How to embed Google analytics dashboard

how to customize google analytics dashboard and how to share google analytics dashboard
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DavyGodwin,United States,Professional
Published Date:03-08-2017
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LESSON 4 Using the Google Analytics Dashboard In this lesson, you learn how to navigate the Google Analytics Overview page and Dashboard. Navigating from the Overview Page When you go to www.google.com/analytics/ and enter your email address and password to sign into the site, you see the Overview page, shown in Figure 4.1. This page lists all the sites (profiles you’ve FIGURE 4.1 The Google Analytics Overview page.26 LESSON 4: Using the Google Analytics Dashboard registered with Google Analytics, along with basic information about each site’s performance). NOTE: Multiple Accounts If your email address accesses more than one account, when you sign into Google Analytics, you see a page that lists each of your accounts. Click an account name to see the Overview page for that account. For each site, Google Analytics displays the following columns of infor- mation: . Name. The name or web address of the site. . Reports. Click the View Report link to access this site’s Dashboard, as discussed later in this lesson. . Status. A green checkmark indicates that the tracking code is correctly installed and that Google Analytics is receiving data from this site. A yellow caution triangle indicates that Google Analytics is not receiving data from this site; the tracking code may not be properly installed. . Visits. The number of visits to this site recorded during the selected timeframe. . Avg Time on Site. The amount of time, in minutes and seconds, of an average visit on this site. . Bounce Rate. The percentage of visits in which a visitor leaves the site without visiting a second page. (A lower bounce rate is better.) . Completed Goals. The number of completions of those goals you’ve set up for a site. (We’ll learn more about goals in Lesson 14, “Setting Up Goals and Funnels.”) . % Change. The percentage change, up or down, in the selected metric during the selected timeframe. You can display % ChangeDiscovering the Dashboard 27 for Visits, Avg. Time on Site, Bounce Rate, or Completed Goals; simply pull down the list and select the metric. . Actions. This column lets you either edit or delete a site profile from your Google Analytics account. You can change the timeframe for which these data are displayed by click- ing the Day, Week, Month, or Year buttons on the top-right side of the page. NOTE: Finding Profiles By default, the Overview page displays all profiles you’ve associated with your account. If you have a large number of profiles registered, you can search for specific ones by using the Find Profile box. Discovering the Dashboard Detailed information for each of your websites is displayed on a separate Dashboard page. You access the Dashboard for a given website by follow- ing these steps: 1. Sign into your Google Analytics account and access the Overview page. 2. Click the View Report link in the Reports column for the selected website. As you can see in Figure 4.2, the Dashboard is an overview of your site’s performance. It includes several graphs and tables that present key metrics in an easily grasped manner. It’s also your link to more detailed reporting, which we’ll discuss throughout this book. What do you find in the Dashboard? From roughly top to bottom, we’ll detail the major sections of the page. Overview Graph By default, the overview graph at the top of the Dashboard page, shown in Figure 4.3, charts the number of visits to your site over the past month.28 LESSON 4: Using the Google Analytics Dashboard FIGURE 4.2 The Google Analytics Dashboard. FIGURE 4.3 The Dashboard overview graph. You can display other data (pageviews, pages/visit, average time on site, bounce rate, and percent of new visits) by clicking the button on the top left of the graph.Discovering the Dashboard 29 TIP: Data Points You can display the tracked data for a specific date by hovering your cursor over the data point for that day on the graph. Site Usage Table Directly beneath the overview graph is the Site Usage table, shown in Figure 4.4. This table displays a number of key metrics that track your site’s performance, including the following: FIGURE 4.4 The Site Usage table. . Visits. The total number of unique times your site was visited during the selected period. . Pageviews. The total number of times your site’s pages were viewed during the selected period. . Pages/Visit. The average number of pages viewed per visit. . Bounce Rate. The percentage of visits in which the visitor doesn’t stick around—that is, the visitor leaves your site after viewing just one page. Obviously, a high bounce rate means that people aren’t inspired to more deeply explore your site; there may be something unappealing or not necessarily useful about the page they landed on. . Avg. Time on Site. The average amount of time (in minutes and seconds) that a visit lasts on your site. . % New Visits. The percent of visits from visitors who are new to your site.30 LESSON 4: Using the Google Analytics Dashboard You can display a full-page report for any of these metrics by clicking the item in the Site Usage table. For example, Figure 4.5 shows a full-page Bounce Rate report, with the bounce rate detailed on a daily basis. FIGURE 4.5 A full-page Bounce Rate report. Visitors Overview The Visitors Overview section, shown in Figure 4.6, displays a graph of the total number of visitors per day to your site. Click the View Report FIGURE 4.6 The Visitors Overview section.Discovering the Dashboard 31 link to view more detailed visitor information, shown in Figure 4.7, including total visits, absolute unique visitors, pageviews, average pageviews, time on site, bounce rate, and new visits—as well as links to technical information about the browsers used and the visitors’ connection speeds. FIGURE 4.7 Displaying more detailed visitor information. Map Overlay The Map Overlay section, shown in Figure 4.8, displays a map of the world with countries highlighted that provided the most visitors to your site. Click the View Report link to view more detailed information by country, as shown in Figure 4.9. Traffic Sources Overview The Traffic Sources Overview section, shown in Figure 4.10, displays a pie chart that categorizes where your site’s visits came from. Click the32 LESSON 4: Using the Google Analytics Dashboard FIGURE 4.8 The Map Overlay section. FIGURE 4.9 Viewing more detailed information by country. View Report link to view this data in more detail, including the specific search engines that drove traffic, as well as the keywords searched that brought up your site in their results.Discovering the Dashboard 33 FIGURE 4.10 The Traffic Sources Overview section. Content Overview The Content Overview section, shown in Figure 4.11, is a list of the most- viewed pages on your site. Click the View Report link for more detailed data about your site’s content—including links to a navigation analysis and a display of visitor click patterns for your page. FIGURE 4.11 The Content Overview section. Sidebar As useful as the Dashboard is, Google Analytics offers additional, more targeted reporting. You access this additional data from the sidebar on the left side of the page, as shown in Figure 4.12. The major reporting types accessible from the sidebar include the following: . Intelligence. Google Analytics Intelligence displays various auto- matic and custom alerts. Automatic alerts are generated when www.allitebooks.com 34 LESSON 4: Using the Google Analytics Dashboard FIGURE 4.12 The Dashboard sidebar. your site’s actual performance differs significantly from expected performance; custom alerts are those you create to be notified when a certain performance threshhold is achieved. . Visitors. These reports track various metrics related to your site’s visitors. Available reports include Overview, Benchmarking, Map Overlay, New vs. Returning, Languages, Visitor Trending, Visitor Loyalty, Browser Capabilities, Network Properties, User Defined, and Custom Variables. . Traffic Sources. These reports track the various sources of traffic to your site. Available reports include Overview, Direct Traffic, Referring Sites, Search Engines, All Traffic Sources, AdWords (if you’re an advertiser), Keywords, Campaigns, and Ad Versions. . Content. These reports track the pages and content on your site. Available reports include Overview, Top Content, Content by Title, Content Drilldown, Top Landing Pages, Top Exit Pages,Exporting and Emailing Dashboard Data 35 and Site Overlay. There are additional reports for Site Search, AdSense, and Event Tracking. . Goals. Do you have a defined goal for your site, in terms of visi- tors or sales or whatever? If so, you can set up those goals within Google Analytics and then track them with these reports: Overview, Total Conversions, Conversion Rate, Goal Abandoned Funnels, Goal Value, and Funnel Visualization. . Custom Reporting. If none of these stock reports are to your liking, Google Analytics also lets you create all manner of cus- tom reports. Click the Custom Reporting link to create any type of report you might need. Exporting and Emailing Dashboard Data If you want to view your site data offline, while you’re not connected to the Google Analytics site, you can download the Dashboard page in either PDF or XML format. You can also email the Dashboard data to yourself or to any others you specify. Exporting PDF Data To download a copy of the Dashboard page as a PDF file, follow these steps: 1. From the Dashboard, click the Export button above the overview graph. 2. When the panel expands, as shown in Figure 4.13, click PDF. FIGURE 4.13 Exporting Dashboard data.36 LESSON 4: Using the Google Analytics Dashboard 3. When the Save As dialog box appears, select a location for the PDF file and click Save. Exporting XML Data To download a copy of the Dashboard page as an XML file, follow these steps: 1. From the Dashboard, click the Export button above the overview graph. 2. When the panel expands, click XML. 3. When the Save As dialog box appears, select a location for the XML file and click Save. Emailing PDF Data You can also share your Dashboard data with others, via email. To email a copy of the Dashboard page, as a file attached to an email message, follow these steps: 1. From the Dashboard, click the Email button above the overview graph. 2. When the Set Up Email page appears, as shown in Figure 4.14, select the Send Now tab. 3. Enter the recipients’ email addresses into the Send to Others box. Use commas to separate multiple addresses. 4. If you want a copy of the email sent to you, check the Send To Me option. 5. Enter a subject for the email message into the Subject box. 6. Enter a message for the email message into the Description box. 7. In the Format section, select the file format you want to send: PDF, XML, CSV, CSV for Excel, or TSV. 8. Enter the “secret word” into the Word Verification box.Summary 37 FIGURE 4.14 Sharing Dashboard data via email. 9. Click the Send button. Google now sends an email message to the recipients you listed, with the Dashboard data attached to the message. Summary In this lesson, you learned how to navigate the Google Analytics Dashboard. In the next lesson, you learn how to customize the data dis- played in the Dashboard.This page intentionally left blank LESSON 5 Customizing Data in the Dashboard In this lesson, you learn how to customize the data displayed in the Dashboard’s overview graph. Displaying Different Metrics The overview graph in the Google Analytics Dashboard is a useful tool for viewing essential information about your site’s performance. It’s also a versatile tool; although it displays visits per day by default, as shown in Figure 5.1, it can also graph other important metrics in a number of differ- ent ways. FIGURE 5.1 The overview graph on the Google Analytics Dashboard. You can display the following metrics in the overview graph: . Visits (default) . Pageviews . Pages/Visit40 LESSON 5: Customizing Data in the Dashboard . Average Time on Site . Bounce Rate . % New Visits To change the metric displayed in the graph, follow these steps: 1. Click the tab at the top of the overview graph. 2. This displays the Graph Mode pane, shown in Figure 5.2. Select one of the available metrics. 3. Click the tab again to hide the Graph Mode pane. FIGURE 5.2 Selecting a metric from the Graph Mode pane. Comparing Two Metrics Sometimes it’s useful to compare two different metrics. For example, you might want to show both visits and pages per visit, as shown in Figure 5.3, to get a more complete picture of those visits to your site. FIGURE 5.3 Comparing two metrics on the same graph.Graphing by Day, Week, or Month 41 To display two metrics on the same graph, follow these steps: 1. Click the tab at the top of the overview graph. 2. When the Graph Mode pane appears, click the Compare Two Metrics option. 3. This changes the pane to display a two-column list of available metrics, as shown in Figure 5.4. Select one metric from the left (blue) column and another from the right (orange). FIGURE 5.4 Selecting two metrics to graph. 4. Click the tab again to hide the Graph Mode pane. The first metric you selected, from the left column, displays as a blue line on the graph. The second metric you selected, from the right column, dis- plays as an orange line on the graph. Graphing by Day, Week, or Month By default, the graph displays one data point for each day of the selected timeframe. You can, however, change this so that the graph displays one data point per week or per month. This is useful if you’re graphing data for a long timeframe—several months, perhaps. To change the data point display, click either the Day, Week, or Month but- ton in the Graph By section at the top right of the graph, shown in Figure 5.5.42 LESSON 5: Customizing Data in the Dashboard FIGURE 5.5 Selecting whether a single data point displays a day, week, or month’s worth of data. Changing the Date Range By default, the overview graph displays data for the past month. You can, however, change the date range displayed on the graph. Follow these steps: 1. Click the down arrow next to the date range at the top right of the overview graph. 2. This expands the Date Range pane, as shown in Figure 5.6. Select the Calendar tab. FIGURE 5.6 Selecting the range of dates to display from the Date Range pane. 3. There are several ways to select a date range. The first way is to click the first date of the range on the calendar and then click the last date in the range. This selects all dates in between the two selected dates. 4. The second way to select a date range is to enter the first and last dates into the Date Range boxes. 5. You can also select the Timeline tab, shown in Figure 5.7, and drag the left and right handles to select a given date range. 6. When you’ve selected the desired date range, click the Apply but- ton.Comparing Two Different Date Ranges 43 FIGURE 5.7 Selecting a date range from the Timeline tab in the Date Range pane. Comparing Two Different Date Ranges Another useful option is to display data from two different date ranges. You can, for example, display the average time on site data for the current month and the previous month, as shown in Figure 5.8. This lets you com- pare performance over two similar periods. FIGURE 5.8 Comparing data from two different date ranges. To compare data for two different date ranges, follow these steps: 1. Click the down arrow next to the date range at the top right of the overview graph. 2. When the Date Range pane appears, select the Calendar tab. 3. Click the Compare to Past option; this changes the pane, as shown in Figure 5.9. www.allitebooks.com 44 LESSON 5: Customizing Data in the Dashboard FIGURE 5.9 Comparing to past data. 4. Enter the first date range you want to compare into the Date Range boxes. 5. Enter the second date range you want to compare into the Compare to Past boxes. 6. Click the Apply button. Filtering Results by Segment By default, the overview graph displays data for all visitors to your site. You can, however, filter this data to display only information about certain types of visitors. In particular, you can filter the results by the following visitor segments: . All Visits (default) . New Visitors (people who haven’t been to your site before) . Returning Visitors (people who have been to your site before) . Paid Search Traffic (traffic from AdWords and other PPC adver- tisements) . Non-Paid Search Traffic (traffic from organic search results, such as Google search) . Search Traffic (traffic from both organic and paid search)

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