Powerpoint basics for beginners

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Lesson 10: PowerPoint Presentations Beyond the Basics POWERPOINT BEYOND THE BASICS Making interactive, non-linear slide shows and enhancing formatting 10 LEARNING OUTCOMES In the first PowerPoint tutorial you learned how to create and save a new presentation (the Screenbeans slide show). You saw a sample slide show (The Tudor Monarchs). You learned how to prepare an outline, you typed text for each slide, added clip art, and set timings. You added an effect to enhance the slide transition, you selected a color scheme, and may have even created a new background effect.. You changed the printer settings so that you can print out handouts rather than just individual slides of your shows. For many classrooms and for most K-12 students, what you learned in chapter 8 is just fine. But, if you're ready to take the next step and learn some more advanced skills with PowerPoint, or if you teach computer-savvy students who want more challenging skills to master, this chapter's for you. Most PowerPoint presentations you see in school or at work are what are called linear presentations. That is, each slide is designed to proceed one slide right after another. The first slide transitions to the second, which transitions to the third, and so forth. For many educational tasks, this is fine. But, what if... What if you want your students to create an interactive story, where, for example, younger kids could read about a dragon on Slide One, then choose, on Slide Two, any one of three possible places that the dragon could go? By clicking on the word "desert," the show would move to a slide describing what happens to the dragon in the desert. If the student clicks the word "forest," another slide appears with another ending. The learner thus participates, not by simply clicking on slide after slide in one, linear direction, but by making choices that affect what slide comes next, thus making the presentation interactive and non-linear. 309 ESSENTIAL MICROSOFT OFFICE 2010: Tutorials for Teachers Copyright © Bernard John Poole, Lorrie Jackson, 2010. All rights reserved A more common application of non-linear PowerPoint presentations is when reviewing knowledge—for what you might call interactive Drill & Practice. This lesson will teach you how to do that. Teachers (and even older students) can create quizzes using PowerPoint. In these slide shows, students are asked questions and then click on what they think is the answer. If the answer is correct, the show moves to the next question. If the student answers incorrectly, the show moves the student back to re-answer the question or, if the question is of the True/False variety, explains why the answer was incorrect before moving them on to the next step in the show. The movement from one slide to another is not one-way, not linear, but rather non-linear, the pathway through the show determined by the student's interaction with it. In this tutorial you will be introduced to the basics of non-linear interactive PowerPoint slide shows, along with some more advanced formatting and impact-enhancing tools. Amongst the skills you will learn are:  Using hidden slides, Action Buttons, and hyperlinks  Formatting and enhancing graphics  Inserting sounds, clip art, movies, and hyperlinks (including E-mail links) A caveat before you begin: If you have not completed the tutorial in Chapter 9 but feel fairly comfortable with the basics of PowerPoint, feel free to tackle this chapter. If you are not sure you know the basics of PowerPoint, however, skim Chapter 9 to make sure you're ready to begin. Good luck 10.1 ADDING ACTION BUTTONS AND HIDDEN SLIDES TO AN EXISTING PRESENTATION Action buttons For the sake of uniformity, you are going to work with a version of the Screenbeans presentation created specially for this tutorial. In the PowerPoint File menu click on Open Navigate on your disk to the Work Files for Office 2010 folder PowerPoint Files folder, then double click on the file Problems and Solutions to open it Action Buttons allow you to control the sequencing of the slides in a slide show. They also allow you to go to slides that would otherwise be hidden from the user’s view and passed over when the slide show is running. You will learn about such Hidden Slides in the next section of this tutorial. Action Buttons also can be used to direct the user back to a previous slide, or forward to the next slide, or to go directly to the first or last slide, or anywhere in between. Later in this tutorial you will learn about other PowerPoint tools that can be used to call up a movie clip or some other kind of multimedia document. You're going to put Action Buttons on each of the slides in the Problems and Solutions presentation. These action buttons will make it easy for the user to go back to the previous slide or forward to the next slide, and so forth. The first slide will have just one Action Button—to go to the next slide. The last slide will have two Actions Buttons, one to go to the previous slide and 310 Lesson 10: PowerPoint Presentations Beyond the Basics another to go back to the beginning of the slide show (Home). Every other slide will have an Action Button to go to the previous slide, an Action Button to go to the next slide, and an Action Button to go to the first (Home) slide in the presentation. Fig. 10.1 shows you how the Title slide will look after you've added the Action Button. Fig. 10.1 The Action Button on the Title slide OK, here goes. To use Action Buttons you must be in the Normal view so you can work on individual slides. In the Slide View toolbar (lower right of your PowerPoint window—Fig. 10.2) click on Normal view Fig. 10.2 The Slide View toolbar 311 ESSENTIAL MICROSOFT OFFICE 2010: Tutorials for Teachers Copyright © Bernard John Poole, Lorrie Jackson, 2010. All rights reserved Then, in the left hand frame of the PowerPoint window, click on Slide 1 (the Title slide) In the Insert Ribbon Illustrations Group, then click on the Shapes icon to show the selection of Shapes you can use in Office 2010 (Fig. 10.3) Action button for the Forward or Next Slide Fig. 10.3 The Office 2010 Shapes menu showing the Actions buttons From the Shapes Action Buttons panel (Fig. 10.3 above), click on the Action Button for the Forward or Next slide Now, without clicking, roll the mouse cursor down over the large version of the slide on the right of the PowerPoint window and notice that the arrow pointer changes from a pointer to a cross hair ( ) Position the cross hair in the lower right corner of the slide (where you see the Action button in Fig. 10.1 on the previous page), and hold down the left mouse button and drag to create a box about a half inch square (look again at the Action button in Fig. 10.1), then let go of the mouse button You can adjust the size of an action button any time you want by clicking on it and dragging on the handles around it. If the button you have created looks too large or too small to you, go ahead now and click on it, grab one of the handles and adjust the size to your satisfaction 312 Lesson 10: PowerPoint Presentations Beyond the Basics PowerPoint displays the Action Settings dialog box (Fig. 10.4). Click on this down arrow to see the menu of sounds Click in this box to Play a sound when the user clicks on the Action Button Fig. 10.4 The Action Settings dialog box (If you don’t see the Action Settings dialog box, right click on the Action Button and, from the pop up context menu, select Edit Hyperlink…) You want the Action Button to go from the Title slide to the Next Slide, which is the default setting in the Hyperlink to: box, but before you click on OK, let’s opt to play a sound which the users will hear when they click on the Action button (Fig. 10.4 above) Click to put a check mark (tick) in the box next to Play sound: then click on the down arrow at the end of the Play Sound box and, from the menu of sounds, select Arrow Now click on OK You should now see a professional-looking Action Button. We’ll test it shortly. If you ran the slide show right away and clicked on the button, it would advance you to the next slide with the whoosh sound of an arrow for good measure. You’re going to put this same button on the next seven slides, so you need to copy it so you can paste it onto the next slide (Slide 2) Make sure you still have the handles around the Action button (just click on the button to get the handles), then press ctrl-C to copy the Action button to the clipboard You're going to put three action buttons on each of the next seven slides—one to go back to the previous slide, another to go forward to the next slide, and a third to go back to the beginning of the slide show. 313 ESSENTIAL MICROSOFT OFFICE 2010: Tutorials for Teachers Copyright © Bernard John Poole, Lorrie Jackson, 2010. All rights reserved Click (in the left hand pane) on Slide 2, and immediately press ctrl-V to paste the copy of the Action button from the first slide onto Slide 2 Next, in the Insert Ribbon Illustrations Group click on the Shapes icon From the Action Buttons panel (Fig. 10.3 on page 315), select the Action Button for Back or Previous slide Slide the cursor down to the lower left corner of the slide and drag to draw an Action Button in the lower left corner (Fig. 10.5) Fig. 10.5 Position the Back or Previous Action button in the lower left corner of the slide You want this second Action Button to go from the second slide to the Previous Slide, which is the default hyperlink, but before you click on OK, let’s opt to play a different sound for the users to hear when they click on the Previous Slide Action button. Click to put a check mark (tick) in the box next to Play sound: then click on the down arrow at the end of the Play Sound box and, from the menu of sounds, select Breeze Now click on OK You should now see another professional-looking Action Button. If you ran the slide show right away and clicked on the button, it would take you back to the previous slide with the sighing sound of a breeze. Finally on Slide 2, in the Insert Ribbon Illustrations Group, select the Shapes menu and locate the Action Buttons panel 314 Lesson 10: PowerPoint Presentations Beyond the Basics In the Action Buttons panel click the Action Button for the Home slide (it looks like a little house), and once again, on the slide itself, drag to draw an Action Button in the lower center of the slide (Fig. 10.6) Fig. 10.6 The Home Action button You want the Action Button to go to the Home Slide (the First slide in the show), which is the default hyperlink in the Action Settings dialog box, but before you click on OK you need to have PowerPoint play yet another different sound. Click to put a check mark (tick) in the box next to Play sound: then click on the down arrow at the end of the Play Sound box and, from the menu of sounds, select Chime Now click on OK Slide 2 should now look something like Fig. 10.6 above. Copying the Action buttons to the other slides Once you have created a set of buttons for a slide, if you need to do the same on other slides in the presentation, all you have to do is copy and paste them. This is a lot quicker than recreating them on each succeeding slide and it is very simple to do. Hold down the Shift key on the keyboard, then click on each of the new buttons on the Confusion slide so that all three buttons are selected Press ctrl-c on the keyboard to copy them to the clipboard Click in the left hand frame on the thumbnail for slide 3 and press ctrl-v to paste the buttons onto the third slide Notice that the buttons are pasted into the exact same place on the next slide. Now go to each of the remaining six (6) slides in the presentation and do the same 315 ESSENTIAL MICROSOFT OFFICE 2010: Tutorials for Teachers Copyright © Bernard John Poole, Lorrie Jackson, 2010. All rights reserved Better save your work to this point The Problems and Solutions presentation is missing one final slide—the Acknowledgements slide, which should accompany any presentation where you use information or audio-visual material that is not your own. Adding a new slide to a presentation is easy. First, you want the Acknowledgements slide to be that last slide in the show, so, in the left hand frame, use the mouse to click immediately after the thumbnail for Slide 9 (you’ll see a dark grey bar flashing on and off to indicate that this is where the new slide will go) Now, on the keyboard, hold down the Ctrl key and, at the same time, press the letter ‘m’ (Ctrl-m), or, in the Slides Group of the Home Ribbon, click on the New Slide button The layout for the new slide will be the same as the other slides in the show, namely a Two Content layout. For the Acknowledgements slide it will be best if it is a Title and Content slide layout. In the Home Ribbon Slides Group, click on the Layout option to bring down the Layout menu In the Layout menu, select the layout Title and Content The buttons are slightly different on this last slide. You still want the Action Button to go back to the previous slide, and you need the one that returns you to the beginning—the Home Action Button. But you don’t need a button to go to the next slide. You’ve just pasted the three Action buttons onto each of the previous 7 slides, so the buttons are still available on the clipboard for you to paste onto the new last slide On Slide 10, the last slide in the show, hit ctrl-V to paste the three Action buttons here, too Now, click anywhere on the slide to deselect the three action buttons, then click on the Action button in the lower right corner (the Next Action Button) to select it alone, and hit the Del(ete) key to remove it from the slide Next, click where you see “Click to add title,” and in the Title box type Acknowledgements Finally, click in the large box below the Title box to add text and, by way of Acknowledgements, type the following (centered) on the last slide: Screenbeans courtesy of Microsoft Corporation Text courtesy of Bernie Poole You don’t want the bullets with the text, so, in the Home Ribbon Paragraph Group, click on the Bulleted List tool to toggle the bullets off (or select None from the Bullets menu) Hit Ctrl-S to save this (almost) final version of the Problems and Solutions presentation Your show is almost ready, but first you have to learn about hidden slides. 316 Lesson 10: PowerPoint Presentations Beyond the Basics Hidden Slides Hidden Slides are slides that will be bypassed unseen, as the user clicks through a presentation, except when the user clicks on an Action Button that specifically sends them to the Hidden Slide. Here are the steps to create an Action Button on one slide which will take the user to a specific Hidden Slide in the Screenbeans slide show. Make sure you still have the Slides tab selected at the top of the left hand frame, so that you can see all the thumbnails of your slides, then scroll back, if necessary, and click on Slide 2 (the Confusion slide) to make it the active slide Click to position the cursor right at the end of the text that you typed in the slide’s left-side text placeholder (after the words …tougher than it really is) Hit Enter to go to a new line, then type Click if you’d like to read a quote about problem-solving. In the Home Ribbon Slides Group, select New Slide (or press ctrl-M) to insert a new slide right after Slide 2—the Confusion slide Immediately, PowerPoint inserts a new slide right after the second slide in the show. Next, in the Home Ribbon Slides Group again, click on the Layout button, locate the Title slide layout in the selection of slide layout options, and click on it to select it as the layout for the new slide You want this new slide to be a Hidden Slide. In the Slide Show Ribbon Set Up Group, select Hide Slide Notice that there is now, in front of the thumbnail for the new slide 3, a box around the number 3 with a diagonal slash through it, which indicates that this is a Hidden Slide (Fig. 10.7). The Hidden Slide has a box with a slash thru the slide number Fig. 10.7 How to recognize a Hidden Slide in the thumbnail Slides menu 317 ESSENTIAL MICROSOFT OFFICE 2010: Tutorials for Teachers Copyright © Bernard John Poole, Lorrie Jackson, 2010. All rights reserved Click in the title placeholder on the new slide (where it says Click to add title), and type the following quotation (including the quotes): “Quality is in the details.” Click in the subtitle placeholder on the new slide (immediately above the title placeholder) and type the following: Bernie Poole, Esq. The Hidden Slide with the quote is now complete, but it’s hidden, so you have to give PowerPoint (and the user) a way to find it by creating an Action button that links to it. In the left hand thumbnail view of the slides, click on the thumbnail for Slide 2 (the Confused Screenbean) In the Slide Show Insert Group, select the Shapes button Action Buttons and from the Action Buttons panel click the Action button for Forward or Next slide Without clicking the mouse button, roll the mouse cursor down over the slide and notice that the arrow pointer changes to a cross hair ( ) Position the cross hair near the end of the text that you typed in the slide’s text placeholder, at the end of "Click if you’d like to read a quote about problem-solving" (Fig. 10.8), then hold down the left mouse button and drag to create a small Action button that you are going to use to link to the hidden slide (slide 3) Position the action button here Fig. 10.8 Placement of action button linking to the hidden slide Let go of the mouse button when you're done—you can still adjust the size of the button if you want by clicking on the button to select it and then dragging on the handles around the button 318 Lesson 10: PowerPoint Presentations Beyond the Basics PowerPoint displays the Action Settings dialog box (Fig. 10.9). The default Hyperlink is to the Next Slide and this is not what you want, so click on the arrow to the right of the Hyperlink to: box (Fig. 10.9) to show the drop down menu of Hyperlink to: options First, click on this down arrow to see the Action button Hyperlink options Next, click on Slide… to go to a particular slide in the presentation Fig. 10.9 The Action Settings dialog box Choose Slide... from this drop-down menu (Fig. 10.9 above) Now you will see a list of the slides in the presentation, including the hidden slide (Fig. 10.10). Fig. 10.10 The Hyperlink to Slide dialog box 319 ESSENTIAL MICROSOFT OFFICE 2010: Tutorials for Teachers Copyright © Bernard John Poole, Lorrie Jackson, 2010. All rights reserved Notice that Slide 3 has parentheses like this, (3), around the number for the slide (Fig. 10.9 above). This is to indicate that it is a hidden slide. Click to select slide 3 (“Quality is in the details.”) from the list of slides, click on OK, then click on OK again to exit the Action Settings dialog box This new Action Button now provides a link from slide 2 in the show to the hidden slide 3. When you run the show shortly and get to slide 2, if you do not click on this Action Button, slide 3 will be bypassed. You have to do one more thing to complete the content on the hidden slide (slide 3). You need to put an action button on there to go to the next slide. Can you remember how to do it yourself? If so, go ahead; but if you need help, here are the steps to follow: Click in the left hand frame on the thumbnail for slide 2 (the Confusion slide) Now click once on the action button in the lower right corner of the slide (the button to go the next slide), then press ctrl-c on the keyboard to copy the action button to the clipboard Next click in the left hand frame on the thumbnail for slide 3 (the hidden slide slide), and press ctrl-v on the keyboard to paste the action button onto the hidden slide Simple. Better Save all the good work you’ve done so far Animation Schemes PowerPoint Animation is a way of bringing objects, such as text and pictures, to life on the screen, controlling and sequencing how text and other slide objects emerge onto the screen during a presentation—sliding in from the right or left, or fading in, and so forth. Let's try some of the PowerPoint Animations now. In the left hand thumbnail view of the slides, click on the thumbnail for Slide 2 (the Confused Screenbean) In the Animations Ribbon Animations Group, click on the small arrow to bring down the menu of More Animation styles (Fig. 10.11) Click on this arrow to see More Animation styles Fig. 10.11 More Animation styles 320 Lesson 10: PowerPoint Presentations Beyond the Basics This will bring down the Animation styles menu (Fig. 10.12). Fig. 10.12 Animation Effects menu In the Entrance section of the menu, select the Fade option, and watch as PowerPoint gives you a demo of the effect Try out a few other animations to get a feel for what is available; then when you are done experimenting, Save the Problems and Solutions presentation again Notice that PowerPoint indicates the sequencing of the animations (Fig. 10.13). Fig. 10.13 Animations sequence Notice, also, that you can remove an animation scheme by clicking on None at the top of the Animation Effects menu (Fig. 10.12 above). 321 ESSENTIAL MICROSOFT OFFICE 2010: Tutorials for Teachers Copyright © Bernard John Poole, Lorrie Jackson, 2010. All rights reserved So you can experiment with different schemes, try them out, remove them if you don’t like them, and start over—all part of the design process. You can change any sequence, and you can also sequence the items to come onto the screen all at once, and so forth. There will be occasions when you will want to alter the sequence because, for example, you may decide that you want to talk about one topic ahead of another. Also, you may want the presentation to be presented as a running display in a conference room or in the lobby of a building. You can also determine the time you want each item to stay on the screen before the next animation is to come up. To do this, you would use the other tools in the Animations Ribbon. It is beyond the scope of this tutorial to dwell further on this topic, but you should find the time to play around with the tools available to you so that you can become an expert in the use of this beautiful teaching tool. Bear in mind that it’s not a good idea to apply Animation Schemes on all the slides. Animations are best used sparingly, to highlight specific ideas, or to spice things up in a presentation. But too much spice can overwhelm a presentation and take away from its enjoyment or effectiveness. Later in this lesson you’ll learn how to customize animation schemes, but first let’s create a basic interactive PowerPoint presentation. In the File menu select Close 10.2 INTERACTIVE POWERPOINT AT WORK Let’s start by looking at an example of an interactive PowerPoint presentation. You should still have the Work Files for Office 2010 folder available in the disk drive In the File menu select Open PowerPoint presents the Open dialog box for you to navigate to the Work Files for Office 2010 . Locate and open the Work Files for Office 2010 folder, open the PowerPoint Files folder, then double click to open the Mammal test presentation You’ll recall that the left hand frame of the PowerPoint window allows you to select either of two tabs: Outline or Slides. You'll use both of these shortly to create and order your own interactive slide show. But first you’re going to examine the Mammal test interactive presentation which has been prepared for you and which will demonstrate the various features of what makes a presentation interactive and non-linear. In the Slide Show Ribbon Start Slide Show, click on From Beginning to view the presentation Use the mouse (or space bar or right arrow key) to move through the slides—be sure to click on the Action Buttons or answers when indicated Answer at least one question incorrectly so you can see how the presentation takes you back to re-answer a question should you get it wrong Notice also the sound, clip art, and animation clip that are added to this show 322 Lesson 10: PowerPoint Presentations Beyond the Basics Features to look out for in the demonstration presentation General Layout of an Interactive PowerPoint Used for Assessing Knowledge Think of a test in your classroom. You start with a title on your test, so the students know what the test is on and who wrote it. Then you have an introduction, which might define the subject matter for the test. Alternatively, if used as a review, the introduction might summarize the concept being tested. A good interactive slide show thus begins with a title and an introduction slide (Fig. 10.14). Fig. 10.14 Title and Introduction Slides You then move to the set of directions which tell the user how to complete the test. The test questions follow right on after the directions. An effective interactive slide show should have a directions slide because a good teacher never assumes that all the students know how to take a particular test. After the directions come the question slides, which contain the questions themselves and the options for answers (See Fig. 10.15). Fig. 10.15 Directions and Question One Slide An interactive PowerPoint presentation has the same elements as any PowerPoint presentation, with one significant addition: question slides and feedback slides. In your class, you grade papers and return them, giving the students feedback on their answers. So, in the Mammal test slide 323 ESSENTIAL MICROSOFT OFFICE 2010: Tutorials for Teachers Copyright © Bernard John Poole, Lorrie Jackson, 2010. All rights reserved show, we have feedback slides that tell the user "You're Right" or "Sorry. Try Again" (Fig. 10.16). Fig. 10.16 Question and Feedback Slides Lastly, in any interactive PowerPoint it's appropriate to have a concluding slide which tells the students they’re done, followed by an acknowledgements slide (Fig. 10.17). Fig. 10.17 Ending and Acknowledgment Slides In this way, you set good precedent for citing sources, and you also clue your audience to the fact that it's over We'll talk more about the layout of an interactive PowerPoint as you begin creating your own. Action Buttons and Hyperlinks In order to move outside the linear box of traditional PowerPoints, we've used Action Buttons and Hyperlinks. Action Buttons are the square boxes with arrows in them that let you either move on to the next question or re-answer the previous one. These were discussed briefly in the previous chapter, but we'll pay special attention to them in the subsequent activities. 324 Lesson 10: PowerPoint Presentations Beyond the Basics A PowerPoint Hyperlink takes you directly from one place to another: if you are on the Web, the hyperlinks take you from one Web site to another, or from a website to your email program; if you are in a PowerPoint, the hyperlink might take you from a slide to your E-mail program, or from one slide in your presentation to another, or from a slide in your PowerPoint presentation to, say, a page on the Web. Notice the absence of transitions and animations in this Mammal Test presentation. The presentation has a simple, clean style. In the previous lesson, you learned how to use different effects for Slide Transitions and earlier in this lesson you were introduced to animations. These are certainly valuable tools that engage your viewers and can keep their interest. But everything has a time and a place, and in a testing situation, the bells and whistles aren't needed. They may, indeed, be an unwanted distraction. So much for an overview of using an interactive PowerPoint show. It's time to create your own interactive quiz. One final word before you begin: if you are a practicing teacher using this tutorial, and you consider yourself an experienced user of the computer, why don’t you create, or use an existing quiz of your own, a quiz based on your grade level or subject matter using the upcoming steps as your guide? Experienced computer-using teachers should have little trouble doing this. But if you're even the least bit fuzzy on how an interactive show works, stick with the mock test below for your first try. Then practice it later with your own curriculum Hit ESC to exit the slide show, then close (File Close) the Mammal Test presentation when you are ready to continue with the tutorial 10.3 BUILDING THE PRESENTATION You are going to use PowerPoint to prepare a simple test about the U.S. states and capitals, which will give you the experience to prepare more detailed interactive tests on your own. PowerPoint should still be open on your screen, so go to File New and click on the Blank Presentation icon (or simply hit Ctrl-n) to start a new slide show You’ll remember that it’s always a good idea to immediately save a new document Go to File Save, navigate to your Work Files for Office 2010 Data Files folder PowerPoint Presentations folder, give the new presentation the name States and Capitals Quiz, and click on the Save button It is usually a good idea to create the text outline for your slides before you select a template for your design theme, slide transitions, animations and so forth. This is because different templates have different slide layouts (bigger title boxes, less room for bulleted lists, and so on). So you will want to get a feel for the text on each slide before you proceed with design considerations. This brings to mind a good rule of thumb when creating anything that is designed to provide information for the purpose of effective communication: Substance Before Style Or, to put it another way, Content Counts Keep this in mind when developing any PowerPoint presentation. Let's get to work. Figure 10.18 illustrates the content you will be typing in for the first three slides of the U.S. States and Capitals quiz. Follow the directions on the next page to complete this first part of the task. 325 ESSENTIAL MICROSOFT OFFICE 2010: Tutorials for Teachers Copyright © Bernard John Poole, Lorrie Jackson, 2010. All rights reserved Fig. 10.18 Content for the first three slides In Lesson 9 you learned how to use the Outline tab in the left hand frame of the PowerPoint window to enter the text onto each slide. You can go ahead and use the Outline tab again if you want, as illustrated in Fig. 10.18 above. For this presentation, however, you might try entering the text directly onto each slide using the large version of the slide on the right hand side of the window (Fig. 10.19). Type the text directly into the text box on the slide Fig. 10.19 Enter the text directly onto the slide Either way works fine, so long as you follow the rule of thumb that it’s best to type in the text before playing with the slide design features of PowerPoint. Entering data directly onto slides can be tricky because you have to be careful how you use the Enter and Tab keys, so follow the directions carefully. Click inside the Title box on the slide itself (Fig. 10.19 above) and type U.S. States and Capitals Quiz, then hit Ctrl-Enter to move the cursor down to the sub-title box Now type, By ______ (type your name in the blank) The sub-title By _______ (your name) should now be in the sub-title box of your first slide. Hit Enter and, in the Insert Ribbon Text Group, click on Date and Time, then double-click on the date format of your choice 326 Lesson 10: PowerPoint Presentations Beyond the Basics Hit Ctrl-Enter (or Ctrl-m) to automatically insert a new slide, then, in the Home Ribbon Slides Group Layout menu select the Title and Content layout—the layout you’ll use for the remaining slides in the presentation Continue to type the information for the next 2 slides (see Fig. 10.18 above) Get to know the Keyboard Shortcuts You'll quickly learn that hitting Enter moves you to the next line within a text box. As you just did for the previous two slides, press Ctrl-Enter to move from one text box to the next (for example, from a slide's title to its bulleted list, or from one slide's bulleted list to the next slide's title box) Get used to using these keyboard shortcuts rather than reaching for the mouse, clicking on each slide, or selecting New Slide from the toolbar or from the Insert menu, and so on. For the more experienced user, Keyboard Shortcuts are a faster way to go Question and Feedback slides In a moment you are going to type the Question and Feedback slides, the content of which is in Fig. 10.21 on the next page. If you are a relatively experienced user of Office programs such as Word, and since you perhaps already have completed the introductory PowerPoint tutorial (Lesson 9), you should be able to carry out the following tasks without step-by-step help. However, in case you need some guidance, here are a few useful hints:  Before typing the first of the possible answers on each slide, click on the numbered list icon in the toolbar (Fig. 10.20) so that the program will automatically number your answers. Fig. 10.20 The Numbered List icon in the Paragraph Group of the Home Ribbon 327 ESSENTIAL MICROSOFT OFFICE 2010: Tutorials for Teachers Copyright © Bernard John Poole, Lorrie Jackson, 2010. All rights reserved  When you enter the information for each of the question slides (slides 4, 5, and 6 in Fig. 10.21), once you've typed the title in the Title Box (such as Question One), hit Ctrl-Enter to skip to the next box, then hit Backspace to get rid of the bullet that is automatically inserted by PowerPoint. Fig. 10.21 Question and Feedback Slides  If you want to further modify the numbering, you can click on the arrow in the Numbering tool (Home Ribbon Paragraph Group) and double-click on the number format of your choice.  After the question slides, type the content for the two feedback slides: You're Right (slide 7) and Sorry. Try Again (slide 8). Wait; don't we need these feedback slides after each question? Yes, so you'll need to make copies of these two slides and paste them in the right places in the slide show. We'll change the slide layout later as well. Now go ahead and type the five Question and Feedback slides (slides 4 through 8 of your show) illustrated in Fig. 10.21 above For any PowerPoint show, it is important to have a slide that signals the end of the main body of content (such as the end of testing in the case of our show). PowerPoint presentations that end abruptly can be disconcerting to a viewer. Also, it is important to give credit where credit is due. So, at the conclusion to most any slide show you should include an acknowledgements slide. These are your next two tasks. 328

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