Walking To Rome

Walking To Rome | download pdf free
IshaJohnson Profile Pic
IshaJohnson,United Kingdom,Professional
Published Date:31-07-2017
Your Website URL(Optional)
Comment
        Walking  To   Rome      Vincent J. Purcell       Table of Contents  Introduction .................................................................................... 9  Chapter 1  Beginnings ................................................................................... 13  Chapter 2  Growing Up .................................................................................. 29  Chapter 3  Working Life and Friends ............................................................ 35  Chapter 4  Home and Marriage ..................................................................... 53  Chapter 5  Love and Loneliness .................................................................... 65  Chapter 6  The Demon Drink ........................................................................ 69  Chapter 7  Life of Crime ................................................................................ 79  Chapter 8  Separation ..................................................................................... 85  Chapter 9  Revelation .................................................................................... 89  Chapter 10  Vision and Provision .................................................................... 97  Chapter 11  The Wrong Way ......................................................................... 103  Chapter 12  The Way Home .......................................................................... 111  Chapter 13  New Christian Friends ............................................................... 121  Chapter 14  New Beginnings for Family and Friends ................................... 129  Chapter 15  The Lord Answers Prayer .......................................................... 141  Chapter 16  A Pastor Promoted ..................................................................... 157  Chapter 17  Divine Intervention .................................................................... 173  Chapter 18  Working with the Homeless ....................................................... 183  Chapter 19  The Shop .................................................................................... 195  Chapter 20  Family Re-union ........................................................................ 201  Chapter 21  The Black Hole .......................................................................... 211  Chapter 22  Different Types of Work ............................................................ 225  Chapter 23  Mammy ...................................................................................... 239  Chapter 24  In Conclusion ............................................................................. 253  Author Biography ...................................................................... 261      Introduction    Jack  Devonshire  a  national  sales  representative  was  driving home one evening after a pretty mundane sort of a  day. As he drove over the crest of a hill approaching his home  town he saw a most beautiful sunset in all its glory. Spying a  lay‐by on the off side of the road he indicated and pulled in.   With his eyes fixed on the glorious setting sun he got out of  his car and resting his arms over the roof nestled his chin on  his hands; his eyes were opened as wide as wide could be,  and he felt a sense of euphoria. Yes, he had seen sunsets in the  past, but never one to compare with this, it was magnificent  He was going to savour every minute because he knew that in  a short time the wonderful scene would be gone for ever.    Carol Knight, a mother of three, was going upstairs to  put some toiletries in the bathroom as the notion crossed her  mind  to  close  the  bedroom  curtains.  She  was  thinking  a  thousand thoughts as she wandered into the bedroom when  suddenly a rapturous feeling filled her soul. She was gazing  through the window at this most beautiful sunset, the same  one Jack had stopped to take pleasure in, and was fixed to the  spot  wondering  if  she  should  tell  her  family  who  were  downstairs, but then again she might lose the moment for  ever, anyway they might not appreciate it. This was like all  the sunsets she had ever seen rolled into one and she could  have so easily missed it. What an amazing sight she thought, I  will take my fill of this wondrous moment.   Brian Reed, a local farmer, was looking at the exact  same sunset from his tractor. He had seen many a sunset in  his life time but, never one like this; it had taken his breath  away,  surpassing  anything  he  had  ever  seen  before.  He  remembered a recent Bible reading from the book of psalms  9 ‘the heavens declare the glory of the Lord’. Yes, he could see  that  What a great deal of pleasure he was getting from this  moment.   Within the space of a minute the glorious sight was  gone forever, but Brian, Jack and Carol would never forget the  remarkable sight, what a pleasurable event it had been for  them.   If  you  had  asked  any  of  them  to  describe  their  experience they would not describe it in exactly the same  way, we might ask ‘why not?’  The answer is ‐ there are a hundred and one differing  variables which make them unique in their own right.  For  example:  where  they  were  geographically  at  that  given  moment in time; in the bedroom, on the road side and in a  field.   All the compilation of memories that made up their  own  individual  experiences  would  affect  how  they  would  describe what they saw, yet they were all looking at the same  sunset ‐ or were they. Think about it, go ahead philosophize  about it.   I mention the above at the outset of my story, because  this story is unique to me.  The events explained in it are the  way I saw them, from a perspective which I believe is honest  and true. Some of the names of people and places have been  changed for the sake of anonymity, but the events remain the  same.   I saw such a ‘spiritual’ glorious sunset, and more, it did  not fade away with the night, but became more glorious, this  is what I want to share with you, the reader.  The book you are about to read is a true story.  It’s  about one man’s search for reality.  It tells of a life changing  10 experience from a time when I was determined to commit  suicide to this present time.  You are about to go on a journey, travelling through  the valley of the shadow of death, over hills and dales, until  we reach the glorious mountain summit where my life was  changed forever.    An acquaintance asked me once if I missed the things  of my past life, my spontaneous answer was as follows:    My past was like living in the sewer with the stench,  darkness and fear of attack from rats at anytime, my life was  totally messed up.    Then one day I was brought out into the light, with  fresh air, blue skies and beautiful green fields full of scented  flowers and mountain landscapes.    No, I would not want to return to the sewer.  I think I  painted the picture for him.  You might ask the question, why do people have to  sink so deep before they reach out and ask God for help?    My answer is first, when we are so down, the only way  is for us to look up, for this is where our help comes from.    Secondly, some people need to be desperate enough  before they will reach out their hand and cry for help. There is  nothing wrong with humbling our selves and reaching out.      11  Chapter 1  Beginnings    Born in Southern Ireland, into a strong Irish Catholic  Family I am the oldest boy in a family of fifteen.  The family  was made up of Daddy and Mammy, 5 older sisters and 2  younger along with 4 younger brothers, an older brother, the  firstborn had died when just a baby.     I had just reached the age of five when my family  travelled to England and Blackburn.  I have vague memories  of going onto what seemed like a massive ferry, we must have  hired a cabin because I remember one of my sisters falling out  of the top bunk.    The strangest thing, on arriving in England, was seeing  the houses with smoke blackened stonework; some of the  doors on the houses seemed so black that, to me, they looked  as if they had been scorched in a fire.    We  lived  at  number  53  Primrose  Terrace,  Mill  Hill  when we first came to Blackburn.  A black fire range was the  centre piece of our kitchen where the family spent most of the  time when in doors.  It was furnished with two arm chairs  and a dining table surrounded by four stand chairs which  hugged the partitioned wall that closed off the stair case.  Thoughts of this room brings back memories of my  brothers and sisters huddled on the floor around Daddy’s feet  as he told his all consuming stories painting pictures with  every sentence.  There was a knock on the door.  In came Graham, who  lived up the road, a tall lanky man with two rather large front  teeth, coming in to accompany Daddy’s accordion playing  with his spoons and bones.    13 Beautiful  music  filling  the  air,  a  warm  cosy  fire,  happy  smiling faces, hot toast made on the open fire and smothered  in real butter, what marvellous times we had.    There was always such a thrill of excitement at the  approach to Christmas; it sent a quiver through my whole  being.  The small Christmas tree sitting in the middle of the  Parlour window its coloured lights flashing on and off. Carol  singing with my two sisters, receiving pennies half pennies  and farthings, and very rarely a thrupenny bit.    Going house to house, not feeling the cold, beautiful  trees in almost every home full of different coloured sparkling  lights.  Away in a Manger, Little Donkey or The Holly and the  Ivy what shall we sing next?     Our carol singing money kept in a glove. What a grand  childhood we had.    Daddy used to play an accordion in a Ceilidh Band  when  we  lived  in  Ireland,  I  remember  him  playing  the  sweetest music that I had ever heard. He also made his own  tin  whistles  which  when  played  made  a  pleasant  and  yet  haunting sound.   I never knew that bones and spoons could  be played as musical instruments, but I must admit when I  heard them, accompanied by the accordion, they harmonised  very well.  Our  home  life  was  full  of  story  telling  and  music.   Daddy  was  a  very  good  story  teller,  and  I  particularly  remember one of the many stories he told.   Although it is an Irish folk legend it highlights the fact  that Daddy wished to impress upon us, his children, the need  to care for one another.  He used his story telling skills to do  this and my life was impacted by these stories.  Some were  scary and frightening but he had grown up with them and felt  14 it right to pass them onto his children.  Others like the one  below gave an insight into right from wrong.  The story was about a family of seven. The father had  died and the oldest son, called Brian, was 14 years of age.  They were very poor and had little to eat, so Brian said that he   out and find work in order to earn some money to  would go buy food.  Early the next day he set off, not taking any provision  for his journey. He walked all that day asking at shops, cattle,  dairy, and sheep farms, businesses, anywhere where he might  obtain work, but he received the same reply time and time  again.    Times  were  hard  and  people  had  very  little  for  themselves without employing someone.   Late into the evening, when the day was well spent,  Brian was very tired.  As he was heading home he passed an  old mansion set in its own grounds, saw a sign on the large  black cast iron gates which read, ‘Man needed apply within’.  The lad’s eyes lit up giving him hope in his heart, he pushed  through the large heavy gates, which took what little energy  he had,   Looking up through the trees lining the meandering  drive leading up to the house, he could see only one dim light  scarcely prevailing over the darkness that shrouded it.    The  huge  heavy  door  seemed  as  if  it  had  received  many  coats  of  black  paint  over  the  years;  and  appeared  uninviting, seeming to guard many secrets.   A grim looking man in his late fifties responded to his  knock, looked up and down at the lad without saying a word.   A little unnerved Brian said ‘Sir, I have responded to  the notice on the gate’.   ‘Son, you are very young, you are just a lad’ was the  reply.   15 The man stood with a serious look on his face studying Brian  long and hard, and then said ‘come in and follow me’.    He led the way through the open hallway, up the wide  staircase through a corridor with rooms off to the right and  left. Finally he reached out turned the door handle to a large  bedroom and directed Brian inside.  ‘I want you to stay here all night, and in the morning  tell me what has happened.   The last two men I asked to do  this ran out of the room and left, never to be seen again’.   ‘Sir I can do it.  I have a mother, four sisters and a brother and  they are going hungry, please give me a chance’.    ‘If you stay until the morning I will pay you well’ he  was told.  Lighting a candle he placed it in the room then  walked back down the corridor.   The lad watched him until the light from his lamp had  gone out of sight.  Turning round he looked into the room  then closed the door not knowing what was about to take  place.   The next hour passed slowly, he had a million thoughts  racing  through  his  head,  until  exhausted  from  the  day’s  events he drifted into a deep sleep.   At the stroke of midnight he was awakened by a loud  noise, the room shook. In one corner a pile of bones came  crashing through the ceiling the lad’s head turned and he saw  them land on the floor.   Then another pile of bones came through and landed in  another corner of the room. He turned his head again as a  third  pile  of  bones  come  crashing  through  and  landed  in  another corner.   He  was  petrified  but  the  thought  of  his  starving  mother, four sisters and brother kept him going.  He heard a  noise and his head turned yet again to see the first pile of  16 bones come together as a skeleton. Likewise the second and  the third did the same.    He heard another loud noise this time from the middle  of the ceiling as a football came through and landed in the  middle of the floor. Everything went quiet for a time, then  without warning the football rolled across the room to the  first skeleton.  Suddenly the three skeletons started kicking it  around the room, so Brian joined in.   They kicked the ball frantically for what seemed about  half an hour when abruptly it ran to the middle of the room,  stopped dead, then with a loud noise went up through the  ceiling back the way it had come.   The first skeleton walked toward Brian and said ‘you were  not frightened, you stayed?’   The lad replied, ‘I was very scared at first, but when we  play football I realised no harm was going to come to me’.    The first skeleton pointed to the second skeleton ‘this is  my son’, and then pointing to the other skeleton ‘this is his  son, and the man that let you into the house tonight is his son’  He went on to explain that in the past, for numerous  years, he and his family had wronged many people and could  not be at peace until the matter was settled.   He pointed to a wood panel at the side of the room and  walked  toward  it  beckoning  Brian  to  follow.  Indicating  a  wooden sculptured moulding in the middle of the panel, he  said  ‘turn  this  clockwise’.  It  was  stiff  but  it  turned  and  suddenly with a jolt the panel came loose. Brian pulled it out  and set it to one side against the wall. Inside he could see a  medium sized chest coved in dust.   ‘Pull it out’.   Unquestioningly Brian caught hold of the handle on  the side of chest and dragged it out onto the floor where it  17 landed with a crash, dust flying everywhere. He waved his  hand in front of his face wafting the dust away, and coughing  in order to clear his throat.  ‘Open it’ the skeleton ordered.   Obediently Brian pulled open the latch lifted the lid  and let it swing open revealing gold and silver coins. The dust  rose once again and Brian wafted it away and with an amazed  look on his face stared into the chest, seeing some ruby and  emerald stones lying there gleaming, partially hidden by the  coins.   ‘Look in the lid and you will find several sheets of  paper with names and addresses written on them.  These are  the names of all the people my family has wronged over  many years’.   Brian took the sheets of paper, which were turning  brown with age, and saw the names and addresses written  there.   ‘I want you to tell the master of the house everything  which has taken place tonight. Tell him that all the people on  the list or their descendents must be paid the amount stated’.  Brian  looked  up  at  him  solemnly  ‘yes  sir,  I  will  tell  him  everything’   The three skeletons returned to the corners from where  they came, their bones fell to the floor and with a loud noise  went through the ceiling one by one just as they had first  come down and everything became calm and still, not a single  sound.   The lad lent against the wall, slid to the floor thinking  of what had taken place, then he fell asleep, exhausted.  In his dreams Brian heard a voice it seemed to be coming  from the end of a long corridor. ‘Young man, young man,  18 wake up, wake up’. Coming out of his deep sleep he realized  he was a little disoriented.   The master of the house was standing with the door  open looking down at him, ‘you’re still here?’    He seemed to be quite surprised as he turned his head  d the  to see the chest on the floor at the side of the room an panel of wood which had been removed from the wall.   Quite overcome he said ‘my, my, what has happened  here?’  The lad was so excited and tried to tell him everything  at once.  Quickly he put up his hand and beckoned him to  stop. ‘Please wait, you must be hungry and exhausted, do not  say another word, follow me’.   Brian followed the man along the corridor and down  the staircase. Bringing him into a large drawing room, he  pointed  to  a  leather  arm  chair.  ‘Sit  here  son  and  make  yourself comfortable’.   Brian felt so privileged and was bursting to tell the  gentlemen everything.   ‘Forgive  me  my  manners,  I’m  as  eager  to  hear  everything you have to tell me just as much as you want to  share it’.  I have been waiting to hear what you have to tell me  for many years’, but first you must eat’.   He pulled a cord by the door and a servant came.  ‘You rang sir?’   ‘Yes Matthews, as quickly as you can go to the kitchen  and tell cook to prepare a hearty breakfast for this young lad’.   ‘Just one, breakfast Sir?’    ‘Yes, yes’, ‘I’m too excited to eat’    Matthews  face  lit  up,  he  could  sense  something  exciting was about to happen, there was a skip in his step as  he scurried off to the kitchen.   19 The gentleman turned to Brian and looking at his face  observed he could not contain himself from sharing all he had  seen and heard the previous night.    Getting an armchair he pulled it towards where Brian  was sitting, and when he got close enough put his hands on  the chair arms and sat down, eagerly staring at the lad.   ‘Alright son, speak slowly, start at the beginning, tell  me everything, do not hold anything back.’  Down  in  the  kitchen  there  was  excitement  and  anticipation;  something  had  happened  that  had  caused  immense joy for the master and the young lad had something  to do with it. The cook got busy making a sizeable breakfast  while questioning Matthews, ‘what did the master say?’   ‘Well, it isn’t what he said it’s how he looked’ was the  reply.     ‘What do you mean, how he looked?’   Well, I asked the master if he wanted breakfast too, and  he said I’m too excited to eat’. You know how he has had  sadness on his face for many years’.    ‘Yes’ said the cook ‘I know it all too well’.   ‘I’m telling you his face had a look of anticipation, like  the lad was going to tell him some good, and I mean really  good’.  Meanwhile in the drawing room Brian was in full flow  describing every scene as it had happened. The master of the  house was astounded, with his eyes wide and mouth open he  listened to every word.   Matthews came with the lad’s breakfast. The look on  their faces conveyed the same message; they could not be  interrupted.    ‘Put the tray on the sideboard, and pull the door closed  on your way out’.   20 The expression on Matthews face changed from one of  cheerfulness to mysterious curiosity, but moving quickly he  did as the master had ordered him shutting the door as he  left.  It  wasn’t  long  before  Brian  had  finished  telling  everything he’d seen and heard.   The gentleman, who he was to come to know as Mr.  Thorncroft, sat back in his chair with a short gasp ‘my, my’   Then as an after thought he looked at the breakfast on the  sideboard, then at the lad, jumping to his feet he quickly set a  coffee table in front of him, brought the breakfast tray and set  that in front of him too,  ‘Please eat, you must be rather hungry’.    Brian looking wide eyed at the delicious meal nodded  his head.   ‘Thank you Sir’, and tucked into the scrumptious meal.   Mr  Thorncroft  sank  back  into  his  chair  deep  in  thought.   When he had made up his mind about what he had to do and  how he would do it, his thoughts turned back to the lad.   As  he  watched  him  finishing  off  his  breakfast  he  thought, this young man has done more for me than other  grown men have ever accomplished. In doing this he has  demonstrated his love for his mother, sisters and brother in a  way I have never seen before.  As for me I have behaved  selfishly, thinking only about resolving my own problems, I  have heard things this day which have affected me down to  my inner core. He then resolutely decided in his heart, that  whatever else he did in his life, this young man and his family  would want for nothing ever again.   ‘Young man’, and as an after thought he said it again,  ‘young man, yes you are no longer a boy because last night  21 you did a man’s job.   I want to thank you from the bottom of  my heart’.   ‘Why thank you sir’.   The master went on, ‘You must please forgive me; I’ve  never asked your name’.  ‘My name Sir?’   ‘Yes, what is your name?’   ‘My name is Brian’.   ‘Well I’m pleased to make your acquaintance Brian, my  name is Mr Thorncroft, and I have a proposition for you’.   ‘A proposition, Sir?’    ‘Mr Thorncroft, please call me Mr Thorncroft because if  you agree to my proposal we will be working together’.   Brain looked enquiringly at him ‘working together Sir,  sorry Mr Thorncroft’.   ‘Yes, as you know I have a great deal of work ahead of  me repaying all the outstanding debts and I want you to help  me accomplish the task, will you assist me Brian?’   ‘Yes Sir Mr. Thorncroft’ with a beaming smile on his  face  Brian  knew  that  this  was  the  beginning  of  a  great  friendship.   ‘First things first Brian, I want you to take food and  money home to your family’.   Matthews was called again and given orders to get  provisions from the cook and have a carriage readied to take  Brian home, which he did.  After sharing with his family the  wonderful news of all that had happened since leaving home  and telling of future plans, Brian returned bright and early the  next day.   For the next two months Mr. Thorncroft, and Brian,  travelled  the  land,  near  and  far,  talking  to  families  and  22 individuals who had dealt with the Thorncroft family over the  years.    At first some of the people were shocked and some  were angry hearing how they had been cheated, but when an  offer  of  reimbursement  was  mentioned  they  became  very  grateful.   Most families were the beneficiaries of a small fortune.   It was so gratifying to see the looks on their faces, without  exception  they  were  appreciative  and  more  importantly,  forgiving.   When all the debts had been paid and the work was  completed Brian and Mr. Thorncroft returned to the mansion,  ordered tea and cakes and talked about what was to happen  next.  Over  the  past  months  they  had  spent  a  lot  of  time  together, and whilst working had laughed and talked, sharing  their life stories.   ‘You know what you have to do tonight Brian’.   ‘Yes Mr Thorncroft, I’m really looking forward to it, I  believe it will be an agreeable meeting this time’.   That night Brian had to return to the room upstairs  where he had encountered Mr Thorncroft’s forefathers.   At half past eleven as Mr Thorncroft looked on Brian  made his way up the large staircase carrying a lantern. There  was an air of accomplishment and anticipation, and as he  walked  down  the  long  corridor  there  were  hundreds  of  thoughts running through his head.   He reached for the door handle and walked inside the  room  closing  the  door  behind  him.  Looking  to  where  the  wooden  panel  had  been  moved  he  saw  that  it  had  been  replaced.   It seemed like ages since his first visit, just being back  in that room brought back memories of the previous events.   23 How  terrified  he  had  been  and  how  the  skeleton  had  complimented him for not running out of the room.   He smiled to himself thinking I was too scared to run if  the truth be known.   At the stroke of midnight the same loud noise which  he’d heard that first night shook the room once again. Yes  there was that element of fear but not as intense as before.   The  first  pile  of  bones  came  crashing  through  the  ceiling, this time Brian knew which corner of the room to look  at first.  Just as before the three piles of bones came into the  room one by one and then came together as skeletons.   As Brian was about to speak the loud noise came once  again as the football came crashing through, landing in the  middle of the floor, it stayed there for a moment then rolled  over to the first skeleton. Then just as they had done on their  first encounter, they frantically kicked it to each other.    Half  an  hour  later  without  warning,  as  before,  the  football  ran  back  to  the  middle  of  the  room,  and  went  crashing through the ceiling.   This time Brian waited for the oldest skeleton to speak  and not before very long he did.    ‘Well done young man, you did everything we asked  of you. After tonight we will never be seen again because we  can now go to our final resting place’.   In  turn  each  of  the  three  skeletons  thanked  Brian,  returned to their corners, fell to the ground then one by one  the piles of bones went back through the ceiling never to  return.   He felt a real sense of accomplishment as he picked up  the lantern left the room heading down the corridor to where  Mr Thorncroft was sitting on the top step of the staircase  waiting anxiously.   24 Seeing Brian he jumped to his feet put his arm around  his shoulder and looked into his eyes. The look that passed  between them told the story, all was well. When they reached  the  comfort  of  the  drawing  room  Brian  calmly  told  him  everything.   Mr Thorncroft had Matthews bring a hot milk drink for  Brian, he drank it, and then they both retired for the night.   In the morning everything seemed fresh as if a new life  had started for them both. Mr Thorncroft had a serious talk  with Brian.   ‘I  am  the  last  surviving  member  of  the  Thorncroft  family,  and  have  no  one  to  pass  my  estate  on  to,  I  have  thought about this long and hard, I want you to inherit all that  I have’.   Brian couldn’t believe what he was hearing, he didn’t  say a word.   ‘Over these past months I have, well, began to love you  like a son, and if you are willing I will teach you to manage  my whole estate and all my business affairs’.   After a brief moment of silence ‘well what do you say?   Oh I forgot to mention, you will move into this big old house  too’.   Brian’s  face  changed  from  a  big  smile  to  thoughtfulness.   As if he knew what Brian was thinking Mr. Thorncroft  said ‘your mother, sisters and brother will come and live here  also, there is plenty of room for us all’. A reassuring look and  big smile came over his face, he nodded his head as if to say  come on Brian say yes   Joy  filled  Brian’s  whole  being,  looking  at  Mr.  Thorncroft he smiled, and cried out ‘oh thank you, I would  love to come and spend the rest of my life with you’ and  25

Advise: Why You Wasting Money in Costly SEO Tools, Use World's Best Free SEO Tool Ubersuggest.