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Creative Thinking techniques ideas

creative facilitation techniques for training and what techniques are used in creative writing and what are creative writing techniques and tips
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Dr.OliviaSimpson,France,Researcher
Published Date:03-07-2017
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101MOREGAMESFOR TRAINERS:ACollection oftheBestActivitiesfrom CreativeTraining TechniquesNewsletter Bob Pike Christopher Busse HRDPressContents Game Opener = O Team-building = T-B Categories: Energizer = E Review = R Communication = C Topical = T GAME Page Foreword.......................................................................................... vii Introduction..................................................................................... ix 1 O E C T-B R T Alphabet Review ............................................ 1 2 Autobiographical Scavenger Hunt .................. O E C T-B R T 2 3 The Winning Equation .................................... O E C T-B R T 3 4 O E C T-B R T Fact or Fiction................................................. 4 5 Group Goals ................................................... O E C T-B R T 5 6 Learn by Doing ............................................... O E C T-B R T 6 7 O E C T-B R T What’s a Metaphor For?................................. 7 8 A Matter of Taste............................................ O E C T-B R T 8 9 The Name Game............................................ O E C T-B R T 9 10 O E C T-B R T Old Dogs, New Tricks..................................... 10 11 How Much Is One Customer Worth?.............. O E C T-B R T 11 12 Practice Makes Perfect................................... O E C T-B R T 12 13 The Perils of Preconditioning.......................... O E C T-B R T 13 14 The Rope Game............................................. O E C T-B R T 14 15 Sneaky Slogans ............................................. O E C T-B R T 15 16 O E C T-B R T Success in Team-building .............................. 16 17 Role Reversal................................................. O E C T-B R T 17 18 True Confession Toothpicks........................... O E C T-B R T 18 19 Personal Introductions.................................... O E C T-B R T 19 20 Baby Pictures ................................................. O E C T-B R T 20 21 Play Ball ........................................................ O E C T-B R T 21 22 Body Parts...................................................... O E C T-B R T 22 23 Group Shuffle ................................................. O E C T-B R T 23 24 O E C T-B R T Tag Team Role Plays..................................... 24 25 Word Games .................................................. O E C T-B R T 25 26 Sea If Ewe Can Find the Errers...................... O E C T-B R T 26 27 O E C T-B R T Connect the Dots............................................ 27 28 Experience Levels .......................................... O E C T-B R T 28 29 Pennies Puzzler ............................................. O E C T-B R T 29 30 O E C T-B R T Killing Closed-Ended Questions ..................... 30 31 Name that Part ............................................... O E C T-B R T 31 32 Playing the Numbers ...................................... O E C T-B R T 32 33 O E C T-B R T On the Other Hand ......................................... 33 34 Point of View .................................................. O E C T-B R T 34 35 Question of the Week..................................... O E C T-B R T 35 36 Opening Scavenger Hunt ............................... O E C T-B R T 36 101 More Games for Trainers iii Introduction ike it or not, the age of entertainment in which we live demands that Lc lassroom trainers must work hard to capture and hold the interest of participants. If we don’t, we run the risk of being passed by in favor of “sexier” learning methods, such as high-tech computer- or video-based training. Fortunately, trainers have long known that one of the best ways to entertain and engage adult learners is to encourage them to play games in the classroom. And one advantage we have over any of the high-tech mediums that are capturing the attention of “cyber-trainees” is that we’re able to adapt the courses and the games we offer to match precisely the needs of our audience. We can assess participants, decide what kind of exercise is appropriate (and when it’s appropriate), and use games that will ensure that trainees are entertained… and course material is retained. That’s where 101 More Games for Trainers comes in. Carefully selected and properly implemented, the exercises in this new volume (a companion to the earlier 101 Games for Trainers) can help you actively involve trainees in course openers, bring a weary group back to life, develop communication skills, promote teamwork, lead an audience through a spirited review session, or address the special concerns of certain topical courses. A brief description of its purpose is provided with each exercise, as well as a reference for the amount of time the exercise will take, the ideal group size for the exercise, and a checklist of the materials you’ll need to make the exercise happen. And because these represent the best of the ideas collected in Creative Training Techniques Newsletter, you know they’ve been successfully “field tested” all over the world by trainers just like you. 101 More Games for Trainers ix Defining the Categories The exercises in this book fall into one or more of these six categories. Just below the title of each exercise, you’ll find a listing of these six categories. The small checkmarks beside each of the categories serve as guides for where best to use the exercise. Please remember, however, that these are only suggestions. With the right amount of imagination, the exercises here can be adapted to suit almost any training need. Openers These exercises, commonly known as “ice breakers,” serve as vehicles for getting participants to introduce them- selves or for putting trainees into the right “frame of mind” for the coming session. These exercises might vary according to the type of training being conducted, how big the group is, and how well the group members know each other. Also keep in mind the Law of Primacy: People remember best what we do first, so choose your openers carefully. (To be honest, nearly all of the exercises here could be adapted as some form of opener.) Energizers Designed to involve a group actively, these mid-course exercises are best used during the infamous mid-afternoon slump or anytime you feel a group’s attention might be waning. Often, these games take the form of energetic review sessions or stimulating brainteasers, or even a physical activity that gets people up and moving. The secret here is that these exercises aren’t always planned. The best strategy in developing a course is to have a handful of relevant energizers ready to go at a moment’s notice and implement one when you see attention begin to slip. x 101 More Games for Trainers Communication Use these exercises to make a point to trainees about the importance of communication, or to show where certain communication skills need improvement. Exercises that help enhance listening skills also fall into this category. As with “Openers,” a great many of the activities in this book could easily be adapted to make a point about communication skills, depending on how you position them. Team-building The purpose of these exercises is to help improve the relationship of individuals within a group— either a specific “work group” or simply a small group formed during your training session. These exercises are extremely challenging for trainers because they call for participants to work independently in small groups (usually solving some sort of problem) for periods of time that exceed other types of exercises. Your challenge is to keep things moving and to monitor closely the progress of the groups. Review The last words any group of trainees wants to hear are, “Okay, let’s review.” To keep participants from completely tuning out, these exercises often help disguise a review session as a light, interactive competition. One word of caution: When the competi- tive juices of some attendees get flowing, things can easily get out of hand. Your challenge is to keep the competition light and—whenever possible—to promote cooperation rather than competition. 101 More Games for Trainers xi Topical One of the challenges trainers face is finding games and exer- cises that pertain to a certain kind of session (customer service or diversity training, for example). While many other exercises can be adapted for those kinds of training, we’ve identified several “topical” games that work particularly well in specific situations. A Few Words About Using These Games Whether it’s the first time or the five hundredth time you’ve used games in your classroom, I believe there are some fundamentals you should be aware of when implementing these exercises.  Assess your audience and know the risks. Some of the following exercises will be natural hits with certain types of audiences, but others might bomb. Ultimately, it’s up to you to decide what kind of game to play with what kind of audience. But you also need to assess your own comfort level with “pulling off” these games. A rule of thumb: If you’re even remotely uncomfortable with an exercise, don’t use it. Participants will sense your hesitation and share your discomfort.  Never use a game without debriefing afterward. It might be obvious to you how a game enhances your subject matter, but it’s danger- ous to assume your participants are on the same page. Follow every game with a debriefing session to help participants ease back into the session itself, see the transition you’ve attempted to create, and assimilate the game’s learning points.  Be creative. Adapt, adapt, adapt. Nothing about any game in this book is set in stone. The trainers to whom these ideas are attributed were successful in using these games because they adapted the exercises to suit their own needs. Though you’ll be able to pluck many of them right off the page and insert them into your sessions, I challenge you to make these games uniquely your own whenever you can. The result will be an exercise that has even more relevance to you, your company, and your classroom. But most important, the result will be an exercise that’s more fun. xii 101 More Games for Trainers GAME 1: Alphabet Review Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To engage participants creatively in a review of course material. ❖❖❖❖ Time Required: 15 to 20 minutes. ❖❖❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited, but participants should play the game in teams of three to six. ❖❖❖❖ Materials Required: Index-sized “question cards,” prepared in advance by the trainer. Small “service” bells for as many as there are teams (the type found at service counters). ❖❖ The Exercise in Action: Prior to class, Bob Parsons, a training ❖❖ coordinator with Deluxe Corp. of Shoreview, MN, prepares a list of 26 questions and answers related to course material—one for each letter of the alphabet—and writes the question on the back of index cards, each with a different letter on the front. He splits the class into teams and gives each team a bell. He lists the letters on a flipchart page and has teams take turns selecting letters. As they select letters, Parsons crosses off that letter from the flipchart and reads the corresponding card. The first team to “ring in” tries to answer the question (if that answer is wrong, the first team to recognize that and ring in again gets a shot at it). When a question is answered correctly, Parsons hands the card to the successful team. In its shortened version, the game ends when all 26 questions have been read, with prizes going to the team with the most cards. If time permits, Parsons allows five minutes for the teams to spell as many course- related words as possible, beginning with only the letters they’ve earned. He awards prizes to the team with the longest list. 101 More Games for Trainers 1 GAME 2: Autobiographical Scavenger Hunt Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To break the ice and help introduce participants to one another. ❖❖❖❖ Time Required: 15 minutes. ❖❖❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited. ❖❖❖❖ Materials Required: A list of autobiographical information for each participant, prepared in advance by the trainer. ❖❖ The Exercise in Action: Dale Ditmanson, training specialist for the ❖❖ National Park Service, asks participants to send in an “autobiography” before his courses. As a course opener, he selects a line or two from each autobiography and types them as a list. Each participant is given a copy of the list as they arrive, and is then sent on a “human scavenger hunt” in the classroom until they discover which person matches each line on the sheet. 2 101 More Games for Trainers GAME 3: The Winning Equation Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To help participants think creatively in any type of training class. ❖❖❖❖ Time Required: 10 minutes. ❖❖❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited. ❖❖❖❖ Materials Required: Flipchart. ❖❖❖❖ The Exercise in Action: To help participants begin thinking about creative solutions to problems, Gary Polain, vice president of business development with Priority Management in Bellevue, WA, poses the following brainteaser: Polain writes the equation 5+5+5 = 550 on a flipchart at the front of the classroom. He then instructs participants to copy the equation and to add one straight line to make it a correct statement. Polain tells participants that while adding a line through the equal sign to come up with 5+5+5 ≠ 550 is good thinking, it isn’t the “right” answer he’s looking for. See “Answer” graphic below for the solution. Brainteaser 5+5+5 = 550 101 More Games for Trainers 3 Answer Connect the top of the first addition sign to the left arm of its cross. That way, you end up with: 545+5 = 550 GAME 4: Fact or Fiction Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To encourage participants to create their own review session and provide the trainer with a snapshot evaluation of the material. ❖❖❖❖ Time Required: 15 minutes. ❖❖❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited. ❖❖❖❖ Materials Required: None. ❖❖❖❖ The Exercise in Action: At the end of a training program, have participants evaluate the curriculum by helping them create their own “fact/fiction” sheets. Individuals or small groups develop a series of true or false statements based on the information covered. Once the statements are written, participants exchange lists and then attempt to identify which statements are true and which are false. The exercise provides a thorough review and evaluation, and can also yield good questions for future tests. 4 101 More Games for Trainers GAME 5: Group Goals Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To help teams learn to set—and meet—group goals. ❖❖❖❖ Time Required: 30 minutes, stretched over the course of a one-day session or over two days in a longer class. ❖❖❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited, but participants should work in teams of about four. ❖❖ Materials Required: None. ❖❖ ❖❖ The Exercise in Action: Faye Johnson, program specialist for the ❖❖ Bureau of Career Development, uses this technique to teach goal setting in teams: Step 1: Ask participants to list the three most important “things” in their lives. Do not define “things.” Have participants share what they’ve written in small groups and look for differences and common elements. Ask the group to consider whether the differences or similarities are affected by factors like age, job position, and upbringing. Step 2: The next day (or later in the day if it’s a one-day program), ask participants to imagine a stack of money—30,000 or more—on the table in front of them. Ask them to list how they would spend the money and then share the lists with their small groups. Point out how some people make budget lists while others just get excited and buy, buy, buy. Then reflect on the items they have listed as important in the previous exercise and look for discrepancies. Use this as a time to let each person reevaluate what is really important. Step 3: Ask participants to list 10 personal goals. They might include goals they have already achieved and goals not yet accomplished. Step 4: Prioritize the goals list. Then list the roadblocks that have kept them from obtaining the top three goals. Ask a volunteer to share his or her top three goals and roadblocks. Step 5: Have the group brainstorm to resolve problems or road- blocks. Demonstrate the group problem-solving technique and then stay clear of the process. Intervene only to keep the group on task, build network systems, ongoing analysis, and so on. Once this technique has been modeled for one person, you can allow the small groups to spend time working through the process with each individual. 101 More Games for Trainers 5 GAME 6: Learn by Doing Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical: Sales Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To help sales trainees more readily absorb product informa- tion, ultimately producing material that can be used in new sales trainee orientation, as review material, or as job aids. ❖❖ Time Required: 10 to 15 minutes. ❖❖ ❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited, but participants should work in small ❖❖ groups. ❖❖❖❖ Materials Required: None. ❖❖❖❖ The Exercise in Action: Product knowledge information can be readily adapted to a “learn by doing” exercise. For instance, Martha Krzic, a training specialist in telemarketing with Xerox Canada, taps the experi- ence of her sales training groups by asking them to brainstorm and list features and benefits of the products they sell, offer proof of those features and benefits, and put the items in descending order of importance. After several groups have done this, she compiles the information and uses it as a product resource manual for all new representatives in the organization. With new products continually being introduced, there is always a group working on a new “chapter.” The exercise acts as a review for the groups, and their experience benefits the organization as it is passed on to others. Similarly, Paula Peck, training officer at Union Safe Deposit Bank, uses small groups of four or fewer participants to create “features and benefits” charts for bank products. The charts include product names, features, benefits, target group, who handles the product, and any restric- tions and/or requirements. Each group completes at least four charts and presents them to the entire training session. The entire group then dis- cusses each chart. The charts can later be reduced or retyped on standard- sized paper and used as job aids when participants return to work. 6 101 More Games for Trainers GAME 7: What’s a Metaphor For? Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To challenge participants to develop metaphors from everyday objects as an exercise in creativity. ❖❖❖❖ Time Required: 10 to 20 minutes. ❖❖❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited, but participants should work in small groups of five to seven. ❖❖ Materials Required: A paper sack for every small group, filled with a ❖❖ variety of everyday objects. ❖❖❖❖ The Exercise in Action: Alana Gallaher, a program specialist for the Department of Education in Tallahassee, FL, places a variety of objects in paper bags, such as a rubber band, paper clip, penny, eraser, pencil stub, or pen. She gives one sack to each small group and asks members of the group to choose an object out of the sack and find a way to relate the object to the training topic. For example, a rubber band can be stretched—and a good instructor stretches the minds of his or her participants; a paper clip holds things together—and a good manager communicates with the entire team in order to build team spirit and hold people together even in tough times. 101 More Games for Trainers 7 GAME 8: A Matter of Taste Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To introduce participants to one another by uncovering their individual tastes. ❖❖❖❖ Time Required: 10 to 25 minutes. ❖❖❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited. ❖❖❖❖ Materials Required: None. ❖❖❖❖ The Exercise in Action: Dave Dahlen, a park ranger with the National Park Service, helps participants get acquainted by asking a series of questions that reveal individual tastes and interests. For example: “I enjoy… A. Classical B. Jazz C. Soul D. Rock …music.” Once each person has made a choice, participants divide into groups with similar musical taste. After a short get-acquainted period, another question is asked, such as, “I enjoy (A) Italian, (B) Chinese, (C) American, or (D) French cooking.” The groups then change, based on those answers, and another short discussion period takes place. 8 101 More Games for Trainers GAME 9: The Name Game Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To get small groups thinking together and creatively solving tough problems. ❖❖❖❖ Time Required: 20 minutes. ❖❖❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited, but participants should work in small groups of five to seven. ❖❖ Materials Required: A flipchart with the alphabet displayed vertically, ❖❖ prepared in advance by the trainer (see graphic). ❖❖❖❖ The Exercise in Action: After breaking The Name Game the class into small groups, Donna Adams, director of human resources for Miles Federal A N (Alfred Nobel) Credit Union, Elkhart, IN, displays a prepared B O (Brian Orser) flipchart page with the alphabet written verti- C W cally on it. She then asks a participant to D I share a random sample sentence from a news- E S paper or other piece of written material and .. .. spells out that sentence vertically next to the .. .. alphabet, creating random pairs of letters, .. .. th stopping the process when the 26 letter of Z T the sentence matches the letter “z.” (See example, using the sentence “Now is the time for all good men to come to the aid of their country,” ending on the “t” in the first “to.”) The groups are then asked to come up with names of famous people or fictional characters that match the random initials—for example, AN = Alfred Nobel; BO = Brian Orser—using each set of letters once and only once. The team with the most names wins a small prize. (Note: This exercise is not as easy as it sounds.) 101 More Games for Trainers 9 GAME 10: Old Dogs, New Tricks Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To show participants that the rules of written language are constantly changing. ❖❖❖❖ Time Required: 20 minutes. ❖❖❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited. ❖❖❖❖ Materials Required: A selection of old books, either fiction or academic texts. ❖❖ The Exercise in Action: People often regard the writing rules and ❖❖ styles they learned in high school or college as the final word on the topic and resist suggested changes. But written language, like spoken language, is in a constant state of flux, says Jane Watson, president of J. Watson & Associates, Toronto. People need to adapt their personal styles accord- ingly. To make her point, Watson asks how many in her business commu- nication courses have read Anne of Green Gables and enjoyed it. Several people usually raise their hands. She asks when they read it last. Most report it was years ago, during their childhoods. Most of the others have at least heard of the book. Watson then reads the first page of the book aloud. Participants usually find it dull and uninteresting. Many are surprised at how stilted the writing seems. Next, she reads the first few paraphrases from A Child’s Anne, the same story updated for today’s readers by Deirdre Kessler. Generally, all prefer the modern version. To show that the lesson applies in the workplace, Watson reads selec- tions from old grammar and style books—readily available in many used book stores—and compares them against the latest editions. Everything from punctuation to the proper closing of a letter has changed with time. The lesson gets people laughing and talking about changes they personally recall, Watson says, and opens participants’ minds to the possi- bility that some of the guidelines they use in business correspondence might be outdated and in need of change. 10 101 More Games for Trainers GAME 11: How Much Is One Customer Worth? Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical: Customer Service Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To quantify the need for a properly trained front-line staff. ❖❖❖❖ Time Required: 10 minutes. ❖❖❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited. ❖❖❖❖ Materials Required: A form similar to the graphic below, prepared in advance by the trainer. ❖❖❖❖ The Exercise in Action: While few people will argue that having a properly trained front-line staff is critical to a business’s success, it’s an idea that is often hard to quantify. As a result, managers of front-line employees might not know just how financially damaging a single poorly trained front-liner can be. To illustrate the point, Rick What Is One Customer Worth? Stamm, a partner with The Team  How much does your average a Approach in Brownstown, PA, customer spend during one visit to your store? asks participants of customer- service training sessions to com-  How often does that customer b visit your store each year? plete the form below. He says he (Multiply times "a") got the idea from the teachings of  A "lifetime customer" will stay c business consultant Tom Peters. with you for 10 years. “By the time people finish filling (c = b x 10) out the form,” Stamm says, “they  A "lifetime customer" will bring d realize it makes a lot of financial you at least one additional cus- tomer through referral. (d = c x 2) sense to invest some time and  How many customers does your money in making every employee employee interact with on an a productive member of the cus- average shift? tomer service team.”  This employee is managing a portfolio of your future business that is worth: (Multiply "d" times the customers/shift) 101 More Games for Trainers 11 GAME 12: Practice Makes Perfect Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To help participants recognize the innate ability they have to learn new material. ❖❖❖❖ Time Required: 10 to 15 minutes. ❖❖❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited, but participants should work in “rotating” pairs. ❖❖ Materials Required: None. ❖❖ ❖❖ The Exercise in Action: Carol Houseman, director of educational ❖❖ services for Mercy General Hospital, asks the class to form two concentric circles, with each person facing a partner. With the first partner, they share their answers to this question: “What is a skill you learned as a child that you still do well?” Once each partner has given an answer, the inner circle rotates one person clockwise, and the new partners discuss a second question: “What is a skill you learned as a child that you can’t do well now?” They rotate again and answer a third question: “Why did you retain that skill?” They rotate to new partners once more and answer: “Why did you lose that skill?” Finally, in small groups, ask participants to generate a series of learning points to help them retain the skills they learn from that particular class. 12 101 More Games for Trainers GAME 13: The Perils of Preconditioning Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To demonstrate to participants just how preconditioned the human animal tends to be. ❖❖❖❖ Time Required: 5 minutes. ❖❖❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited. ❖❖❖❖ Materials Required: Flipchart. ❖❖❖❖ The Exercise in Action: Ronald Rahn, a manager training specialist for the Lockheed Space Operations Co., secretly prints the words “red,” “rose,” and “chair” on a flipchart and covers them. He then tells partici- pants he will ask them a series of questions and they should shout their answers. He says, “Give me the name of a color, give me a name of a flower, and give me a name of a piece of furniture,” and writes the response he most commonly hears on the flipchart. When the hidden list is compared with the list made in class, he almost always has a complete match. Rahn uses this exercise as a springboard into a discussion of how conditioned people tend to be, and the importance of carefully examining our programming so that we are aware of choices we can make to consciously build new reactions and choices if needed. The results are similar when he varies the exercise by giving each person an index card and asking them to quickly jot down the name of a color, flower, and piece of furniture. He then asks them to compare their answers in groups of five or six and discuss reasons for any similarities and differences. 101 More Games for Trainers 13 GAME 14: The Rope Game Game Opener Team-building Categories: Energizer Review Topical Communication ❖❖❖❖ Purpose: To stress to teams the importance of achieving the right mix of team members’ strengths and limitations to reach desired goals. ❖❖❖❖ Time Required: 15 to 30 minutes. ❖❖❖❖ Size of Group: Unlimited, but only nine participants can play at one time. ❖❖❖❖ Materials Required: A long nylon rope; nine blindfolds; a good-sized room, free of obstacles. ❖❖ The Exercise in Action: Marilyn Russell, a nurse educator at the ❖❖ Dallas Medical Resource in Dallas, uses the “rope game” in team-building sessions: Up to nine participants can play the game. A good-sized room with all floor obstacles removed is needed. Participants are first asked to be blindfolded; if someone refuses, he or she can assume an “observer” role in the game. Then a long nylon rope is tied end-to-end to make a continuous circle. Blindfolded participants are led to the rope and asked to grab it. The trainer then instructs the group to form a triangle with the nylon rope, or some other simple geometric figure. It’s important that the trainer provide no other instructions. The group must then move together in a way that forms the geometric shape. Natural leaders and followers emerge as the group communicates and configures itself. When the group feels it has made the shape, participants remove their blindfolds to see how well they have done as a group. Next, blindfolds go back on as participants are instructed to make another shape. Those emerging as leaders in the first interaction are discreetly pulled aside by the trainer and told not to speak. Typically, that silence forces some of those who acted as followers in the first session to assume leadership roles. Russell then debriefs, stressing that it is only the use of highly effective communication and cooperation that makes forming the shapes possible. “Any team’s success depends on how well each member uses his or her strengths and weaknesses to balance out the team’s assets,” she says. “A good team-building atmosphere stresses the importance of each member and increases everyone’s self-esteem.” 14 101 More Games for Trainers