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Dr.MohitBansal,Canada,Teacher
Published Date:26-10-2017
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Creating Organic Materials In this chapter, we will cover the following topics: f Creating an organic-looking shader with procedurals f Creating a wasp-like chitin material with procedural textures f Creating a beetle-like chitin material with procedural textures f Creating tree shaders – the bark f Creating tree shaders – the leaves f Creating a layered human skin material in Cycles f Creating fur and hair f Creating a gray alien skin with procedurals Introduction Following on from the natural materials we have seen in Chapter 3, Creating Natural Materials in Cycles, and in Chapter 5, Creating Complex Natural Materials in Cycles, it's now time to take a look at organic shaders. Once again, while building the materials, we tried to use only the Cycles procedural textures. In several cases, this hasn't been the case by the way: on one side, because it hasn't been possible, and on the other side, because image maps usually work better than procedurals. In any case, procedurals have often been added to the shader to refine the details or to add a natural-looking randomness to a pattern that repeats too much.Creating Organic Materials Creating an organic-looking shader with procedurals In this recipe, we will create a sort of organic, disgusting-looking material, as shown in the following screenshot: The disgusting organic material as it appears in the final rendering Getting ready Start Blender and open the9931OS_08_start.blend file, where there is an already set scene with an unwrapped Suzanne primitive object leaning on a Plane, an Emitter mesh-light, and a Camera. Go to the Render window, and in the Sampling subpanel, change Pattern from Sobol to Correlated Multi-Jitter. How to do it... Let's go straight to the material creation by using the following steps: 1. Click on the New button in the Node Editor window toolbar or in the Material window under the main Properties panel and rename the new materialOrganic. 2. In the Material window, switch the Diffuse BSDF shader with a Mix Shader node, and label it asMix Shader2. In the r fi st Shader input socket, select a Mix Shader node and label it asMix Shader1, and in the second one, select an Add Shader node. 3. Go to the Mix Shader1 node, and in the first Shader input socket, load a Diffuse BSDF node, and in the second one, load a Glossy BSDF node. Change the Glossy BSDF shader node's Distribution to Ashikhmin-Shirley, and set the Roughness value to0.100. 298Chapter 8 4. Add a Subsurface Scattering node (press Shift + A and navigate to Shader Subsurface Scattering). Set the Falloff value to Gaussian, the Scale value to0.060, and the Radius values to4.000,2.000, and1.000 (top to bottom). 5. Connect the Mix Shader1 output to the first Shader input socket of the Add Shader node, and the output of the Subsurface Scattering node to the second Shader input socket of the Add Shader node. 6. Add a Layer Weight node (press Shift + A and navigate to Input Layer Weight) and connect its Facing output to the Fac input socket of the Mix Shader2 node. Set the Blend value to0.100. 7. Add a Fresnel node (press Shift + A and navigate to Input Fresnel) and connect its output to the Fac input socket of the Mix Shader1 node. Set the IOR value to5.950 as shown in the following screenshot: The basic shader nodes 8. Add a Texture Coordinate node (press Shift + A and navigate to Input Texture Coordinate), a Mapping node (press Shift + A and navigate to Vector Mapping), and a Voronoi Texture node (press Shift + A and navigate to Texture Voronoi Texture). Connect the Object output of the Texture Coordinate node to the Vector input socket of the Mapping node, and the output of this to the Vector input of the Voronoi Texture node. Set the Scale value of the Mapping node to1.500 for the three axes. 9. Add three ColorRamp nodes (press Shift + A and navigate to Converter ColorRamp) and label them asColorRamp1,ColorRamp2, andColorRamp3. Connect the Color output of the Voronoi Texture node to the Fac input sockets of the three ColorRamp nodes. 299Creating Organic Materials 10. In the ColorRamp1 node, set Interpolation to B-Spline, the black color stop to the 0.400 position, and the white color stop to the0.700 position. In the ColorRamp2 node, set Interpolation to B-Spline as well. Leave the black color stop at the0.000 position, and move the white color stop to the0.300 position. In the ColorRamp3 node, set Interpolation to Cardinal, leave the black color stop at the0.000 position, and move the white color stop to the0.805 position. 11. Add a MixRGB node (press Shift + A and navigate to Color MixRGB), set Blend Type to Add and the Fac value to1.000, and then connect the Color output of the ColorRamp1 node to the Color1 input socket, and the Color output of the ColorRamp2 node to the Color2 input socket. 12. Press Shift + D to duplicate the Add node and change Blend Type of the duplicate to Multiply. Connect the output of the Add node to the Color1 input socket, and the Color output of the ColorRamp3 node to the Color2 input socket. 13. Add a Bump node (press Shift + A and navigate to Vector Bump) and connect the output of the Multiply node to the Height input socket of the Bump node. Connect the Normal output of this to the Normal input sockets of the Diffuse BSDF, Glossy BSDF, and Subsurface Scattering nodes. Enable the Invert option on the Bump node, as shown in the following screenshot: The Bump node 14. Now, box-select (press the B key) the Texture Coordinate node and the Mapping nodes, and move them to the left to make room for new nodes. 15. Add a MixRGB node (press Shift + A and navigate to Color MixRGB) and label it asVector_deform. Paste it between the Mapping and Voronoi Texture nodes. 300Chapter 8 16. Add a Noise Texture node (press Shift + A and navigate to Texture Noise Texture), connect to its Vector input socket the Mapping node output, and set the Scale value to7.200. Connect the Noise Texture node's Color output to the Color2 input socket of the Vector_deform node. Set the Fac value of the Vector_deform node to0.080, as shown in the following screenshot: Deforming the mapping coordinates of the bump textures through a procedural noise 17. Add an RGB node (press Shift + A and navigate to Input RGB) and a new MixRGB node (press Shift + A and navigate to Color MixRGB). Label the MixRGB node 18. asColor_Diffuse. 19. Press Shift + D to duplicate the Color_Diffuse node and label the duplicate as Color_Glossy. 20. Connect the Color_Diffuse node's output to the Color input socket of the Diffuse BSDF shader node, and the Color_Glossy node's output to the Color input socket of the Glossy BSDF shader node. 21. Connect the output of the RGB node to the Color1 input sockets of both the Color_Diffuse and Color_Glossy nodes. Connect the RGB node also to the Color input socket of the Subsurface Scattering node. 22. Press Shift + D to duplicate the Color_Diffuse node, set Blend Type of the duplicate to Multiply, and label it asMultiply_Diffuse; then, paste it between the Color_Diffuse and Diffuse BSDF shader nodes. 23. Connect the Color output of the ColorRamp2 node to the Color2 input socket of the Multiply_Diffuse node. Set the Fac value of this to0.770. 301Creating Organic Materials 24. Go to the Color_Diffuse node and set the Fac value to0.830, and change the Color2 value of R to0.315, G to0.500, and B to0.130. 25. Go to the Color_Glossy node and set the Fac value to0.770, and change the Color2 values of R to0.860, G to0.611, and B to0.203. 26. Go to the RGB node and set the Color values for R to0.900, G to0.123, and B to 0.395, as shown in the following screenshot: Adding the color nodes 27. Save the file as 9931OS_organic.blend. How it works... f From step 1 to 7, we built a shader that is very similar to the shaders that we have already seen forSSS_materials. f From step 8 to 13, we built the bump pattern by using a single Voronoi Texture node tuned through three ColorRamp nodes with different settings. f From step 14 to 16, we added, through the very low value of a MixRGB node, the values of a Noise Texture node to the vector of the Voronoi Texture node to obtain a less regular pattern. f From step 17 to 25, we built the color pattern by establishing a base color by the RGB node and introducing a variation through the MixRGB nodes connected to the Color input sockets of the shader components. Note that the base pink color set in the RGB node goes straight to the SSS node. The MixRGB varied greenish color is multiplied by one of the bump outputs and then goes to the diffuse component of the shader, while the varied yellowish color is for the glossy component instead. 302Chapter 8 Creating a wasp-like chitin material with procedural textures In this recipe, we will create a material similar to chitin (the characteristic substance of the exoskeletons of insects) colored with a yellow and black pattern like a wasp, as shown in the following screenshot: The insect wasp-like material as it appears in the final rendering Getting ready Start Blender and open the9931OS_08_start.blend file, where there is an already set scene with an unwrapped Suzanne primitive object leaning on a Plane, an Emitter mesh-light, and a Camera. Go to the World window and enable the Ambient Occlusion item with the Factor value0.10. How to do it... Let's start immediately with the material creation using the following steps: 1. Click on the New button in the Node Editor window toolbar or in the Material window under the main Properties panel to the right, and rename the new materialchitin_ wasp. 2. Now, in the Material window, switch the Diffuse BSDF shader with a Mix Shader node, and label it asMix Shader2. In the first Shader slot, select a new Mix Shader node. In the second one, select a Glossy BSDF shader node. Label the new Mix Shader node asMix Shader1, and the Glossy BSDF node asGlossy BSDF_2. 303Creating Organic Materials 3. Go to the Mix Shader1 node, and in the r fi st Shader slot, select a Diffuse BSDF shader, and in the second one, select a new Glossy BSDF shader node. Label the latter asGlossy BSDF_1, and set its Roughness value to0.100 and Distribution to Beckmann, and change the Color value for R to0.039, G to0.138, and B to0.046. 4. Set the Glossy BSDF_2 node's Roughness value to0.040 and Distribution to Beckmann, and change its Color values for R to0.500, G to0.440, and B to 0.086. Set the Fac value of the Mix Shader2 node to0.025. 5. Add a Layer Weight node (press Shift + A and navigate to Input Layer Weight) and connect its Facing output to the Fac input socket of the Mix Shader1 node. Leave the Blend value as0.500, as shown in the following screenshot: The nodes for the base shader 6. Add a Texture Coordinate node (press Shift + A and navigate to Input Texture Coordinate) and a Mapping node (press Shift + A and navigate to Vector Mapping). Connect the UV output of the Texture Coordinate node to the Vector input of the Mapping node. Label the latter asMapping1. 7. Add a Voronoi Texture node (press Shift + A and navigate to Texture Voronoi Texture) and a Noise Texture node (press Shift + A and navigate to Texture Noise Texture). Connect the Mapping1 node's Vector output to their Vector input sockets. Set the Scale values of both the texture nodes to300.000 and then label the Noise Texture node asNoise Texture1. 8. Add a Bump node (press Shift + A and navigate to Vector Bump) and connect the Color output of the Voronoi Texture node to the Height input socket of the Bump node. Connect the Normal output of this node to the Normal input sockets of the Diffuse BSDF node and both Glossy BSDF shader nodes. Set the Bump node's Strength value to0.500. 304Chapter 8 9. Add a ColorRamp node (press Shift + A and navigate to Converter ColorRamp), label it asColorRamp1, and paste it between the Voronoi Texture node and the Bump node. Set Interpolation to Ease and move the white color stop to the0.059 position. 10. Add a Math node (press Shift + A and navigate to Converter Math), set Operation to Multiply, and connect the Fac output of the Noise Texture1 node to the first Value input socket of the Math node. Set the second Value to0.100 and connect the Value output to the Displacement input socket of the Material Output node, as shown in the following screenshot: Textures connected either as per the shader bump and the total bump to the Displacement input socket of the Material Output node 11. Add a new Mapping node (press Shift + A and navigate to Vector Mapping), label it asMapping2, and connect the UV output of the Texture Coordinate node to its Vector input socket. Set the Rotation value for Y to90° and the Rotation value of Z to45°. Set the Scale value for all three axes to5.000. 12. Add a Noise Texture node (press Shift + A and navigate to Texture Noise Texture) and a ColorRamp node (press Shift + A and navigate to Converter ColorRamp). Label them asNoise Texture2 andColorRamp2. 13. Connect the output of the Mapping2 node to the Vector input socket of the Noise Texture2 node, and the Fac output of this node to the Fac input socket of ColorRamp2. Connect the output of this node to the Color input socket of the Diffuse BSDF shader node. 14. Go to the Noise Texture2 node and set the Scale and Distortion values to2.000. Go to the ColorRamp2 node and set Interpolation to Constant, select the white color stop, and change the Color values for R to1.000, G to0.429, and B to0.000. 305Creating Organic Materials 15. Click on the + icon button to add new color stops until you have eight color stops almost evenly spaced along the slider (that is: color stop 0 at the0.000 position, 1 at the0.125 position, 2 at the0.250 position, then0.357,0.491,0.626,0.745, and0.886). 16. Select the last color stop, put the mouse pointer on the color slider, and press Ctrl + C to copy the yellow color; then, select the color stops numbered 1, 3, and 5, and paste the color (press Ctrl + V) so as to have a slider subdivided in eight parts, four black and four yellow, as shown in the following screenshot: The color pattern connected to the diffuse component How it works... f From step 1 to 5, we built the basic shader using two Glossy BSDF shaders with different colors to mimic a color shifting in the specularity areas. f From step 6 to 10, we built the chitin bump, assigning the pores to the per-shader bump but a general noise pattern to the displacement output (which, in this case, still works as a simple bump). f From step 11 to 16, we built a simple and random wasp-colored pattern; obviously, this can be changed and modified as you prefer, and actually should also be used on a more appropriate model; in this case, it would be better to make use of a painted color texture map to build a more appropriate and symmetrical color pattern. 306Chapter 8 Creating a beetle-like chitin material with procedural textures In this recipe, we will create a material similar to iridescent chitin (found in some kinds of beetles), as shown in the following screenshot: The beetle chitin-like material as it appears in the final rendering Getting ready Start Blender and open the9931OS_08_start.blend file, where there is an already set scene with an unwrapped Suzanne primitive object leaning on a Plane, an Emitter mesh-light, and a Camera. Go to the World window and enable the Ambient Occlusion option with the Factor value as0.10. How to do it... Let's start immediately with the material creation using the following steps: 1. Click on the New button in the Node Editor window's toolbar or in the Material window under the main Properties panel to the right, and rename the new material aschitin_beetle. 2. Now, in the Material window, switch the Diffuse BSDF shader with a Mix Shader node and label it asMix Shader2. In the first Shader slot, select a new Mix Shader node; in the second Mix Shader node, select a Glossy BSDF shader node. Label the new Mix Shader node asMix Shader1, and the Glossy BSDF one asGlossy BSDF_2. 307Creating Organic Materials 3. Go to the Mix Shader1 node, and in the first Shader slot, select a Diffuse BSDF shader, and in the second one, select a new Glossy BSDF shader node; label this node asGlossy BSDF_1 and set its Roughness value to0.200 and Distribution to Beckmann, and change the Color values for R to1.000, G to0.000, and B to0.562. 4. Set the Glossy BSDF_2 node's Roughness value to0.100 and Distribution to Beckmann, and change its Color values for R to0.800, G to0.574, and B to 0.233. 5. Add a Layer Weight node (press Shift + A and navigate to Input Layer Weight), label it asLayer Weight1, and connect its Facing output to the Fac input socket of the Mix Shader2 node. Leave the Blend value at0.500. 6. Add a second Layer Weight node (press Shift + A and navigate to Input Layer Weight), label it asLayer Weight2, and connect its Facing output to the Fac input socket of the Mix Shader1 node. Leave the Blend value at0.800, as shown in the following screenshot: The shader part of the material 7. Add a Texture Coordinate node (press Shift + A and navigate to Input Texture Coordinate) and a Mapping node (press Shift + A and navigate to Vector Mapping). Connect the UV output of the Texture Coordinate node to the Vector input of the Mapping node. 8. Add a Voronoi Texture node (press Shift + A and navigate to Texture Voronoi Texture) and a Noise Texture node (press Shift + A and navigate to Texture Noise Texture); connect the Mapping output to their Vector input sockets. Set the Scale values of both the texture nodes to300.000. 308Chapter 8 9. Add a Bump node (press Shift + A and navigate to Vector Bump) and connect the Color output of the Voronoi Texture node to the Height input socket of the Bump node; connect the Normal output of this node to the Normal input sockets of Diffuse BSDF and of both the Glossy BSDF shader nodes. Set the Bump node's Strength value to0.500. 10. Add a ColorRamp node (press Shift + A and navigate to Converter ColorRamp) and paste it between the Voronoi Texture node and the Bump node. Set Interpolation to Ease and move the white color stop to the0.059 position. 11. Add a Math node (press Shift + A and navigate to Converter Math), set Operation to Multiply, and label it asMultiply1; connect the Fac output of the Noise Texture node to the first Value input socket of the Math node. Set the second Value to0.075 and connect the Value output to the Displacement input socket of the Material Output node, as shown in the following screenshot: The bump is both "per shader" and as "total" bump (as in the previous wasp material recipe) 12. Add a new Layer Weight node (press Shift + A and navigate to Input Layer Weight), two Math nodes (press Shift + A and navigate to Converter Math), and a Hue Saturation Value node (press Shift + A and navigate to Color Hue/Saturation); label the new Layer Weight node asLayer Weight3. 13. Connect the Facing output of the Layer Weight3 node to the first Value input socket of one of the Math nodes; set its Operation to Multiply and the second Value to 0.700, and label it asMultiply2. 14. Connect the Multiply2 node's output to the first Value input socket of the second Math node, and the output of this node to the Hue input socket of the Hue Saturation Value node; connect the output of this node to the Color input socket of the Diffuse BSDF shader node. 309Creating Organic Materials 15. Change the Hue Saturation Value node's Color values for R to0.103, G to0.500, and B to0.229, and just for this example, leave the other values as they are, as shown in the following screenshot: Adding the final diffuse color How it works... f The introductory steps of this shader work almost the same as for the chitin_wasp material, that is, the basic shader from step 1 to 6 and the chitin bump from step 7 to 11. f From step 12 to 15, we build the color component coming from the Hue Saturation Value node, and thanks to the combination of the Layer Weight3 and Math nodes, this appears mainly in the mesh faces perpendicular to the point of view, sliding in the other spectrum colors on the facing-away mesh sides, basically behaving as a sort of Fresnel effect. The addition of the Hue Saturation Value node allows for further color tweaking. Creating tree shaders – the bark There are several different ways to make trees in a 3D package: starting from the simpler low-poly objects, such as the billboards used in video games (simple planes mapped with tree images on a transparent background), to middle complex objects where a trunk mesh is attached to a foliage mass made of little alpha textured planes, each one representing a leaf or even a twig, to more complex and heavy meshes, where every little branch and leaf is actually modeled. 310Chapter 8 In case you need them, you can find several free tree models in the Blender format and also their billboard versions athttp://yorik.uncreated.net/greenhouse.html. For this two-part tree shader recipe, we will instead use a model coming from the many environment assets of the CG short Big Buck Bunny, the second open movie produced by the Blender Foundation. All the movie assets are free to be downloaded, distributed, and reused even for commercial projects because the short is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license (refer to its official website at http://creativecommons. org/licenses/by/3.0/). The general shape of the tree and the leaves is pretty toyish. This is because they are elements that have been drawn to match the toon style of the furry characters, but it's actually perfectly suited for our demonstration purposes. The final rendered tree from Big Buck Bunny is shown in the following screenshot for your reference: The final rendered tree from Big Buck Bunny The tree model is composed of several parts: on the first layer, there are the tree_trunk, the tree_branch, and the tree_branches meshes, and on the second layer are the leaves, made by a single leaf object dupliverted on the tiny faces of the leaves_dupli object. (That is, the leaf_tobeswitched object is parented to the leaves_dupli object, and then, in the Object window and under the Duplication subpanel, the Faces duplication method has been selected, the Scale item checked, and the Inherit Scale value set to1110.000. This way, the leaf_tobeswitched object is instanced on the leaves_dupli object's many faces according to their location, rotation, and scale.) On the 11th layer, there are three leaf objects with three different levels of detail: a simple a fl t Plane, a subdivided and curved Plane, and a modeled leaf. Their presence is only to supply the low, middle, and high resolution mesh data. By selecting the leaf_tobeswitched object and by going to the Object data window, it is possible to switch between the leaf_generic_low, leaf_generic_mid, and leaf_generic_hi foliage levels of detail. 311Creating Organic Materials In the first part of this two-part recipe, we will create the material for the bark, as shown in the following screenshot: The bark material Getting ready Start Blender and open the9931OS_08_tree_start.blend file. For this recipe, deactivate the second layer, and in Outliner, select the tree_trunk object. How to do it... Let's start by creating the bark material using the following steps: 1. Click on the New button in the Node Editor window toolbar or in the Material window, and rename the material asbark. 2. Still in the Material window, switch the Diffuse BSDF shader with a Mix Shader node, and label it asMix Shader_bark1. In the first Shader slot, select a Diffuse BSDF shader node, and in the second one, select a Glossy BSDF shader node; then, label them asDiffuse_bark1 andGlossy_bark1. Set the Glossy_bark distribution to Beckmann, the Roughness value to 0.800, and the Mix Shader_bark1 node's Fac value to0.200. 3. Add a Texture Coordinate node (press Shift + A and navigate to Input Texture Coordinate), a Mapping node (press Shift + A and navigate to Vector Mapping), and an Image Texture node (press Shift + A and navigate to Texture Image Texture); label the last two asMapping1 andBark_color1. 4. Connect the UV output of the Texture Coordinate node to the Vector input socket of the Mapping1 node, and the output of this node to the Vector input socket of the Bark_color1 node. Connect the Color output of the Bark_color1 node to the Color input sockets of both the Diffuse_bark1 and Glossy_bark1 shader nodes. 312Chapter 8 5. Click on the Open button of the Bark_color1 node, browse to thetextures folder, and load thebark_color_tile.png image. 6. Press Shift + D to duplicate the Bark_color1 node, label it asBark_normal1, and connect the Mapping1 node output to its Vector input socket. Make the image datablock single-user by clicking on 2, which appears on the right side of the image name. Click on the Open Image button (the one with the folder icon), browse again to thetextures folder, and load thebark_norm_tile.png image. Set Color Space to Non-Color Data. 7. Add a Normal Map node (press Shift + A and navigate to Vector Normal Map), label it asNormal Map1, and connect the Color output of the Bark_normal1 node to the Color input socket of the Normal Map1 node, and then set the Strength value to2.000. Click on the UV Map for tangent space maps button upwards of the Strength one and select UVMap (the trunk mesh has two different sets of UV coordinates, which we'll see later). 8. Connect the Normal output of the Normal Map1 node to the Normal input sockets of both the Diffuse_bark1 and the Glossy_bark1 shader nodes, as shown in the following screenshot: The basic bark material that uses a normal map 9. Now, box-select (press the B key and then draw a rectangle) all the nodes except for the Texture Coordinate and Material Output nodes and press Shift + D duplicate them. Move them down and change their labels by substituting the 1 suffix with 2. Connect the UV output of the Texture Coordinate node to the Vector input socket of the duplicated Mapping2 node, and set the Scale of this node to0.350 for all three axes. 313Creating Organic Materials 10. Add a Mix Shader node (press Shift + A and navigate to Shader Mix Shader), label it asMix Shader_bark3, and paste it right before the Material Output node. Connect the output of the Mix Shader_bark2 node to the second Shader input socket of the Mix Shader_bark3 node. 11. Add a Noise Texture node (press Shift + A and navigate to Texture Noise Texture), connect the UV output of the Texture Coordinate node to the Vector input socket of the Noise Texture node, and connect the Fac output of this node to the Fac input socket of the Mix Shader_bark3 node. 12. Set the Noise Texture node's Scale value to15.000, as shown in the following screenshot: Making the bark material a bit more complex 13. Now, press Shift and select the tree_branch and tree_branches meshes, and as the last one, reselect the tree_trunk mesh to make it the active object; then, press Ctrl + L. In the Make Links pop-up menu, select the Materials item to assign the bark material to the other two meshes. How it works... f For this material, we built a simple shader using two tileable image maps, a color one for the Diffuse and the Glossy components, and a normal map for the bump. f Then, we duplicated everything and mixed the second material copy with different scale values to the first one by the factor of a Noise procedural texture, to add variety to the bark pattern and to avoid that unpleasant repeating effect that often shows up with tileable image textures. 314Chapter 8 There's more... At this point, if you look carefully at the Rendered view of the tree trunk, you'll see that sadly, there are ugly seams where the trunk's main body joins the big low branches as shown in the following screenshot: The visible seams at the branches joining This is due to the fact that the unwrap of the mesh has separated the branches' UV islands from the main trunk ones. Although the effect can be barely visible, let's say that you absolutely want to avoid this; that's why we are now going to see a solution for the problem, by using a second set of UV coordinates and a Vertex Color layer. This is what we are going to do: 1. Select the trunk mesh and go into the Vertex Paint mode; the mesh turns totally white, because that is the color assigned to the vertexes by default. Start to paint with pure black on the vertexes located at the joining of the low branches with the trunk, achieving this result: The trunk model seen in the Vertex Paint mode 315Creating Organic Materials 2. As you can see, the joining vertices edge loops are black but are smoothly blending into the white of the default mesh vertex color. This will be used as a stencil map to blend two different instances of the same bark material mapped on different UV coordinates. Go to the Object data window and rename the Vertex Color layer as Join_branches. 3. Switch to Edit Mode and select all the faces including the necessary vertices' edge loops; in the Object data window, under the UV Maps subpanel, click on the + icon (add UV Map) and rename the new UV coordinates layer asUVMap2. Place the mouse cursor on the 3D viewport, press U, and select Unwrap in the UV Mapping pop-up menu, as shown in the following screenshot: The trunk model in Edit Mode and the UV islands in the UV/Image Editor window 4. Go out of Edit Mode. Click on the user number to the right of the material data block in the Node Editor window toolbar and rename the new material asbark_seamless. 316