How to use Chemical safety

chemical safety in the workplace pdf free download
MarthaKelly Profile Pic
MarthaKelly,Mexico,Researcher
Published Date:12-07-2017
Your Website URL(Optional)
Comment
     Chemical Safety  Handbook  2008 Edition    Table of Contents  1. INTRODUCTION  7  2. DEFINITIONS  7  3. WORKPLACE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION SYSTEM  7  3.1  Labels ................................................................................................................................ 8  3.1.1  Supplier Labels .......................................................................................................... 8  3.1.2  Workplace Labels...................................................................................................... 8  3.2  Material Safety Data Sheets .............................................................................................. 8  3.3  Training ............................................................................................................................. 9  3.4  Understanding hazard warning information ...................................................................... 9  3.4.1  WHMIS Symbols ....................................................................................................... 9  3.4.2  Toxicological properties: LD  AND LC  ................................................................... 9  50 50 3.4.3  Exposure values (TWAEV, STEV, CEV)..................................................................... 11  3.4.4  Flash point .............................................................................................................. 11  3.4.5  Autoignition temperature ...................................................................................... 11  3.4.6  Flammable limits .................................................................................................... 11  4. GENERAL CHEMICAL SAFETY  12  4.1  Good Work Practices/General Safety .............................................................................. 12  4.2  Food storage and consumption ....................................................................................... 12  4.3  Smoking .......................................................................................................................... 13  4.4  Personal Hygiene ............................................................................................................ 13  5. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT  13  2 5.1  Eye and face protection ................................................................................................... 13  5.2  Hand protection .............................................................................................................. 14  5.2.1  Selection of Gloves for Work with Chemicals ........................................................ 14  5.2.2  Use and Care of Gloves ........................................................................................... 16  5.3  Body Protection – Protective clothing.............................................................................. 16  5.4  Respiratory Protection .................................................................................................... 17  6. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES  17  6.1  Equipment ...................................................................................................................... 18  6.2  Chemical Related Emergency Procedures ........................................................................ 18  6.2.1  Chemical Contact .................................................................................................... 18  6.2.2  Poisoning ................................................................................................................ 19  6.2.3  Power failure .......................................................................................................... 19  6.2.4  Domestic Water Interruption ................................................................................. 19  6.2.6  Chemical Spills ........................................................................................................ 20  7. CHEMICAL SPILL PREVENTION AND PREPAREDNESS  20  7.1  Training ........................................................................................................................... 20  7.2  Spill Kits .......................................................................................................................... 20  7.3  Spill Classification ............................................................................................................ 23  7.4  Spill Response ................................................................................................................. 24  8. SPECIFIC CHEMICAL HAZARDS  26  8.1  Flammables ..................................................................................................................... 26  8.2  Oxidizers ......................................................................................................................... 26  8.2.1  Solids ....................................................................................................................... 27  8.2.2  Liquids ..................................................................................................................... 27  8.2.3  Use of Oxidizers ...................................................................................................... 27  3 8.2.4  Peroxygen Compounds ........................................................................................... 27  8.3  Corrosives ....................................................................................................................... 29  8.3.1  Corrosive Liquids .................................................................................................... 29  8.3.2  Corrosive Solids ...................................................................................................... 29  8.3.3  Corrosive Gases ...................................................................................................... 29  8.3.4  Use and Handling of Corrosives .............................................................................. 30  8.4  Highly Reactive Materials ................................................................................................ 30  8.4.1  Water reactives ...................................................................................................... 30  8.4.2  Pyrophorics ............................................................................................................. 30  8.4.3  Organic Peroxides ................................................................................................... 31  8.4.4  Explosives ............................................................................................................... 31  8.5  Cryogenic Materials......................................................................................................... 31  8.6  Designated Substances .................................................................................................... 32  8.6.1  Mercury .................................................................................................................. 33  8.6.2  Isocyanates ............................................................................................................. 34  8.6.3  Benzene .................................................................................................................. 34  8.7  Other Toxic Materials ...................................................................................................... 34  9. COMPRESSED GASES  34  9.1  Hazards of Compressed Gases ......................................................................................... 34  9.2  Handling and Transport of Gas Cylinders ......................................................................... 35  9.3  Regulators ....................................................................................................................... 36  9.4  Leaks ............................................................................................................................... 36  9.5  Storage of Gas Cylinders .................................................................................................. 36  9.5.1 Segregation of Gas Cylinders ................................................................................... 37  10. CHEMICAL HANDLING AND STORAGE  38  10.1  EHS Chemical Inventory ................................................................................................. 38  4 10.2  General Transport Practices........................................................................................... 39  10.3  General Storage Practices .............................................................................................. 39  10.4  Storage of Flammables and Combustibles ..................................................................... 40  10.4.1 Storage Rooms for Flammable and Combustible Liquids ..................................... 40  10.4.2  Approved Flammable Storage Cabinets ............................................................... 41  10.5  Chemical Segregation .................................................................................................... 41  10.6  Storage of Gas Cylinders ................................................................................................ 44  10.7  Containment ................................................................................................................. 44  11. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT  44  11.1  Minimization of Hazardous Waste ................................................................................. 46  11.2 Packaging and Labelling Requirements ........................................................................... 46  11.3 Chemical Waste ............................................................................................................. 47  11.3.1 Unknown Waste .................................................................................................... 48  11.3.2  Explosive Waste .................................................................................................... 48            5 Index of Tables  Table 1 – Summary of WHMIS classes, their associated characteristics and proper handling and  storage procedures. .................................................................................................... 10  Table 2 – Flash points, lower explosive limits, autoignition temperatures and exposure limits of  several flammable and combustible materials. .......................................................... 12  Table 3 – Characteristics, Advantages, Disadvantages and Uses of Selective Chemical Resistant  Glove Materials. .......................................................................................................... 15  Table 4 – Minimum Requirements for Chemical Spill Kits ............................................................ 21  Table 5 – Examples of Neutralization Mixtures Available for Spill Response ............................... 22  Table 6 – Mercury Spill Kit Contents ............................................................................................. 22  Table 7 – Guidelines for the Classification of a Complex Spill ....................................................... 23  Table 8 – Response Procedures for Incidental Chemical Spills ..................................................... 25  Table 9 – Summary of Unacceptable Discharges to Sanitary Sewers ........................................... 45       Index of Figures  Figure A – Hazard and emergency contact sign ............................................................................ 17  Figure B – Schematic diagram of compressed gas cylinder and regulator ................................... 36  Figure C – Compressed gas segregation system ........................................................................... 37  Figure D – Chemical segregation system ....................................................................................... 42  Figure E – Sewage disposal of hazardous waste warning sign ...................................................... 44  Figure F – Hazardous waste disposal tag ....................................................................................... 47        6 1. Introduction     The health, safety and well‐being of the university community and the protection of the  environment are of utmost importance to the University. Through various functions, University  of Guelph personnel are responsible for the handling, use and storage of potentially hazardous  chemical products.   In order to address the health, safety and environmental challenges specific  to the usage of hazardous chemicals outside of laboratory environments, this handbook, and  the encompassing guidelines and procedures, have been developed.     This handbook is to provide supplemental information to the University of Guelph and  departmental health and safety policies as well as define minimum standards for safe practices  at the University.  Workers involved in laboratory work should refer to the Laboratory Safety  Manual for more detailed direction on chemical safety in the laboratory.    Our goal is a safe and healthy environment for faculty, staff, students and visitors.    2. Definitions    EHS – Environmental Health and Safety.  OHS – Occupational Health Services.   Supervisor – a person who has charge of a workplace or authority over a worker.  (Ontario  OH&S Act Section 1(1))    3. Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System     The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) is a legislated program that is  applicable to all University of Guelph employees and students who work in areas where  hazardous materials are used. The purpose of this legislation is to ensure that everyone in a  workplace is provided with the information needed to identify hazardous materials and to take  the appropriate precautions when working with these materials.  WHMIS accomplishes this  through the use of warning labels, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) and training on how to  use the information provided.  7 3.1  Labels  The label is the primary source of hazard information.  The requirements for label content are  dependent upon whether the container is from a supplier or a workplace, and whether the  hazardous material is a laboratory product, a sample for analysis or neither.       3.1.1  Supplier Labels  A supplier label is required for containers containing 100 mL or more of the material.  Supplier  labels must contain the following information in both English and French and be enclosed by a  distinctive border coloured to contrast with the background of the label:   • Product identifier or name   • Supplier identifier (supplier’s name)   • Reference to the MSDS    • Hazard symbol(s)    • Risk phrase(s) (description of the main hazards of the product)   • Precautionary measures   • First aid measures   Supplier labels for materials sold in a container with less than 100 mL do not require risk  phrases, precautionary measures or first aid measures to be included.    3.1.2  Workplace Labels  A workplace label must contain the following information:  • Product identifier or name  • Precautionary measures   • Reference to the MSDS    3.2  Material Safety Data Sheets  MSDSs (Material Safety Data Sheets) provide detailed information about physical, chemical and  toxicological properties and hazards, as well as recommended handling and emergency  procedures. MSDSs must be reviewed and/or revised by the supplier at least every three years.   Unexpired MSDSs are to be readily available for all controlled products on site.  Up‐to‐date,  electronic MSDSs are available via the EHS website.  Supervisors are to ensure that personnel  have access to MSDSs for all hazardous materials they may use or contact.   Personnel are  strongly encouraged to regularly review MSDSs for all hazardous materials being used.    8 3.3  Training  Training is required to provide detailed instruction on the site specific procedures necessary to  carry out work safely, as well as provide the basis for accurate interpretation of the hazard  information provided on labels and MSDSs.     3.4  Understanding hazard warning information    3.4.1  WHMIS Symbols   The classes of controlled chemical products and their corresponding symbols or pictograms, as  well as general characteristics and handling precautions are outlined in Table 1.     3.4.2  Toxicological properties: LD  AND LC    50 50 Exposure to hazardous materials can occur by:  • absorption;  • ingestion;  • inhalation; or    • injection.  LD  and LC  values are commonly used measurements for the toxicity of a substance.    50 50 LD  (Lethal Dose 50) is the amount of a substance that, when administered by a defined route  50 of entry (e.g. oral or dermal) over a specified period of time, is expected to cause the death of  50% of a population. The LD  is usually expressed as weight of test substance per kilogram of  50 body weight (mg/kg or g/kg).  LC  (Lethal Concentration 50) is the concentration of a substance in air or water (depending on  50 the test population) that, when administered by inhalation over a specified period of time, is  expected to cause the death in 50% of a population. The LC  is usually expressed as parts of test  50 substance per million parts of air/water (ppm) for gases and vapours, or as milligrams per litre  or cubic metre of air (mg/L or mg/m3) for dusts, mists and fumes.   Note that the lower the LD  or LC , the more toxic the material.  For example sodium chloride  50 50 (table salt) has an LD  (oral, rat) of 3000 mg/kg and sodium cyanide has an LD  (oral, rat) of 6.4  50 50 mg/kg.  9 Table 1 – Summary of WHMIS classes, their associated characteristics and proper handling and  storage procedures.   Class A ‐ Compressed Gas  Contents under high pressure. Cylinder  may explode or burst when heated,  dropped or damaged.    Class B ‐ Flammable and Combustible  May catch fire when exposed to heat,  Material  spark or flame. May burst into flames.    Class C ‐ Oxidizing Material  May cause fire or explosion when in  contact with wood, fuels or other  combustible material.     Class D, Division 1   Poisonous substance. A single exposure  Poisonous and Infectious Material:  may be fatal or cause serious or  Immediate and serious toxic effects   permanent damage to health.    Class D, Division 2 Poisonous and  Poisonous substance. May cause  Infectious Material:  irritation. Repeated exposure may cause  Other toxic effects   cancer, birth defects, or other permanent  damage.    Class D, Division 3 Poisonous and  May cause disease or serious illness.  Infectious Material: Biohazardous  Drastic exposures may result in death.  infectious materials     Class E ‐ Corrosive Material  Can cause burns to eyes, skin or  respiratory system.    Class F ‐ Dangerously Reactive Material  May react violently causing explosion, fire  or release of toxic gases, when exposed  to light, heat, vibration or extreme  temperatures    http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/legisl/whmis_classifi.htmL, November 2005  10 3.4.3  Exposure values (TWAEV, STEV, CEV)   An exposure limit is the concentration of a substance below which no adverse effects would be  expected.  Exposure values can be expressed as the following:  • TWAEV (8‐hour Time‐Weighted Average Exposure Value): average concentration to  which most workers can be exposed during an 8‐hour workday, day after day, without  adverse effects   • STEV (Short‐Term Exposure Value): maximum average concentration to which most  workers can be exposed over a 15 minute period, day after day, without adverse effects   • CEV (Ceiling Exposure Value): the concentration that must never be exceeded (applies to  many chemicals with acute toxic effects)     3.4.4  Flash point   Flash point is the lowest temperature at which a substance produces enough vapour to ignite in  the presence of an ignition source. The lower the flash point of a substance, the greater the fire  hazard.  Liquids such as acetone and gasoline have flash points that are below room  temperature.    3.4.5  Autoignition temperature   Autoignition temperature is the temperature at which a material will ignite, in the absence of an  ignition source.  The lower the autoignition temperature of a substance, the greater the fire  hazard.    3.4.6  Flammable limits   Flammable or explosive limits are the range of concentrations of a material in air that will burn  or explode in the presence of an ignition source.  Explosive limits are usually expressed as the  percent by volume of the material in air:   LEL (lower explosive limit) or LFL (lower flammable limit):  lowest vapour concentration that  will explode or burn if ignited.  Below this limit the concentration of fuel is too "lean" for  ignition, i.e., the mixture is oxygen rich but contains insufficient fuel.   UEL (upper explosive limit) or UFL (upper flammable limit):  highest vapour concentration that  will explode or ignite. Above this limit, the mixture is too "rich" for ignition.   The flammable range consists of concentrations between the LEL and the UEL.     11 Table 2 – Flash points, lower explosive limits, autoignition temperatures and exposure limits of  several flammable and combustible materials.   Flash Point  LEL  TWAEV    Autoignition  Solvent   temp (°C)    (°C)   (% by volume)   (ppm)   acetone   ‐18  2.5 465 250  diesel   54  0.7 254 100  gasoline  ‐45  1.4 Not available 300  toluene   4.4  1.1 422 100  Varsol  60  0.6 227 300  TWAEV – 8‐Hour Time Weighted AverageExposureValue   LEL – Lower Explosive Limit   NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards, NIOSH publication number 2005‐151 or if unavailable  corresponding MSDS    Corresponding MSDS    4. General Chemical Safety    4.1  Good Work Practices/General Safety  Know and understand the hazards, safe handling and operating procedures of the materials  being used.  Review MSDS’s and standard operating procedures as applicable.  • Ensure hazardous materials are labelled according to all applicable legislation (e.g.  WHMIS, the Pesticides Act, and/or the Explosives Act).  • Report missing labels to supervisors.  Never use substances of unknown identity.    • Never “sniff‐test” a chemical.    • Report accidents and near misses promptly to your supervisor.     4.2  Food storage and consumption  Storage and consumption of food and/or drink (including water) in areas where hazardous  substances are exposed is prohibited.      12 4.3  Smoking  As per Policy 851.03.07, smoking is strictly prohibited in all University buildings including in or  near all chemical or waste storage areas.  Tobacco products are not to be brought into the areas  where hazardous substances are exposed.    4.4  Personal Hygiene  To prevent unforeseen accidents or exposures, the following points are to be followed when  working with hazardous materials:  • Tie back or otherwise secure long hair.   • Avoid touching your face or hair while wearing gloves.  • Wash hands thoroughly after removal of gloves and/or after working with hazardous  materials.  • Wear closed‐toed, closed‐heeled shoes.    5. Personal Protective Equipment    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is to be used according to the hazards presented by the  specific material being used as determined by the supervisor.  Personal protective equipment is  not to be used in place of engineering controls but is to be used diligently to provide  supplemental protection.    The following sections provide minimum standards for personal protective equipment.    5.1  Eye and face protection  This section is to be used in conjunction with Policy 851.05.03.  Canadian Standards Association  (CSA) approved eye protection is to be worn by students, employees and visitors in all areas  where hazardous or unknown substances are being stored, used or handled, where there is a  risk of splash, projectiles or air borne particles and/or where there is harmful radiant energy.    • Minimum eye protection when working with hazardous materials consists of approved  safety glasses with permanent side shields.  Safety glasses are designed to protect  against impact and do not provide significant splash protection.   Therefore safety  glasses should only be worn in cases of light work not involving significant volumes of  liquids.   • Goggles are to be worn when there is a risk of splashing a hazardous material.  Indirect  vented goggles are preferred.    13 • Eye protection is to provide adequate impact and splash resistance appropriate for the  work being done.    • Ultraviolet (UV) protective eyewear is required where there is risk of exposure to UV  light.  • Face shields are to be used if an explosion or significant splash hazard exists such that  there is a need to provide further protection to the face.  • Face shields are to be used in conjunction with primary eye protection (safety glasses or  goggles depending on the hazard).    • Full size shields that can be placed directly in front of the hazard may also be used to  provide additional protection to the entire body.  These too, are only to be used in  conjunction with goggles, protective clothing, etc.   While wearing contact lenses is not prohibited when working with hazardous materials, an  assessment of the specific circumstance or environment is to be made to decide whether or not  wearing contact lenses presents a hazard to the worker and therefore if it should be prohibited.   Contact lenses themselves do not provide eye protection.  Further information regarding the  wearing of contact lenses in situations involving hazardous materials may be found at the  following websites.  Canadian Centre for Occupation Health and Safety – OSH Answers:  http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/prevention/contact_len.html    CDC‐NIOSH – Contact Lens Use in a Chemical Environment:  http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2005‐139/    5.2  Hand protection  5.2.1  Selection of Gloves for Work with Chemicals   No one glove material is appropriate for protection against all potential chemical hazards as the  permeation rate (rate at which the chemical seeps through the glove material) of the different  glove types varies significantly with the chemical in question.  Consultation of the MSDS along  with consideration of the usage will provide guidance in determining an appropriate glove.   Table 3 provides some basic information about selecting gloves suitable for various chemical  applications.  The following links provide more detailed information regarding the proper selection of glove  materials based on what specific chemical(s) are being handled.    • Ansell Chemical Resistance Guide:   http://www.ansellpro.com/download/Ansell_7thEditionChemicalResistanceGuide.pdf  • Best Manufacturing Company’s Chemrest:     http://www.chemrest.com/  14 • Oklahoma State University’s Chemical  Guide:  http://www.pp.okstate.edu/ehs/hazmat/gloves5.htm    Table 3 – Characteristics, Advantages, Disadvantages and Uses of Selective Chemical Resistant  Glove Materials.  TYPE  ADVANTAGES  DISADVANTAGES  FOR USE WITH:    Natural rubber  Low cost, good physical  Poor against oils, greases,  Bases, acids, alcohols, dilute  latex  properties, dexterity  organic solvents. May cause  aqueous solutions.  allergic reactions.  Fair vs. aldehydes, ketones.  Natural rubber  Low cost, dexterity,  Physical properties often  Bases, acids, alcohols, dilute  blends  generally better chemical  inferior to natural rubber.   aqueous solutions.  resistance than natural  May cause allergic reaction.  Fair vs. aldehydes, ketones.  rubber.  Polyvinyl  Low cost, very good  Plasticizers can be stripped.  Strong acids and bases, salts,  chloride (PVC)  physical properties,  aqueous solutions, alcohols,  average chemical  oils, greases and petroleum  resistance.  products.  Neoprene  Average cost, average  Poor vs. chlorinated  Oxidizing acids, alcohols,  chemical resistance,  hydrocarbons  anilines, phenol, glycol ethers,  average physical  solvents, oils, mild corrosives  properties, high tensile  strength, high heat  resistance.  Nitrile  Low cost, excellent  Poor vs. chlorinated organic  Oils, greases, aliphatic  physical properties,  solvents, many ketones  hydrocarbons, xylene,  dexterity  perchloroethylene,  trichloroethane.  Fair vs. toluene.  Butyl  Good resistance to polar  Expensive, poor vs.  Glycol ethers, ketones, esters,  organics, high resistance  hydrocarbons, chlorinated  aldehydes, polar organic  to gas and water vapour  solvents  solvents  Polyvinyl alcohol  Resists broad range of  Very expensive.  Water  Aliphatic and aromatic  (PVA)  organics, good physical  sensitive, poor vs. light  hydrocarbons, chlorinated  properties.  alcohols, acids and bases.  solvents, ketones (except  acetone), esters, ethers  Fluro‐elastomer  Good resistance to  Extremely expensive.  Poor  Aromatics and aliphatic  (Viton®)  organic and aromatic  physical properties.  Poor vs.  hydrocarbons, chlorinated  solvents. Flexible.  some ketones, esters, amines  solvents, oils, lubricants,  mineral acids, alcohols.  Norfoil, Silver  Excellent chemical  Poor fit, stiff, easily punctures,  Use for Hazmat work.  Good for  Shield™, 4H™  resistance.  poor grip.  range of solvents, acids and  bases.  Modified table taken from: http://www.ecu.edu/oehs/LabSafety/GloveMaterialsChart.htm, November 15, 2005  15 5.2.2  Use and Care of Gloves  The following guidelines should be considered when using gloves:  • Gloves should be inspected for damage prior to use.  Any sign of deterioration, such as  holes, tears or discoloration, should prompt immediate replacement of the gloves.    • Gloves should be of an appropriate fit and thickness to allow for the required tactile  sensitivity.  • Gloves should be an appropriate length so as to provide adequate protection of the  arm.  • Gloves should be removed by pulling the gloves inside out to prevent any exposure  during removal.  • Gloves are to be removed prior to touching computers or phones, opening doors or  otherwise contacting items that would be expected to be free of contamination.  • Wash hands thoroughly after removal of gloves.  • Never reuse disposable gloves.  • Reusable gloves should be stored and maintained in such a way as to prevent exposure  (e.g. in a Ziploc bag) and should be stored within the work area.  Manufacturer’s  instructions are to be followed as applicable.      5.3  Body Protection – Protective clothing  The use of protective clothing is to be carefully considered whenever hazardous chemicals are  being used or handled.  Selection of the protective clothing is to be based on an assessment of  the hazards being encountered giving careful consideration to both the volume and the toxicity  of materials.   Protective clothing could include lab coats, sleeve protectors, shirts, pants,  jackets, coveralls or full body suits.  The level of protection provided by various types of  protective clothing may range from protection against minor splashes or contamination of  street clothes (e.g. lab coat) to the provision of an effective physical barrier to the chemical in  question (e.g. Hazmat suit).  Protective clothing is to be stored outside of office areas or other locations where food and/or  drink is permitted.  Shorts are not suitable attire when working with hazardous chemicals.   Protective clothing is to be cleaned or replaced regularly and is to be laundered separately from  all other clothing.   Aprons should be worn as additional protection in situations where there is an elevated splash  hazard.  Synthetic rubber aprons should be worn when working with large volumes (i.e. greater  than four litres) of concentrated inorganic acids e.g. hydrochloric and sulphuric acids.  The use of  aprons alone is discouraged as they provide inadequate protection of the arms.  16 5.4  Respiratory Protection  See Policy 851.05.06.  The use of a respirator should only be considered when permanent  engineering controls are inadequate or non‐functional e.g. emergency spill situations.  Users  must be registered in the University of Guelph Respirator program and appropriately trained  and fitted prior to using a respirator.  Fit‐testing is required for all respirators and is provided by  EHS.  Contact the Occupational Hygiene Safety Officer at x54855 for more information.      6. Emergency Procedures    Each chemical storage room is to have a completed hazard and emergency contact sign (seen in  Figure A) posted on the outside of the storage room door.  Supervisors are responsible for  ensuring these signs are generated using an online application accessible at the following  location at http://www.uoguelph.ca/ehs/hazmat%20signage/index.html.    Figure A – Hazard and emergency contact sign      17 6.1  Equipment  Supervisors are responsible for ensuring that all individuals are familiar with the use and  locations of the following equipment in all areas in which they will be working:  • Fire extinguisher  • Eye wash station  • Safety shower  • Evacuation alarm  • Emergency routes and exits  • First aid kits  • Spill kits    6.2  Chemical Related Emergency Procedures  6.2.1  Chemical Contact  For skin contact:   • For a small, easily accessible area of the skin, e.g. the hand  o Proceed to the nearest sink.  o Remove contaminated clothing and jewellery.   o Rinse for at least 15 minutes.     • For a large or inaccessible area of skin  o Remove contaminated clothing and jewellery  o Go to the nearest emergency shower.   o Rinse for at least 15 minutes.  o Seek medical attention if required.   Provide applicable MSDS to medical personnel.  For contact with the eyes:  • Go to the nearest eyewash station.  • Rinse for at least 15 minutes.   • If wearing contact lenses, remove them as quickly as possible, while continuing to flush.   • Hold your eyelids open with your fingers.   • Roll your eyeballs, so that water can flow over the entire surface of the eye.   • Lift your eyelids frequently to ensure complete flushing.   • Cover the injured eye with dry sterile gauze pads.  • Seek medical attention.  Provide applicable MSDS to medical personnel.  OHS is to be contacted at x54283 for follow‐up after any chemical exposure.    18 6.2.2  Poisoning  Over‐exposure to toxic substances can occur through inhalation, absorption, ingestion or  injection. When assisting a victim of poisoning:  • Call for an ambulance (dial x2000) for serious poisoning.   • Ensure that the area is safe to enter before attempting to aid the victim.    • If safe to do so, move the victim away from the contaminated area and provide first aid  as required.   • Contact the Poison Control Centre at 1‐800‐268‐9017 for further instructions.    • Provide emergency medical personnel with the MSDS for the toxic substance.   • Always ensure that the victim receives medical attention, even if the exposure seems  minor.     OHS is to be contacted at x54283 for follow‐up after any work‐related chemical exposure.    6.2.3  Power failure  Any refrigerators or freezers containing flammable materials that require storage below room  temperature must:   • Be connected to the back‐up power supply.   Or  • Have an alternate refrigerator or freezer identified such that these materials can be  transferred for continued safe storage.  Emergency procedures for such refrigerators/freezers should be posted on the refrigerator or  freezer itself.  As well, in the event of a power failure, ventilation may be lost or reduced.      6.2.4  Domestic Water Interruption  In the event of a domestic water interruption:  • Notify Physical Resources x53854.    • Stop all work with or near hazardous materials until water is restored.  Loss of water  translates to inoperable emergency showers, eyewash stations and sinks.     19 6.2.6  Chemical Spills  It is important that you only respond to spills if you are trained in proper spill response, are  comfortable and confident in the proper procedures for cleaning up the spill, can clean‐up the  spill safely and the spill is considered “incidental”.    See section 7 for detailed information on training, spill kits, spill classification, response and  reporting requirements.    7. Chemical Spill Prevention and Preparedness    Prevention of chemical spills is the most important step to chemical spill response.  However  personnel should be aware of spill clean‐up procedures and be prepared to respond should a  spill occur.    7.1  Training  It is the responsibility of the supervisor to ensure that sufficient personnel are trained in  chemical spill response specific to the chemicals contained within their work area.  Training  should be documented and refreshed on at least an annual basis.    7.2  Spill Kits  Each work area using hazardous chemical materials must have easy access to a chemical spill kit  that is prominently located, readily visible and identifiable.    Exact contents of a spill kit should  be based on the hazardous properties of the materials present.  Table 4 lists the recommended  minimal requirements for spill kits.  20 

Advise: Why You Wasting Money in Costly SEO Tools, Use World's Best Free SEO Tool Ubersuggest.