Gb/s speeds. The XAUI is intended for use as a chip-to-chip interface. No mechanical connector is specified for use with the XAUI. The XAUI is optional. h) 10 Gigabit Sixteen-Bit Interface (XSBI). The XSBI is provided as a physical instantiation of the PMA service interface for 10GBASE-R and 10GBASE-W PHYs. While conformance with imple- mentation of this interface is not necessary to ensure communication, it provides a convenient parti- tion between the high-frequency circuitry associated with the PMA sublayer and the logic functions associated with the PCS and MAC sublayers. No mechanical connector is specified for use with the XSBI. The XSBI is optional. i) 40 Gigabit Media Independent Interface (XLGMII). The XLGMII is designed to connect a 40 Gb/s capable MAC to a 40 Gb/s PHY. While conformance with implementation of this interface is not necessary to ensure communication, it allows flexibility in intermixing PHYs and DTEs at 40 Gb/s speeds. The XLGMII is a logical interconnection intended for use as an intra-chip interface. No mechanical connector is specified for use with the XLGMII. The XLGMII is optional. j) 40 Gigabit Attachment Unit Interface (XLAUI). The XLAUI is a physical instantiation of the PMA service interface to extend the connection between 40 Gb/s capable PMAs. While conformance with 4 Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved.IEEE Std 802.3-2012 IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET SECTION ONE implementation of this interface is not necessary to ensure communication, it is recommended, since it allows maximum flexibility in intermixing PHYs and DTEs at 40 Gb/s speeds. The XLAUI is intended for use as a chip-to-chip or a chip-to-module interface. No mechanical connector is specified for use with the XLAUI. The XLAUI is optional. k) 40 Gigabit Parallel Physical Interface (XLPPI). The XLPPI is provided as a physical instantiation of the PMD service interface for 40GBASE-SR4 and 40GBASE-LR4 PMDs. The XLPPI has four lanes. While conformance with implementation of this interface is not necessary to ensure communication, it allows flexibility in connecting the 40GBASE-SR4 or 40GBASE-LR4 PMDs. The XLPPI is intended for use as a chip-to-module interface. No mechanical connector is specified for use with the XLPPI. The XLPPI is optional. l) 100 Gigabit Media Independent Interface (CGMII). The CGMII is designed to connect a 100 Gb/s capable MAC to a 100 Gb/s PHY. While conformance with implementation of this interface is not necessary to ensure communication, it allows flexibility in intermixing PHYs and DTEs at 100 Gb/s speeds. The CGMII is a logical interconnection intended for use as an intra-chip interface. No mechanical connector is specified for use with the CGMII. The CGMII is optional. m) 100 Gigabit Attachment Unit Interface (CAUI). The CAUI is a physical instantiation of the PMA service interface to extend the connection between 100 Gb/s capable PMAs. While conformance with implementation of this interface is not necessary to ensure communication, it is recommended, since it allows maximum flexibility in intermixing PHYs and DTEs at 100 Gb/s speeds. The CAUI is intended for use as a chip-to-chip or a chip-to-module interface. No mechanical connector is specified for use with the CAUI. The CAUI is optional. n) 100 Gigabit Parallel Physical Interface (CPPI). The CPPI is provided as a physical instantiation of the PMD service interface for 100GBASE-SR10 PMDs. The CPPI has ten lanes. While conformance with implementation of this interface is not necessary to ensure communication, it allows flexibility in connecting the 100GBASE-SR10 PMDs. The CPPI is intended for use as a chip-to-module interface. No mechanical connector is specified for use with the CPPI. The CPPI is optional. Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved. 5IEEE Std 802.3-2012 SECTION ONE IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET 1.1.4 Layer interfaces In the architectural model used here, the layers interact by way of well-defined interfaces, providing services as specified in Clause 2 and Clause 6. In general, the interface requirements are as follows: a) The interface between the MAC sublayer and its client includes facilities for transmitting and receiving frames, and provides per-operation status information for use by higher-layer error recov- ery procedures. b) The interface between the MAC sublayer and the Physical Layer includes signals for framing (carrier sense, receive data valid, transmit initiation) and contention resolution (collision detect), facilities for passing a pair of serial bit streams (transmit, receive) between the two layers, and a wait function for timing. These interfaces are described more precisely in 4.3. Additional interfaces are necessary to provide for MAC Control services, and to allow higher level network management facilities to interact with these layers to perform operation, maintenance, and planning functions. Network management functions are described in Clause 30. 1.1.5 Application areas Use of this standard is not restricted to any specific environments or applications. In the context of this standard, the term “LAN” is used to indicate all networks that utilize the IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet) protocol for communication. These may include (but are not limited to) LANs and MANs. 1.2 Notation 1.2.1 State diagram conventions The operation of a protocol can be described by subdividing the protocol into a number of interrelated func- tions. The operation of the functions can be described by state diagrams. Each diagram represents the domain of a function and consists of a group of connected, mutually exclusive states. Only one state of a function is active at any given time (see Figure 1–2). STATE NAME MESSAGE SENT TERMS TO ENTER TERMS TO EXIT · STATE .. (CONDITION) STATE · ACTIONS TAKEN Key: ( ) = condition, for example, (if no_collision) = action, for example, reset PLS functions = logical AND + = logical OR, arithmetic addition Tw = Wait Time, implementation dependent Td = Delay Timeout Tb = Backoff Timeout UCT = unconditional transition Figure 1–2—State diagram notation example 6 Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved.IEEE Std 802.3-2012 IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET SECTION ONE Each state that the function can assume is represented by a rectangle. These are divided into two parts by a horizontal line. In the upper part the state is identified by a name in capital letters. The lower part contains the name of any ON signal that is generated by the function. Actions are described by short phrases and enclosed in brackets. All permissible transitions between the states of a function are represented graphically by arrows between them. A transition that is global in nature (for example, an exit condition from all states to the IDLE or RESET state) is indicated by an open arrow. Labels on transitions are qualifiers that must be fulfilled before the transition will be taken. The label UCT designates an unconditional transition. Qualifiers described by short phrases are enclosed in parentheses. State transitions and sending and receiving of messages occur instantaneously. When a state is entered and the condition to leave that state is not immediately fulfilled, the state executes continuously, sending the messages and executing the actions contained in the state in a continuous manner. Some devices described in this standard (e.g., repeaters) are allowed to have two or more ports. State dia- grams that are capable of describing the operation of devices with an unspecified number of ports require a qualifier notation that allows testing for conditions at multiple ports. The notation used is a term that includes a description in parentheses of which ports must meet the term for the qualifier to be satisfied (e.g., ANY and ALL). It is also necessary to provide for term-assignment statements that assign a name to a port that satisfies a qualifier. The following conventions are used to describe a term-assignment statement that is associated with a transition: a) The character “:” (colon) is a delimiter used to denote that a term assignment statement follows. b) The character “⇐” (left arrow) denotes assignment of the value following the arrow to the term pre- ceding the arrow. The state diagrams contain the authoritative statement of the functions they depict; when apparent conflicts between descriptive text and state diagrams arise, the state diagrams are to take precedence. This does not override, however, any explicit description in the text that has no parallel in the state diagrams. The models presented by state diagrams are intended as the primary specifications of the functions to be pro- vided. It is important to distinguish, however, between a model and a real implementation. The models are optimized for simplicity and clarity of presentation, while any realistic implementation may place heavier emphasis on efficiency and suitability to a particular implementation technology. It is the functional behav- ior of any unit that must match the standard, not its internal structure. The internal details of the model are useful only to the extent that they specify the external behavior clearly and precisely. 1.2.2 Service specification method and notation The service of a layer or sublayer is the set of capabilities that it offers to a user in the next higher (sub)layer. Abstract services are specified here by describing the service primitives and parameters that characterize each service. This definition of service is independent of any particular implementation (see Figure 1–3). Specific implementations may also include provisions for interface interactions that have no direct end-to- end effects. Examples of such local interactions include interface flow control, status requests and indications, error notifications, and layer management. Specific implementation details are omitted from this service specification both because they will differ from implementation to implementation and because they do not impact the peer-to-peer protocols. Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved. 7IEEE Std 802.3-2012 SECTION ONE IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET LAYER N LAYER N SERVICE USER SERVICE USER LAYER N-1 SERVICE PROVIDER TIME REQUEST INDICATION Figure 1–3—Service primitive notation 1.2.2.1 Classification of service primitives Primitives are of two generic types: a) REQUEST. The request primitive is passed from layer N to layer N-1 to request that a service be ini- tiated. b) INDICATION. The indication primitive is passed from layer N-1 to layer N to indicate an internal layer N-1 event that is significant to layer N. This event may be logically related to a remote service request, or may be caused by an event internal to layer N-1. The service primitives are an abstraction of the functional specification and the user-layer interaction. The abstract definition does not contain local detail of the user/provider interaction. For instance, it does not indi- cate the local mechanism that allows a user to indicate that it is awaiting an incoming call. Each primitive has a set of zero or more parameters, representing data elements that shall be passed to qualify the functions invoked by the primitive. Parameters indicate information available in a user/provider interaction; in any particular interface, some parameters may be explicitly stated (even though not explicitly defined in the primitive) or implicitly associated with the service access point. Similarly, in any particular protocol specifi- cation, functions corresponding to a service primitive may be explicitly defined or implicitly available. 1.2.3 Physical Layer and media notation Users of this standard need to reference which particular implementation is being used or identified. There- fore, a means of identifying each implementation is given by a simple, three-field, type notation that is explicitly stated at the beginning of each relevant clause. In general, the Physical Layer type is specified by these fields: data rate modulation type additional distinction The data rate, if only a number, is in Mb/s, and if suffixed by a “G”, is in Gb/s. The modulation type (e.g., BASE) indicates how encoded data is transmitted on the medium. The additional distinction may identify characteristics of transmission or medium and, in some cases, the type of PCS encoding used (examples of additional distinctions are “T” for twisted pair, “B” for bidirectional optics, and “X” for a block PCS coding used for that speed of operation). Expansions for defined Physical Layer types are included in 1.4. 8 Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved.IEEE Std 802.3-2012 IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET SECTION ONE 1.2.4 Physical Layer message notation Messages generated within the Physical Layer, either within or between PLS and the MAU (that is, PMA circuitry), are designated by an italic type to designate either form of physical or logical message used to execute the Physical Layer signaling process (for example, input_idle or mau_available). 1.2.5 Hexadecimal notation Numerical values designated by the 0x prefix indicate a hexadecimal interpretation of the corresponding number. For example: 0x0F represents an 8-bit hexadecimal value of the decimal number 15; 0x00000000 represents a 32-bit hexadecimal value of the decimal number 0; etc. Numerical values designated with a 16 subscript indicate a hexadecimal interpretation of the corresponding number. For example: 0F represents an 8-bit hexadecimal value of the decimal number 15. 16 1.2.6 Accuracy and resolution of numerical quantities Unless otherwise stated, numerical limits in this standard are to be taken as exact, with the number of signif- icant digits and trailing zeros having no significance. 1.3 Normative references The following standards contain provisions that, through reference in this text, constitute provisions of this standard. Standards may be subject to revision, and parties subject to agreements based on this standard are encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying the most recent editions of the standards indicated below. Members of IEC and ISO maintain registers of currently valid international standards. For undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments or corrigenda) applies. ANSI T1.269-2000, Information Interchange—Structure and Representation of Trace Message Formats For 2 The North American Telecommunications System. ANSI T1.417-2001, Spectrum Management for Loop Transmission Systems. ANSI T1.424-2004, Interface between networks and customer installations—Very-high Speed Digital Subscriber Lines (VDSL) Metallic Interface (Trial-Use Standard). ANSI T1.601-1992, Telecommunications—Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN)—Basic Access Interface for Use on Metallic Loops for Application on the Network Side of the NT (Layer 1 Specification). ANSI T1.605-1991, Telecommunications—Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN)—Basic Access Interface for S and T Reference Point (Layer 1 Specification). ANSI X3.230-1994 (FC-PH), Information Technology—Fibre Channel—Physical and Signaling Interface. ANSI X3.263-1995, Revision 2.2 (1 March 1995), FDDI Twisted Pair—Physical Medium Dependent (TP- PMD). ANSI/TIA-568-C.0-2010, Generic Telecommunications Cabling. ANSI/TIA-568-C.2-2010, Copper Cabling Components. 2 ANSI publications are available the American National Standards Institute (http://www.ansi.org). Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved. 9IEEE Std 802.3-2012 SECTION ONE IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET ANSI/TIA-568-C.3-2008, Optical Fiber Cabling Components Standard. ANSI/TIA/EIA-455-175A-92, Chromatic Dispersion Measurement of Single-Mode Optical Fibers by the Differential Phase-Shift Method. ANSI/TIA/EIA-455-203-2001, Launched Power Distribution Measurement Procedure for Graded-Index Multimode Transmitters. ANSI/TIA/EIA-455-204-2000, Measurement of Bandwidth on Multimode Fiber. ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-A-1995, Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling Standard. ATIS-0600416.1999(R2010), Network to Customer Installation Interfaces—Synchronous Optical NETwork 3 (SONET)—Physical Layer Specification: Common Criteria. ATIS-0900105.2008, Synchronous Optical Network (SONET)—Basic Description including Multiplex Structure, Rates, and Formats. CISPR 22: 1993, Limits and Methods of Measurement of Radio Interference Characteristics of Information 4 Technology Equipment. 5 EIA/JEDEC Standard EIA/JESD8-6, High Speed Transceiver Logic (HSTL), August 1995. ETSI TS 101 270-1 (1999), Transmission and Multiplexing (TM); Access transmission systems on metallic 6 access cables; Very high speed Digital Subscriber Line (VDSL); Part 1: Functional requirements. 7 IEC 60060 (all parts), High-voltage test techniques. IEC 60068, Basic environmental testing procedures. IEC 60096-1:1986, Radio-frequency cables, Part 1: General requirements and measuring methods and Amd. 2:1993. IEC 60169-16:1982, Radio-frequency connectors, Part 16: R.F. coaxial connectors with inner diameter of outer conductor 7 mm (0.276 in) with screw coupling—Characteristic impedance 50 ohms (75 ohms) (Type N). IEC 60603-7:1990, Connectors for frequencies below 3 MHz for use with printed boards, Part 7: Detail specification for connectors, 8-way, including fixed and free connectors with common mating features, with assessed quality. IEC 60793-1:1992, Optical fibres—Part 1: Generic specification. IEC 60793-1:1995, Optical fibres—Part 1: Generic specification. IEC 60793-1-41:2001, Optical fibres—Part 1-41: Measurement methods and test procedures—Bandwidth. 3 ATIS publication are available from the Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions (http://atis.org). 4 CISPR documents are available from the International Electrotechnical Commission (http://www.iec.ch/). CISPR documents are also available in the United States from the American National Standards Institute (http://www.ansi.org). 5 EIA publications are available from the IHS Standards Store (http://global.ihs.com/). JEDEC publications are available from the JEDEC Solid State Technology Association (http://www.jedec.org). 6 ETSI publications are available the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (http://www.etsi.org). 7 IEC publications are available from the International Electrotechnical Commission (http://www.iec.ch/). IEC publications are also available in the United States from the American National Standards Institute (http://www.ansi.org). 10 Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved.IEEE Std 802.3-2012 IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET SECTION ONE IEC 60793-1-42:2007, Optical fibres—Part 1-42: Measurement methods and test procedures—Chromatic dispersion. IEC 60793-1-48:2007, Optical fibres—Part 1-48: Measurement methods and test procedures—Polarization mode dispersion. IEC 60793-2:1992, Optical fibres—Part 2: Product specifications. IEC 60793-2-10:2011, Optical fibres—Part 2-10: Product specifications—Sectional specification for category A1 multimode fibres. IEC 60793-2-50:2008, Optical fibres—Part 2-50: Product specifications—Sectional specification for class B single-mode fibres. IEC 60794-1:1993, Optical fibre cables—Part 1: Generic specification. IEC 60794-1:1996, Optical fibre cables—Part 1: Generic specification. IEC 60794-2:1989, Optical fibre cables—Part 2: Product specifications. IEC 60794-2-11:2005, Optical fibre cables—Part 2-11: Indoor cables—Detailed specification for simplex and duplex cables for use in premises cabling. IEC 60794-3-12:2005, Optical fibre cables—Part 3-12: Outdoor fibre cables—Detailed specification for duct and directly buried optical telecommunication cables for use in premises cabling. IEC 60807-2:1992, Rectangular connectors for frequencies below 3 MHz, Part 2: Detail specification for a range of connectors with assessed quality, with trapezoidal shaped metal shells and round contacts—Fixed solder contact types. IEC 60807-3:1990, Rectangular connectors for frequencies below 3 MHz, Part 3: Detail specification for a range of connectors with trapezoidal shaped metal shells and round contacts—Removable crimp contact types with closed crimp barrels, rear insertion/rear extraction. IEC 60825-1, Safety of laser products—Part 1: Equipment classification and requirements. IEC 60825-2, Safety of laser products—Part 2: Safety of optical fibre communication systems (OFCS). IEC 60874-1:1993, Connectors for optical fibres and cables—Part 1: Generic specification. IEC 60874-2:1993, Connectors for optical fibres and cables—Part 2: Sectional specification for fibre optic connector, Type F-SMA. IEC 60874-10:1992, Connectors for optical fibres and cables—Part 10: Sectional specification, Fibre optic connector type BFOC/2,5. IEC 60950:1991, Safety of information technology equipment. IEC 60950-1, Information technology equipment—Safety—Part 1: General requirements. IEC 61076-3-101:1997, Connectors with assessed quality, for use in d.c., low-frequency analogue and in digital high-speed data applications—Part 3: Rectangular connectors—Section 101: Detail specification for a range of shielded connectors with trapezoidal shaped shells and non-removable rectangular contacts on a 1.27 mm × 2.54 mm centre-line. Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved. 11IEEE Std 802.3-2012 SECTION ONE IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET IEC 61076-3-113, Ed. 1.0 (draft, 48B/1437/CD, 2 April 2004.) 48B Secretariat 1327 Connectors for electronic equipment—Part 3-113: Screened, serial multi-conductor cable to board connectors suitable for 8 10 Gbit/sec data rates. IEC 61076-3-103 (48B/574/NP), Detail specification for rectangular connectors, with assessed quality, 6 and 8 way, fixed and free shielded connectors with ribbon contacts for high speed data applications. IEC 61196-1:1995, Radio-frequency cables—Part 1: Generic specification—General, definitions, requirements and test methods. IEC 61280-1-1:1998, Fibre optic communication subsystem basic test procedures—Part 1-1: Test procedures for general communication subsystems—Transmitter output optical power measurement for single-mode optical fibre cable. IEC 61280-1-3:2010, Fibre optic communication subsystem test procedures—Part 1-3: General communication subsystems—Central wavelength and spectral width measurement. IEC 61280-1-4:2003, Fibre optic communication subsystem test procedures—Part 1-4: General communication subsystems—Collection and reduction of two-dimensional nearfield data for multimode fibre laser transmitters. IEC 61280-1-4:2009, Fibre optic communication subsystem test procedures—Part 1-4: General communication subsystems—Light source encircled flux measurement method. IEC 61280-2-2:2008, Fiber optic communication sub-system basic test procedures—Part 2-2: Test procedures for digital systems—Optical eye pattern, waveform, and extinction ratio. IEC 61280-4-1:2003, Fiber-optic communication subsystem test procedures—Part 4-1: Cable plant and links—Multimode fibre-optic cable plant attenuation measurement. IEC 61280-4-1:2009, Fibre-optic communication subsystem test procedures—Part 4-1: Installed cable plant —Multimode attenuation measurement. IEC 61280-4-2:2000, Fibre optic communication subsystem basic test procedures—Fibre optic cable plant—Single-mode fibre optic cable plant attenuation. IEC 61753-1-1:2000, Fibre optic interconnecting devices and passive components performance standard— Part 1-1: General and guidance—Interconnecting devices (connectors). IEC 61753-021-2:2002, Fibre optic passive component performance standard—Part 021-2: Fibre optic connectors terminated on single-mode fibre to category C Controlled environment. IEC 61753-022-2, Performance standard—Part 022-2: Fibre optic connectors terminated on multimode fibre for Category C—Controlled environment, performance Class M. IEC 61754-1:1996, Fibre optic interfaces —Part 1: General and guidance. IEC 61754-4:1997, Fibre optic connector interfaces—Part 4: Type SC connector family. IEC 61754-7, Fibre optic connector interfaces—Part 7: Type MPO connector family. 8 At the time IEEE Std 802.3-2012 was published, IEC 61076-3-113 is a committee draft. This document is available at (http://www.bsigroup.com/). 12 Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved.IEEE Std 802.3-2012 IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET SECTION ONE 9,10 IEEE Std 1394™-1995 IEEE Standard for a High Performance Serial Bus. ® IEEE Std 802 , IEEE Standards for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks—Overview and Architecture. IEEE Std 802.1AB™-2009, IEEE Standard for Local and metropolitan area networks—Station and Media Access Control Connectivity Discovery. IEEE Std 802.1D™, IEEE Standard for Local and metropolitan area networks—Media Access Control (MAC) Bridges. IEEE Std 802.1F™-1993 (Reaff 1998), IEEE Standard for Local and metropolitan area networks—Common Definitions and Procedures for IEEE 802 Management Information. IEEE Std 802.1Q™, IEEE Standard for Local and metropolitan area networks—Virtual Bridged Local Area Networks. IEEE Std 802.3.1™-2011, IEEE Standard for Management Information Base (MIB) Module Definitions for Ethernet. IEEE Std 802.5v™-2001, IEEE Standard for Information Technology - Telecommunications and Information Exchange Between Systems - Local and Metropolitan Area Networks - Specific Requirements. Part 5: Token Ring Access Method and Physical Layer Specifications. Amendment 5: Gigabit Token Ring Operation. IEEE Std 802.9a™-1995, IEEE Standards for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks: Supplement to Integrated Services (IS) LAN Interface at the Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical (PHY) Layers: Specification of IsLAN16-T. 11 IETF RFC 3621 (December 2003), Power Ethernet MIB, Berger, A., and Romascanu, D. IETF RFC 4836 (April 2007), Definitions of Managed Objects for IEEE 802.3 Medium Attachment Units (MAUs), Beili, E. ISO/IEC 8802-2:1998, Information technology—Telecommunications and information exchange between 12 systems—Local and metropolitan area networks—Specific requirements—Part 2: Logical link control. ISO/IEC 7498-1:1994, Information technology—Open Systems Interconnection—Basic Reference Model: The Basic Model. ISO/IEC 7498-4:1989, Information processing systems—Open Systems Interconnection—Basic Reference Model—Part 4: Management Framework. ISO/IEC 8824:1990, Information technology—Open Systems Interconnection—Specification of Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1). ISO/IEC 9314-1:1989, Information processing systems—Fibre Distributed Data Interface (FDDI)—Part 1: Token Ring Physical Layer Protocol (PHY). 9 IEEE publications are available from The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (http://standards.ieee.org/). 10 The IEEE standards or products referred to in this clause are trademarks of The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. 11 IETF RFCs are available from the Internet Engineering Task Force (http://www.ietf.org/rfc.html). 12 ISO/IEC publications are available from the International Organization for Standardization (http://www.iso.ch/) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (http://www.iec.ch/). ISO/IEC publications are also available in the United States from the American National Standards Institute (http://www.ansi.org/). Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved. 13IEEE Std 802.3-2012 SECTION ONE IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET ISO/IEC 9314-2:1989, Information processing systems—Fibre Distributed Data Interface (FDDI)—Part 2: Token Ring Media Access Control (MAC). ISO/IEC 9314-3:1990, Information processing systems—Fibre Distributed Data Interface (FDDI)—Part 3: Physical Layer Medium Dependent (PMD). ISO/IEC 9646-1:1994, Information technology—Open Systems Interconnection—Conformance testing methodology and framework—Part 1: General concepts. ISO/IEC 9646-2:1994, Information technology—Open Systems Interconnection—Conformance testing methodology and framework—Part 2: Abstract test suite specification. ISO/IEC 10040:1992, Information technology—Open Systems Interconnection—Systems management overview. ISO/IEC 10165-2:1992, Information technology—Open Systems Interconnection—Structure of management information: Definition of management information. ISO/IEC 10165-4:1992, Information technology—Open Systems Interconnection—Management information services—Structure of management information—Part 4: Guidelines for the definition of managed objects. 13 ISO/IEC 11801:1995, Information technology—Generic cabling for customer premises. ISO/IEC 11801:2002, Information technology—Generic cabling for customer premises. ISO/IEC 11801:2002 Amendment 1:2008, Information technology—Generic cabling for customer premises. ISO/IEC 11801:2002 Amendment 2:2010, Information technology—Generic cabling for customer premises. ISO/IEC 15802-1:1995, Information technology—Telecommunications and information exchange between systems—Local and metropolitan area networks—Common specifications—Part 1: Medium Access Control (MAC) service definition. ISO/IEC TR 24750:2007, Information technology—Assessment and mitigation of installed balanced cabling channels in order to support of 10GBASE-T. ITU-T Recommendation G.650.1, 2010—Definitions and test methods for linear, deterministic attributes of 14 single-mode fibre and cable. ITU-T Recommendation G.652, 2009—Characteristics of a single-mode optical fibre and cable. ITU-T Recommendation G.657, 2009—Characteristics of a bending-loss insensitive single-mode optical fibre and cable for the access network. ITU-T Recommendation G.671, 2009—Transmission characteristics of optical components and subsystems. ITU-T Recommendation G.691, 2006—Optical interfaces for single channel STM-64 and other SDH systems with optical amplifiers. ITU-T Recommendation G.694.1—Spectral grids for WDM applications: DWDM frequency grid. 13 Previous editions of ISO/IEC standards are available from Deutsches Institut für Normung (http://www.din.de). 14 ITU-T publications are available from the International Telecommunications Union (http://www.itu.int/). 14 Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved.IEEE Std 802.3-2012 IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET SECTION ONE ITU-T Recommendation G.694.2—Spectral grids for WDM applications: CWDM wavelength grid. ITU-T Recommendation G.695, 2010—Optical interfaces for coarse wavelength division multiplexing applications. ITU-T Recommendation G.957, 2006—Optical interfaces for equipments and systems relating to the synchronous digital hierarchy. ITU-T Recommendation G.959.1, 2009—Optical transport network physical layer interfaces. ITU-T Recommendation G.975—Forward error correction for submarine systems. ITU-T Recommendation G.991.2, 2001—Amendment 1. ITU-T Recommendation G.991.2, 2001—Single-pair high-speed digital subscriber line (SHDSL) transceivers. ITU-T Recommendation G.993.1, 2003—Amendment 1. ITU-T Recommendation G.993.1, 2001—Very high speed digital subscriber line foundation. ITU-T Recommendation G.994.1, 2004—Handshake procedures for digital subscriber line (DSL) transceivers. ITU-T Recommendation I.430, 1995—Basic user-network interface—Layer 1 specification. ITU-T Recommendation O.150, 1996—General requirements for instrumentation for performance measurements on digital transmission equipment. ITU-T Recommendation O.153, 1992—Basic parameters for the measurement of error performance at bit rates below the primary rate. ITU-T Recommendation O.172, 2005—Jitter and wander measuring equipment for digital systems which are based on the synchronous digital hierarchy (SDH). 15 MATLAB Matrix Laboratory Software. 16 SFF-8436, Rev 4.1, August 24, 2011, Specification for QSFP+ 10 Gbs 4X Pluggable Transceiver. SFF-8642, Rev 2.7, February 26, 2010, Specification for Mini Multilane 12 Gbs 12X Shielded Connector. 17 TIA-455-127-A-2006, FOTP-127-A, Basic Spectral Characterization of Laser Diodes. TIA TSB-155-A-2010, Guidelines for the Assessment and Mitigation of Installed Category 6 Cabling to Support 10GBASE-T. NOTE—Local and national standards such as those supported by ANSI, EIA, MIL, NFPA, and UL are not a formal part of this standard except where no international standard equivalent exists. A number of local and national standards are 18 referenced as resource material; these bibliographical references are located in the bibliography in Annex A. 15 For information on MatLab, contact The MathWorks (http://www.mathworks.com). 16 SFF specifications are available at ftp://ftp.seagate.com/sff. 17 TIA publications are available from the IHS Standards Store (http://global.ihs.com/) or from the Telecommunications Industry Association (http://www.tiaonline.org). 18 Notes in text, tables, and figures are given for information only and do not contain requirements needed to implement this standard. Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved. 15IEEE Std 802.3-2012 SECTION ONE IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET 1.4 Definitions For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply. The IEEE Standards 19 Dictionary: Glossary of Terms & Definitions should be referenced for terms not defined in this clause. 1.4.1 10BASE2: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 10 Mb/s CSMA/CD local area network over RG 58 coaxial cable. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 10.) 1.4.2 10BASE5: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 10 Mb/s CSMA/CD local area network over coaxial cable (i.e., thicknet). (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 8.) 1.4.3 10BASE-F: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 10 Mb/s CSMA/CD local area network over multimode fiber optic cable. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 15.) 1.4.4 10BASE-FB port: A port on a repeater that contains an internal 10BASE-FB Medium Attachment Unit (MAU) that can connect to a similar port on another repeater. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 9, Figure 15–1b, and Clause 17.) 1.4.5 10BASE-FB segment: A fiber optic link segment providing a point-to-point connection between two 10BASE-FB ports on repeaters. (See link segment IEEE Std 802.3, Figure 15–1b and Figure 15–2.) 1.4.6 10BASE-FL segment: A fiber optic link segment providing point-to-point connection between two 10BASE-FL Medium Attachment Units (MAUs). (See link segment IEEE Std 802.3, Figure 15–1c and Figure 15–2.) 1.4.7 10BASE-FP segment: A fiber optic mixing segment, including one 10BASE-FP Star and all of the attached fiber pairs. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Figure 15–1a, Figure 1–3, and mixing segment.) 1.4.8 10BASE-FP Star: A passive device that is used to couple fiber pairs together to form a 10BASE-FP segment. Optical signals received at any input port of the 10BASE-FP Star are distributed to all of its output ports (including the output port of the optical interface from which it was received). A 10BASE-FP Star is typically comprised of a passive-star coupler, fiber optic connectors, and a suitable mechanical housing. (See IEEE Std 802.3, 16.5.) 1.4.9 10BASE-T: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 10 Mb/s CSMA/CD local area network over two pairs of twisted-pair telephone wire. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 14.) 1.4.10 10BASE-Te: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for an energy-efficient version of 10BASE-T for a 10 Mb/s CSMA/CD local area network over two pairs of Category 5 or better-balanced cabling. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 14.) 1.4.11 10BROAD36: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 10 Mb/s CSMA/CD local area network over single broadband cable. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 11.) 1.4.12 10PASS-TS: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification up to 100 Mb/s point-to-point link over single copper wire pair. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 61 and Clause 62.) 19 The IEEE Standards Dictionary: Glossary of Terms & Definitions is available at http://shop.ieee.org/. 16 Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved.IEEE Std 802.3-2012 IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET SECTION ONE 1.4.13 100BASE-BX10: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 100 Mb/s point-to-point link over one single-mode fiber. The link includes two different specifications for 100BASE-BX10-D and 100BASE- BX10-U. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 58 and Clause 66.) 1.4.14 100BASE-FX: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 100 Mb/s CSMA/CD local area net- work over two multimode optical fibers. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 24 and Clause 26.) 1.4.15 100BASE-LX10: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 100 Mb/s point-to-point link over two single-mode optical fibers. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 58 and Clause 66.) 1.4.16 100BASE-T: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 100 Mb/s CSMA/CD local area network. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 22 and Clause 28.) 1.4.17 100BASE-T2: IEEE 802.3 specification for a 100 Mb/s CSMA/CD local area network over two pairs of Category 3 or better balanced cabling. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 32.) 1.4.18 100BASE-T4: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 100 Mb/s CSMA/CD local area net- work over four pairs of Category 3, 4, and 5 twisted-pair cabling. (See IEEE Std 802.3 Clause 23.) 1.4.19 100BASE-TX: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 100 Mb/s CSMA/CD local area net- work over two pairs of Category 5 twisted-pair cabling. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 24 and Clause 25.) 1.4.20 100BASE-X: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 100 Mb/s CSMA/CD local area network that uses the Physical Medium Dependent (PMD) sublayer and Medium Dependent Interface (MDI) of the ISO/IEC 9314 group of standards developed by ASC X3T12 (FDDI). (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 24.) 1.4.21 1000BASE-BX10: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 1000 Mb/s point-to-point link over one single-mode optical fiber. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 59 and Clause 66.) 1.4.22 1000BASE-CX: 1000BASE-X over specialty shielded balanced copper jumper cable assemblies. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 39.) 1.4.23 1000BASE-KX: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 1 Gb/s using 1000BASE-X encoding over an electrical backplane. (See IEEE Std 802.3 Clause 70.) 1.4.24 1000BASE-LX: 1000BASE-X using long wavelength laser devices over multimode and single-mode fiber. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 38.) 1.4.25 1000BASE-LX10: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 1000 Mb/s point-to-point link over two single-mode or multimode optical fibers. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 59 and Clause 66.) 1.4.26 1000BASE-PX10: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 1000 Mb/s point to multipoint link over one single-mode optical fiber, with a reach of up to 10 km. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 60, Clause 65, and Clause 66.) 1.4.27 1000BASE-PX20: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 1000 Mb/s point to multipoint link over one single-mode optical fiber, with a reach of up to 20 km. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 60, Clause 65, and Clause 66.) 1.4.28 1000BASE-SX: 1000BASE-X using short wavelength laser devices over multimode fiber. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 38.) 1.4.29 1000BASE-T: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 1000 Mb/s CSMA/CD LAN using four pairs of Category 5 balanced copper cabling. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 40.) Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved. 17IEEE Std 802.3-2012 SECTION ONE IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET 1.4.30 1000BASE-X: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 1000 Mb/s CSMA/CD LAN that uses a 20 Physical Layer derived from ANSI X3.230-1994 (FC-PH) B21 . (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 36.) 1.4.31 10GBASE-CX4: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 10 Gb/s using 10GBASE-X encoding over four lanes over shielded balanced copper cabling. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 54.) 1.4.32 10GBASE-E: IEEE 802.3 PMD specifications for 10 Gb/s serial transmission using extra long wave- length. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 52.) 1.4.33 10GBASE-ER: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 10 Gb/s using 10GBASE-R encoding and 10GBASE-E optics. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 49 and Clause 52.) 1.4.34 10GBASE-EW: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 10Gb/s using 10GBASE-W encoding and 10GBASE-E optics. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 50 and Clause 52.) 1.4.35 10GBASE-KR: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 10 Gb/s using 10GBASE-R encoding over an electrical backplane. (See IEEE Std 802.3 Clause 72.) 1.4.36 10GBASE-KX4: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 10 Gb/s using 10GBASE-X encoding over an electrical backplane. (See IEEE Std 802.3 Clause 71.) 1.4.37 10GBASE-L: IEEE 802.3 PMD specifications for 10 Gb/s serial transmission using long wave- length. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 52) 1.4.38 10GBASE-LR: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 10 Gb/s using 10GBASE-R encoding and 10GBASE-L optics. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 49 and Clause 52.) 1.4.39 10GBASE-LRM: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 10 Gb/s using 10GBASE-R encoding and long wavelength optics for multimode fiber (See IEEE Std 802.3 Clause 68). 1.4.40 10GBASE-LW: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 10 Gb/s using 10GBASE-W encoding and 10GBASE-L optics. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 50 and Clause 52.) 1.4.41 10GBASE-LX4: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 10 Gb/s using 10GBASE-X encoding over four WWDM lanes over multimode fiber. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 54.) 1.4.42 10GBASE-PR: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 10 Gb/s (10/10G-EPON) point-to- multipoint link over one single-mode optical fiber. NOTE—See IEEE Std 802.3 Clause 75, Clause 76, and Clause 77. 1.4.43 10/1GBASE-PRX: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 10 Gb/s downstream, 1 Gb/s upstream (10/1G-EPON) point-to-multipoint link over one single-mode optical fiber. NOTE—See IEEE Std 802.3 Clause 75, Clause 76, and Clause 77. 1.4.44 10GBASE-R: An IEEE 802.3 physical coding sublayer for serial 10 Gb/s operation. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 49.) 1.4.45 10GBASE-S: IEEE 802.3 PMD specifications for 10 Gb/s serial transmission using short wave- length. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 52.) 20 The numbers in brackets preceded by the letter B correspond to those of the bibliography in Annex A. 18 Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved.IEEE Std 802.3-2012 IEEE STANDARD FOR ETHERNET SECTION ONE 1.4.46 10GBASE-SR: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 10 Gb/s using 10GBASE-R encoding and 10GBASE-S optics. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 49 and Clause 52.) 1.4.47 10GBASE-SW: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 10 Gb/s using 10GBASE-W encoding and 10GBASE-S optics. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 50 and Clause 52.) 1.4.48 10GBASE-T: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for a 10 Gb/s LAN using four pairs of Class E or Class F balanced copper cabling. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 55.) 1.4.49 10GBASE-W: An IEEE 802.3 physical coding sublayer for serial 10 Gb/s operation that is data-rate and format compatible with SONET STS-192c. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 49.) 1.4.50 10GBASE-X: An IEEE 802.3 physical coding sublayer for 10 Gb/s operation over XAUI and four lane PMDs. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 48.) 1.4.51 100GBASE-R: An IEEE 802.3 family of Physical Layer devices using the physical coding sublayer defined in Clause 82 for 100 Gb/s operation. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 82.) 1.4.52 100GBASE-CR10: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 100 Gb/s using 100GBASE-R encoding over ten lanes of shielded balanced copper cabling, with reach up to at least 7 m. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 85.) 1.4.53 100GBASE-ER4: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 100 Gb/s using 100GBASE-R encoding over four WDM lanes on single-mode fiber, with reach up to at least 40 km. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 88.) 1.4.54 100GBASE-LR4: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 100 Gb/s using 100GBASE-R encoding over four WDM lanes on single-mode fiber, with reach up to at least 10 km. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 88.) 1.4.55 100GBASE-SR10: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 100 Gb/s using 100GBASE-R encoding over ten lanes of multimode fiber, with reach up to at least 100 m. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 86.) 1.4.56 1G-EPON: An EPON architecture operating at 1 Gb/s in both downstream and upstream directions. 1.4.57 10G-EPON: An EPON architecture operating at 10 Gb/s in either downstream or both downstream and upstream directions. This term collectively refers to 10/10G-EPON and 10/1G-EPON architectures. 1.4.58 10/1G-EPON: An EPON architecture operating at 10 Gb/s in downstream direction and at 1 Gb/s data rate in upstream direction (asymmetric rate). 1.4.59 10/10G-EPON: An EPON architecture operating at 10 Gb/s in both downstream and upstream direc- tions (symmetric rate). 1.4.60 40GBASE-R: An IEEE 802.3 family of Physical Layer devices using the physical coding sublayer defined in Clause 82 for 40 Gb/s operation. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 82.) 1.4.61 40GBASE-CR4: IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer specification for 40 Gb/s using 40GBASE-R encoding over four lanes of shielded balanced copper cabling, with reach up to at least 7 m. (See IEEE Std 802.3, Clause 85.) Copyright © 2012 IEEE. All rights reserved. 19

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