What do internal Auditors look for

what internal and external auditors do and what is an internal audit observation
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Guide to Internal Audit Frequently Asked Questions About Developing and Maintaining an Effective Internal Audit Function Second EditionTable of Contents Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 1 The Internal Audit Profession ...................................................................................................... 3 1. What is internal auditing? ................................................................................................................................... 3 2. How is the internal audit profession regulated? ................................................................................................. 3 3. Is continuing professional education (CPE) required for internal auditors? ..................................................... 4 4. Are internal auditors required to be certified? .................................................................................................... 4 5. Are there professional standards that govern the practice of internal auditing? ............................................... 4 6. Are internal audit functions required to follow The IIA Standards? .................................................................. 5 7. What are The IIA Practice Advisories? .............................................................................................................. 5 8. What jurisdiction do the SEC and the PCAOB have over internal auditors? ................................................... 5 9. Can existing employees become internal auditors? ............................................................................................ 6 10. What personal qualities, knowledge and skills should internal auditors possess? ............................................. 6 11. Do internal auditors have to comply with any professional ethics requirements? ............................................ 6 12 How much should a company spend on internal audit? .................................................................................... 7 13. Are there industry groups for internal auditors? ................................................................................................. 8 14. Isn’t internal auditing a duplication of what external auditors do? .................................................................... 8 15. How is “independence” defined differently for internal auditors and external auditors? ................................. 9 16. What role and responsibility do internal auditors have for fraud? .................................................................. 10 17. Are there university programs in internal auditing? ......................................................................................... 11 18. What is the Common Body of Knowledge? ..................................................................................................... 11 Starting an Internal Audit Function .............................................................................................12 19. How do we start an internal audit function? ..................................................................................................... 12 20. How should an internal audit function be staffed? .......................................................................................... 13 21. To whom should the head of internal audit report? ......................................................................................... 13 22. Can employees in the company participate in internal audits? ........................................................................ 14 23. What are the pros and cons of outsourcing/co-sourcing internal audit? ........................................................ 14 24. Where do I get more information on internal auditing? ................................................................................. 16 The Process of Internal Auditing .................................................................................................. 17 25. How is internal audit work actually performed? .............................................................................................. 17 26. Should an internal audit function consider information technology risks? ..................................................... 18 27. What types of IT audit skills should be included in an internal audit department? ....................................... 19 28. What should we look for in an internal audit report? ....................................................................................... 20 29. What is control self-assessment (CSA)? ........................................................................................................... 20 Indicates new or substantially revised material (in comparison to the first Guide to Internal Audit FAQs i edition of this resource guide)30. Is there a standard definition for internal controls? ........................................................................................ 21 31. How does the COSO internal control framework relate to internal auditing? ............................................. 21 32. Are internal auditors required to follow COSO? ............................................................................................. 22 33. What is the COSO ERM framework and what is its relevance to internal auditing? ................................... 22 34. Are there specific performance measures for internal auditing? ..................................................................... 23 35. Should internal audit departments consider using an automated work paper software package? .......................25 36. What factors should internal audit consider when issuing an opinion on internal control? ...............................26 37. What is an integrated audit? ............................................................................................................................. 27 38. What is continuous monitoring and how does it strengthen the internal audit process? .............................. 27 39. How can internal audit assist in developing and maintaining an effective corporate governance environment? ................................................................................................................ 28 40. To what degree should the internal audit function coordinate its activities with its external audit firm? .............................................................................................................................................28 41. What should the role of internal audit be in connection with a company’s compliance efforts? ................... 29 42. Should an internal audit function coordinate its efforts with the company’s chief risk officer? ..................... 29 43. What should the role of internal audit be in evaluating a company’s use of outsourced services? ......................30 Performing a Quality Assessment Review ...................................................................................31 44. Should internal audit conduct a quality assessment review (QAR) periodically? ........................................... 31 45. How does completing a quality assessment review strengthen the value internal audit brings to the organization? ............................................................................................... 32 46. What types of assessments are available to comply with quality assessment review requirements? .........32 Internal Audit’s Role in Sarbanes-Oxley Compliance ................................................................... 34 47. Does the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 require companies to have an internal audit function? ..................... 34 48. Should internal auditors play a role in our Sarbanes-Oxley activities? .......................................................... 34 49. How has the role of internal audit in Sarbanes-Oxley compliance changed since the inception of the legislation in 2002? ................................................................................................. 35 50. Is an ineffective internal audit function a significant deficiency under Section 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley? ..........................................................................................................................36 51. Are there alternative structures to consider outside of internal audit when planning ongoing compliance with Sarbanes-Oxley? ............................................................................ 37 52. Is it important for an internal audit function to adhere to The IIA Standards as it relates to Sarbanes-Oxley? ......................................................................................... 37 53. Can external auditors rely on the work of internal auditors relating to Section 404 compliance? ............... 38 54. What does it mean to “rebalance” the internal audit function? ...................................................................... 40 55. Why should companies evaluate the need to rebalance their internal audit functions? ................................ 40 56. How should organizations align their Sarbanes-Oxley and internal audit resources to achieve effective rebalancing? ............................................................................... 41 Indicates new or substantially revised material (in comparison to the first ii edition of this resource guide)Management and Audit Committee Considerations .................................................................... 42 57. How can management utilize internal audit most effectively? ........................................................................42 58. What should the audit committee’s relationship be with an organization’s board of directors, compensation committee, disclosure committee, and nominating and governance committee? .................................................................................................... 43 59. What is the audit committee’s role with respect to establishing and monitoring corporate governance practices? ................................................................................................... 43 60. What is an audit committee’s role with respect to an internal audit function? ............................................... 44 61. Should executive sessions (without management present) be held with the internal auditors as part of an audit committee meeting? ................................................................................ 44 62. What should internal audit report to the audit committee? ............................................................................. 44 63. What is the audit committee’s role in evaluating the chief audit executive (CAE)? ........................................ 45 64. How should the audit committee evaluate the effectiveness of internal audit?................................................ 46 65. What is the role of the audit committee in evaluating the role of the external auditor? ................................. 46 External Auditor Considerations ................................................................................................. 47 66. Can we use our external auditors to perform internal audit work? .................................................................. 47 67. Can external auditors rely on the work of internal auditors in connection with their financial statement audit? ................................................................................................................. 47 68. Do all internal audit reports need to be reviewed by the external auditor? .................................................... 49 69. Can a company’s external auditors perform an external quality assessment review of the company’s internal audit function?.............................................................................................. 49 The NYSE Internal Audit Requirement ..........................................................................................50 70. What companies are impacted by the SEC’s approval of the NYSE rules? .................................................... 50 71. What do the NYSE rules require? .................................................................................................................... 50 72. Does the NYSE provide listed companies with any instructions or guidance beyond the rule requiring an internal audit function? ..................................................................................... 50 73. When are the rules effective? ............................................................................................................................ 51 74. When and how does this rule regarding internal audit apply to companies transferring from another stock exchange? ...................................................................................................... 51 75. Must foreign private issuers comply with this rule? ......................................................................................... 51 76. Does the rule apply to companies with public debt? ........................................................................................ 51 77. Does the rule affect other stock exchanges and private companies? ................................................................ 51 78. Are there similar proposals in process requiring an internal audit function for companies listed on other exchanges in the United States? ....................................................................... 52 79. When and how does this rule regarding internal audit apply to initial public offerings (IPOs) listing on the NYSE? .............................................................................................................. 52 80. Does this rule require a company to hire new employees? .............................................................................. 52 81. What is required if a company already has an internal audit function? ............................................................ 53 Indicates new or substantially revised material (in comparison to the first Guide to Internal Audit FAQs iii edition of this resource guide)82. Can part-time internal auditors meet the NYSE rule? .................................................................................... 53 83. How will NYSE-listed companies be expected to demonstrate compliance with the internal audit rule? ........................................................................................................... 53 84. Does the rule require a written internal audit charter? .................................................................................... 53 85. Does the NYSE rule require that The IIA Standards be followed? ................................................................. 54 86. Have internal audit functions been required previously? ................................................................................. 54 87. Is there any minimum amount of expenditure or effort required under the NYSE rule? .............................. 54 88. What must a company have in place by the effective date of the NYSE rule? ................................................. 55 89. Is a formal risk assessment required? Is there a preferred framework to be utilized by the internal audit function, such as the COSO internal control framework and COSO ERM framework? ............................................................................................ 55 90. What other authoritative views strongly recommend the establishment of an independent internal audit function? ........................................................................................................ 55 Appendix A – The IIA Practice Advisory 1000-1: Internal Audit Charter .......................................... 57 Appendix B – Internal Audit Charter – Sample ............................................................................ 57 Appendix C – Establishing an Internal Audit Shop ....................................................................... 60 Appendix D – Summary Outline of The IIA Standards ................................................................... 61 Appendix E – The IIA Code of Ethics ............................................................................................ 63 Appendix F – Internal Audit–Related Organizations and Links ...................................................... 65 Appendix G – The IIA’s Internal Auditing Education Partnership (IAEP) .......................................... 66 Appendix H – About The Institute of Internal Auditors .................................................................. 69 Appendix I – Sample Job Description .......................................................................................... 69 Appendix J – Protiviti’s Internal Audit Capabilities and Needs Survey ........................................... 72 Appendix K – NYSE Internal Audit Rule ....................................................................................... 74 Glossary of Commonly Used Acronyms and Terms ...................................................................... 75 About Protiviti Inc. .................................................................................................................... 77 SM KnowledgeLeader .................................................................................................................. 78 Protiviti’s Governance Portal for Internal Audit ............................................................................ 79 Protiviti Internal Audit Practice – Contact Information ................................................................. 80 ivIntroduction “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” –Peter Drucker The internal audit (IA) profession has undergone remarkable growth since 2004, when we published the first edition of our Guide to Internal Audit. At that time, we determined guidance was needed to address a number of pivotal regulatory developments, most notably the revised listing requirements from the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) that stated for the first time, “Every listed company must have an internal audit function.” Five years later, companies are far more likely to have in place highly developed IA functions that address not only the NYSE standards, but also the SEC’s interpretive guidance on Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and PCAOB Auditing Standard No. 5 (AS5), An Audit of Internal Control Over Financial Reporting That Is Integrated With an Audit of Financial Statements, both of which were n fi alized in 2007. These regulatory developments have had a significant impact on internal audit functions. Given these and other changes, as well as the many lessons learned since the enactment of Sarbanes-Oxley in 2002, we decided our clients and the business community could benefit from a second edition of our resource guide of frequently asked questions about the practice of internal auditing. Guide to Internal Audit is designed to be a helpful and easy-to-access resource that IA professionals can refer to regularly in their jobs. The publication offers detailed insights into everything from building an IA function to managing and improving the function as the organization evolves. To facilitate the location of topics of most interest to our readers, the questions are divided into eight sections. In the table of contents, new and significantly revised questions from the first edition are noted with an asterisk. Many of these new questions focus on Sarbanes- Oxley best practices and the ever-expanding role of IA functions. As can be seen in our new questions and responses, the requirements – and some might say burden – of Sarbanes- Oxley compliance have eased over the past few years. Companies have developed best practices gained from hard-earned experience – and consequently, have greater confidence than before to adopt such practices. And as a result, costs for Sarbanes-Oxley compliance have begun to fall. According to a recent survey by the Financial Executives International (FEI), Section 404 auditing costs have dropped by 5.4 percent. This is in line with 1 Protiviti’s 2008 rebalancing survey findings, which found that both the SEC’s interpretive guidance on Section 404 and PCAOB AS5 are having their desired effects of making Sarbanes-Oxley compliance easier and more cost-effective for organizations – enabling them to devote more of their time to more traditional and broader internal auditing responsibilities. The IA profession has undergone significant changes since the NYSE issued its new listing standard requiring an internal audit function, and it is likely the landscape will be different in another four years. At Protiviti, we look forward to assisting organizations and their internal audit functions in addressing the current landscape along with the many changes that undoubtedly lie ahead. We hope this resource guide proves beneficial as part of your efforts to enhance your internal audit processes for the betterment of your business. Protiviti Inc. January 2009 1 Moving Internal Audit Back into Balance, available at www.protiviti.com Guide to Internal Audit FAQs 1Acknowledgements Protiviti wishes to thank The Institute of Internal Auditors both for providing material for this resource guide and for ably leading the IA profession through the evolving landscape. All information in the questions, answers and appendices that is attributed to The Institute of Internal Auditors, including its International Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing (Standards), definition of internal auditing, Code of Ethics, practice advisories and other material, has been republished by Protiviti with approval from The IIA. (Information copyright 2008 by The Institute of Internal Auditors Inc., 247 Maitland Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32710-4201 U.S.A. Reprinted with permission.) Note: This booklet is provided for general information only and is not intended to be a legal analysis or advice. Companies should seek legal counsel and appropriate advisors for advice on specic fi questions as they relate to their unique circumstances. 2The Internal Audit Profession 1. What is internal auditing? The internal audit profession, through The Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA), has continued to redefine itself as business risk and organizational complexity have evolved. Prior to June 1999, The IIA defined internal auditing as follows: Internal auditing is an independent appraisal function established within an organization to examine and evaluate its activities as a service to the organization. The objective of internal auditing is to assist members of the organization in the effective discharge of their responsibilities. To this end, internal auditing fur- nishes them with analyses, appraisals, recommendations, counsel and information concerning the activities reviewed. The audit objective includes promoting effective control at reasonable cost. Today, The IIA uses the following definition: Internal auditing is an independent, objective assurance and consulting activity designed to add value and improve an organization’s operations. It helps an organization accomplish its objectives by bringing a sys- tematic, disciplined approach to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of risk management, control and governance processes. The new definition is part of the Professional Practices Framework currently projected to be revised and reis- sued in 2009. Adherence to The Professional Practice of Internal Auditing (The IIA Standards) includes following this definition. Companies may choose to develop their own definition to best meet their needs. There is no regulatory requirement on how a company must define internal auditing. However, The IIA definition is gener - ally accepted, and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and other regulatory bodies may reasonably be expected to accept and adopt The IIA’s definition of internal auditing. Note: The IIA promulgates internal audit standards and practice advisories. Effective January 2004, The IIA’s Internal Auditing Standards Board (IASB) is responsible for revising and updating The IIA Standards. The IIA Standards are updated to reflect current risk management and governance requirements. Ongoing updates incorpo - rate numerous comments on issues received through a worldwide solicitation and public exposure process, upon which the IASB approves The IIA Standards for implementation. 2. How is the internal audit profession regulated? The internal audit profession presently is not regulated by the SEC, Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) or any U.S. government agency. The IIA is the self-governing professional body that includes the IASB, which is charged with evaluating and developing practice standards that are issued in draft form and subject to a public comment period, much like other professional standards and accounting pronouncements. The IIA Standards includes a code of ethics that members must follow or face disciplinary action, including expulsion. (See Question 5 and Appendix E.) Guide to Internal Audit FAQs 33. Is continuing professional education (CPE) required for internal auditors? ® ® Yes, practicing internal auditors who hold the Certified Internal Auditor (CIA ) designation must complete and report 80 CPE hours every two years. The CIA is issued by The IIA to individuals who pass a comprehensive examination and meet educational, experience and character requirements. In addition, many internal auditors are Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) or Chartered Accountants (CAs), designations that also require a mini - mum of 20 related CPE units per two-year period to maintain public accountancy certic fi ation (this may vary among boards of accountancy). Because internal auditors may hold multiple certic fi ations, such as the Certie fi d Information Systems Auditor (CISA), Certie fi d Fraud Examiner (CFE) and other specialized certic fi ations, it is not uncommon for CPE credits to count toward several closely related certification programs. (Individuals holding such certifications should consult the respective certification body for exact CPE requirements.) CIAs are expected to maintain the high standards of the internal audit profession by selecting quality educa- tional programs to fulfill the CPE requirements. 4. Are internal auditors required to be certified? No. However, The IIA Standards require technical competence and training that can be demonstrated by various certifications, depending upon expertise and professional experience. The IIA also sponsors several additional certifications beyond the CIA, such as: ® CFSA – Certified Financial Services Auditor ® CCSA – Certification in Control Self-Assessment ® CGAP – Certified Government Auditing Professional Additional internal audit-related certifications supported by other independent professional organizations include: CISA – Certified Information Systems Auditor CFE – Certified Fraud Examiner In addition, the valuable CPA certification is recognized separately by each state. The CA designation, also valuable, is regulated by individual countries. For more information, see Question 3 and Appendix F. Effective internal audit functions require most existing professionals and new hires to obtain and then maintain at least one certification, including but not limited to the CPA, CA, CIA, CISA and CFE. All certifications require annual CPE training. Skill sets, experience and industry familiarity are crucial in order to exhibit com- petence, identify and address risks appropriately, and perform in a manner that provides value to the organization. Strong internal auditors bring together various skills, ranging from specialized industry and technical knowl- edge to seasoned business acumen that includes advanced degrees in business administration, finance and even law. It is not uncommon for internal auditors to possess professional designations from other disciplines beyond accounting. After all, internal audit functions examine all aspects of a business entity – a key challenge in today’s complex business climate. Therefore, while not required or mandated specifically, it is considered best practice for internal auditors to possess and maintain professional certifications applicable to their focus and responsibilities. 5. Are there professional standards that govern the practice of internal auditing? Yes. The IIA promulgates the Professional Practices Framework, which consists of the following categories of guidance: the Standards and Code of Ethics, Practice Advisories, and Position Papers and Practice Guides. The first category (considered mandatory guidance) consists of core materials: • Definition of Internal Audit • Code of Ethics • International Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing 4Mandatory guidance is considered essential for the professional practice of internal auditing. Other elements of the framework are linked to these standards. The Standards and Code of Ethics comprise attribute, performance and implementation standards. Attribute and performance standards apply to all internal audit services. Implementation standards apply to specific types of engagements, such as assurance and consulting activities. (See Appendix D for a summary of The IIA Standards.) Interpretations are included as part of many standards to provide clarification as to how they should be applied in practice. While The IIA Standards do not have the rule of law, the practice of internal auditing, like other professions, is based upon elements of due professional care and a ruling body that develops standards of practice through a public exposure process. The IASB and adherence to The IIA Code of Ethics inculcate these standards into internal audit professional practices. For more information, visit www.theiia.org. 6. Are internal audit functions required to follow The IIA Standards? For CIAs, The IIA Code of Ethics requires adherence to The IIA Standards. Practice professionals usually look to the Practice Advisories for The IIA’s recommendations on matters related to situations that are not covered directly. Concepts of due professional care permeate all practice activity, and apparent violations are investigated by The IIA. 7. What are The IIA Practice Advisories? Practice Advisories (formerly referred to as Guidelines) provide additional guidance on certain topics and issues. These advisories are not mandatory. They may have a limited life or may be elevated to a Standards level based upon importance, usage and acceptance. In part, Practice Advisories help auditors interpret The IIA Standards and apply Standards to specific internal auditing situations. Although some Practice Advisories may be applicable to all internal auditors, others may be developed to meet the needs of a specific industry, a specific audit specialty or a specific geographic area, including guidance on topics such as environmental issues, control self-assessment, information technology, government auditing, and guidance issued by other standard-setting bodies and adopted by appropriate committees of The IIA. All Practice Advisories are subjected to a formal review process by The IIA’s Professional Issues Committee or other group designated by the organization’s Guidance Planning Committee. (Source: The IIA website, www.theiia.org) 8. What jurisdiction do the SEC and the PCAOB have over internal auditors? Neither of these regulatory bodies has direct jurisdiction over internal auditors at this time. The PCAOB can influence the nature and extent of internal audit work through the rules it issues about external auditors’ reliance on the work of others. For example, on May 24, 2007, the PCAOB issued Auditing Standard No. 5, An Audit of Internal Control Over Financial Reporting That Is Integrated With an Audit of Financial Statements (AS5), which described a public accountant’s reliance on the work of others, including internal auditors, during audits of internal control over financial reporting (ICFR). Currently, these regulatory bodies set requirements and monitor compliance of publicly listed U.S. companies and the public accounting profession. The internal audit profession, like the legal profession, continues to be self-regulated by a required public comment process. The IASB promulgates updated professional standards (see Question 1). Guide to Internal Audit FAQs 59. Can existing employees become internal auditors? Yes. There is no prohibition against employees of a company becoming internal auditors. A number of companies host a “guest auditor” program whereby employees are assigned to the company’s internal audit function for a short duration of time or to assist on one or more specific internal audit-related matters. When transferring existing employees into the internal audit function, companies, management, internal audit function leadership and, when appropriate, audit committees should consider the following questions: • Does the person have a positive employment record? Has the person performed at a high level in his or her current department or function? If not, why is this employee being considered for a transfer to internal audit? • Does the employee possess: – Balanced assessment abilities, integrity and trustworthiness? – Relevant operating and functional experience to be effective? – Appropriate educational background to be successful? – Objective attitude and professional skepticism? – A commitment to competency, technical proficiency, continuing education and ethics as set forth in The IIA Standards? All employees will not necessarily become, nor should they be expected to become, effective internal auditors. 10. What personal qualities, knowledge and skills should internal auditors possess? Internal auditors should possess and demonstrate through their work, actions and communication a number of traits, including, but not limited to: • A commitment to and demonstration of competence in the field of internal auditing • Strong financial and operational background in accounting, IT, regulatory compliance or the industry in which a company operates • Honesty and integrity • Strong work ethic and attention to detail In general, internal auditors should develop and maintain a healthy level of professional skepticism and objec- tivity to assist in evaluating information and making judgments. Additionally, internal audit professionals should possess exceptional verbal and written communication skills, and be proc fi ient in negotiating and reasoning with a variety of departments and groups over which internal audit may have no formal authority. Finally, personal integrity, professional due diligence and curiosity are important traits for individuals tasked with conducting internal audit work. Internal auditors also need to acquire and then master new areas of expertise and knowledge of emerging or re-emerging issues. This can be accomplished by attending internal and external training programs. Realizing the internal audit profession is continuously evolving, Protiviti has conducted a series of internal audit capabilities and needs surveys in recent years to provide benchmarks by which internal auditors can measure their knowledge and skills and identify gaps to be addressed. See Appendix J for a list of skills and knowledge used in this internal audit benchmarking study. 11. Do internal auditors have to comply with any professional ethics requirements? Yes. Like most professions, members must adhere to a code of ethics as part of following The IIA Standards. In addition, other professional certifications that practitioners may hold typically require adherence to a standard of ethics. (See Question 5 and Appendix E.) Along with the CIA designation, many internal auditors also hold CPAs, CISAs (IT auditors) or other certifications that require strict adherence to a formal code of ethics, with serious repercussions by an ethics board for violations. 6In addition to professional ethics requirements, the organization in which internal auditors are employed may have its own specific code of conduct, rules of behavior and other ethical requirements that internal auditors need to be aware of, must comply with and may at times be responsible for validating compliance with. 12. How much should a company spend on internal audit? The costs, focus and size of an internal audit function should be tailored to each company’s individual needs. In addition, a company’s written internal audit charter, approved by the audit committee, will impact the amount of annual internal audit investment. The amount invested should depend on the level and complexity of risks a com- pany faces, its industry profile and the responsibilities given to the internal audit function. ® This is supported by a 2007 study sponsored by Corporate Executive Board’s Audit Director Roundtable . Data from this study (shown below) indicates that internal audit budgets are correlated positively both to company size (as measured by revenue) and complexity. However, it is not a linear relationship. Revenue Range Budget as a Percentage of Company Revenue (Billions of USD) First Quartile Median Third Quartile 1B .08% .13% .19% 1B - 2B .07% .11% .19% 2B - 3B .05% .07% .10% 3B - 5B .04% .07% .09% 5B - 10B .03% .04% .06% 10B - 20B .02% .03% .06% 20B .02% .03% .05% Corporate Executive Board goes on to state in this study that, “… even within similar revenue brands, there is sig- nificant variation in internal audit budgets across industries.” Internal audit departments that operate in heavily regulated industries “must incorporate regulatory compliance into their processes, and at times, must audit at least two separate sets of books (statutory and accounting).” 2 The third edition of Moving Internal Audit Back into Balance, which reviews the results of Protiviti’s Internal Audit Rebalancing study, also supports the philosophy of matching these budgets to company risk prol fi es and internal audit responsibilities. In this study, more than half of the respondents said they expect no change in their internal audit budgets in the near future, as many of them are experiencing at least a moderate decrease in the amount of internal audit hours spent on Sarbanes-Oxley compliance. This is allowing internal audit to focus more of its time and budget on other areas of the COSO model rather than just Sarbanes-Oxley-related activities. The IIA also has identie fi d, through its annual Global Audit Information Network (GAIN) reports, a general range of internal audit expenditures from companies in many different industries and of varying sizes. These well- established practices and benchmarks tracked by The IIA provide average internal audit costs based upon revenue, although these often vary by industry. As mentioned above, these costs should be driven by the risk and complexity of the overall business environment, including potential exposures to business failure. The GAIN estimations provide a general guideline for internal audit expenditures. Keep in mind that these estimates represent average internal audit costs of in-house resources. Depending on the strategy, risks and scope of the internal audit work, it is not uncommon for costs to fluctuate based upon significant events or changes that expose an organization to additional risks. For more information on the GAIN benchmarks as they relate to internal audit spend, please visit www.theiia.org/research/benchmarking/. 2 For more information, see Protiviti’s Moving Internal Audit Back into Balance: Guide to Internal Audit FAQs 7 A Post-Sarbanes-Oxley Survey, available at www.protiviti.com.13. Are there industry groups for internal auditors? Yes, there are a number of internal audit groups that have been formed based upon industry affiliation. Their size and degree of formality vary widely. Industries that have formal internal audit organizations include, but are not limited to: • Banking • Utilities • Media • Governmental entities • Gaming• Insurance • Pharmaceuticals • Construction • Healthcare• Hospitality • Colleges and universities • Hospitals • High technology• Manufacturing • Consumer products • Commercial airlines • Energy We recommend that internal auditors seek out these organizations within their industries and become active participants in them. (See Appendix F for a list of other organizations.) 14. Isn’t internal auditing a duplication of what external auditors do? No, not at all. External auditors are hired by and report to a company’s audit committee. Their historical objective has been to express an opinion on the fair presentation of the company’s financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). Their audit is completed in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards (GAAS) that were originally established by The American Institute of Certified Public Accoun - tants (AICPA) and are now the responsibility of, and are being updated by, the PCAOB. For public companies and certain other qualifying organizations, external auditors must provide an opinion on a company’s ICFR, following AS5, which is now required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. An easy-to-remember distinction might be that the external auditor is responsible for attesting to accounting reports issued to outside parties and investors, including reporting on ICFR, while an internal auditor is responsible for reviewing inside business practices and internal accounting and process controls. As noted in Question 1, internal audit is defined by The IIA as an independent, objective assurance and consult - ing activity designed to add value and improve an organization’s operations. Internal auditors may be hired by and report to both management and the audit committee. Internal auditors assist management and the audit committee in identifying and evaluating key business risks, completing focused audits in high-risk areas, complet- ing special investigations for the board and management and, at times, assisting external auditors with parts of their work on the company’s financial statements. The scope of internal audit work is determined by the audit committee, management and the internal audit function itself. The standards internal auditors should follow in planning, executing and communicating the results of their work are The IIA Standards. However, both internal and external auditors should collaborate to minimize duplication of effort. Internal and external auditors work in tandem to help management and the audit committee ensure that a company’s financial reports and other information are accurate and that its system of internal control is effective (see Question 40). External auditors may consider and use the work of internal auditors in connection with their integrated audit of the financial statements of a company. Currently, the authoritative literature on this relationship is the AICPA Statement of Auditing Standard 65 (SAS 65). In addition, the external auditor may also use the work of internal auditors in many circumstances in connection with an audit of ICFR, as noted by the PCAOB in Paragraphs 15–19 of AS5. (See Questions 47 and 53.) 815. How is “independence” defined differently for internal auditors and external auditors? The term “independent” and the concept of independence are often referred to in connection with both internal and external auditors. However, there is a considerably different meaning, degree and context regarding indepen- dence for each. For internal auditors, independence refers to an attitude that is free from bias or undue influence. It also embodies the reporting structure of an internal audit function, which includes reporting to the audit committee and the CEO, in order to allow for an appropriate level of organizational freedom and a lack of restriction in their work and access to records. There are no SEC regulations covering or requiring the independence of internal auditors. Additionally, internal auditors can be employees of the company they serve, whereas external auditors, of course, cannot be. While The IIA Standards use the word “independence” to describe internal auditors in certain places, “objectivity” might be a better word to describe one of the primary characteristics that internal auditors need to exhibit. In fact, that is the word the PCAOB uses when describing the external auditor’s evaluation of factors supporting the extent of reliance. SAS 65 further supports this view and point of differentiation when it explains that, although internal auditors are not independent from the entity, The IIA Standards den fi e internal audit as “an independent, objective and consultative activity designed to add value and improve an organization’s operations.” SAS 65 further states that this concept of “independence” is different from the independence the external auditor must maintain under the AICPA Code of Professional Conduct and SEC regulations. The standard describes how internal auditors maintain “objectivity” with respect to the activity being audited. To further underscore this distinction, the AICPA clarie fi d in SAS 65 that the internal audit function is part of the entity’s control environment. The PCAOB has reinforced this point of view. For external auditors, however, independence is a much more structured and defined term, as well as a regulatory requirement for performance. External auditors are required to be independent under various SEC and AICPA professional standards. Requirements concerning external auditor independence include: • Strict adherence to reporting directly and solely to the audit committee, including having the audit com- mittee responsible for approving the external audit fees and, in some cases, pre-approving certain types of services to further ensure independence of the external auditor • Prohibitions on the nature and extent of services that can be provided to an audit client, such as internal audit outsourcing, valuation services, bookkeeping, design of financial systems and other specifically listed services that the SEC has determined would undermine the independence of the external auditor • Adhering to independence requirements in both appearance and fact • Not being an advocate for an audit client or having a mutuality of or conflicting interest • Scope and extent of audit work must be determined by the auditor alone • Not taking on any responsibilities that could be construed to be those of a management function, and not being in a position of auditing the external auditor’s own work • No direct equity ownership in an audit client • Required rotation of certain personnel on audit engagements • Prohibitions on audit firm personnel at certain levels being hired by the companies they audit for a period of time after they cease to provide services to those companies Also, under GAAS, external auditors are required to confirm their independence in writing to the audit committee of the companies they audit. Penalties can be levied against external auditors by the SEC and AICPA for violations of independence rules. The SEC also can require the financial statements to be re-audited for any period for which it determines that an audit r fi m was not independent while performing an audit of those statements. Guide to Internal Audit FAQs 916. What role and responsibility do internal auditors have for fraud? The IIA Standard 1210.A2 regarding assurance engagements in internal auditor’s work with respect to fraud states: Internal auditors must have sufficient knowledge to evaluate the risk of fraud and the manner in which it is managed by the organization, but are not expected to have the expertise of a person whose primary respon- sibility is detecting and investigating fraud. The related Practice Advisory 1210.A2-1 goes on to state: Internal auditors are responsible for assisting companies to prevent fraud by examining and evaluating the adequacy and effectiveness of their internal controls’ system, commensurate with the extent of a potential exposure within the organization. When meeting their responsibilities, internal auditors should consider the following elements: 1. Control environment. Assess aspects of the control environment, conduct proactive fraud audits and investigations, communicate results of fraud audits and provide support for remediation efforts. In some cases, internal auditors also may own the whistleblower hotline. 2. Fraud risk assessment. Evaluate management’s fraud risk assessment, in particular, their processes for identifying, assessing, and testing potential fraud and misconduct schemes and scenarios, including those that could involve suppliers, contractors, and other parties. 3. Control activities. Assess the design and operating effectiveness of fraud-related controls; ensure that audit plans and programs address residual risk and incorporate fraud audits; evaluate the design of facilities from a fraud or theft perspective; and review proposed changes to laws, regulations, or systems, and their impacts on controls. 4. Information and communication. Assess the operating effectiveness of information and communication systems and practices, as well as provide support to fraud-related training initiatives. 5. Monitoring. Assess monitoring activities and related computer software; conduct investigations; support the audit committee’s oversight related to control and fraud matters; support the development of fraud indica- tors; and hire and train employees so they can have the appropriate fraud audit or investigative experience. It also seems clear from The IIA’s definition of internal auditing (see Question 1) that internal audit should play a role in assisting management and the audit committee with fraud-related issues, including the prevention, detec- tion and investigation of fraud as part of “bringing a systematic, disciplined approach to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of risk management, control and governance processes.” Statement on Auditing Standards No. 99, Consideration of Fraud in a Financial Statement Audit (SAS 99), updat- ed by the AICPA in July 2007 and effective for audits of financial statements for periods beginning on or after December 15, 2002, is the current standard for external auditors concerning fraud. As part of this standard, “the auditor should evaluate whether entity programs and controls that address identie fi d risks of material misstatement due to fraud have been suitably designed and placed in operation.” Though this standard provides guidance for external auditors in connection with their audits of company financial statements, it also suggests that a company and its management should be involved in or complete the following activities related to fraud: • Determine key fraud risks at the company. • Identify programs and controls to prevent and detect fraud, including an appropriate “tone at the top.” • Determine the effectiveness of such programs and controls to detect and prevent fraud. • Investigate and resolve any reported instances of fraud. Internal auditors, given their objectivity and role within the organization, can be of substantial assistance to management and the audit committee in meeting their responsibilities under SAS 99 and in matters related to fraud in general. 10Additionally, Section 302 of Sarbanes-Oxley requires management to report to the external auditor and the audit committee, at least quarterly, “any fraud, whether material or not, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in internal control.” Again, internal audit logically can play a role in assisting manage - ment with investigating such reported instances, some of which may be detected and reported by internal audit. More importantly, internal audit can assist management and the audit committee in implementing processes and controls to prevent fraud in the form of education and orientation programs, enhanced internal controls and more robust fraud monitoring systems. Companies and their internal auditors may want to access Management Antifraud Programs and Controls, a publica- tion jointly developed and issued by The IIA, the Association of Certie fi d Fraud Examiners, Financial Executives International, the AICPA and others. AS5, in Paragraphs 11, 14 and 15, clearly identifies fraud considerations as an integral part of a company’s ICFR. The PCAOB makes it clear that part of management’s responsibility when designing a company’s ICFR is to design and implement programs and controls to prevent, deter and detect fraud. In this regard, internal audit can be a qualified and logical source to assist management and the audit committee. 17. Are there university programs in internal auditing? Yes. In fact, the number of formal collegiate internal audit programs is increasing. The IIA’s Academic Relations Committee encourages and supports the implementation of internal audit curricula at the collegiate and graduate level worldwide. The IIA endorses programs that meet high-quality standards including faculty, student and program expectations. A few of the pioneer and well-known programs include: • Louisiana State University – www.bus.lsu.edu/centers/cia/ • Northern Illinois University – www.cob.niu.edu/ • University of Texas - Dallas – http://som.utdallas.edu/iaep/index.htm • University of Texas - Austin – www.mccombs.utexas.edu/mpa/ • Universiteit van Amsterdam – www.abs.uva.nl/emia/home.cfm More than 35 colleges and universities offer programs, concentrations and certificates as part of business degrees, including a doctorate dissertation scholarship program for internal audit studies. See Appendix G for a complete listing. 18. What is the Common Body of Knowledge? The Common Body of Knowledge (CBOK) 2006 study is the largest project ever undertaken by The IIA Research Foundation. Chief audit executives (CAEs), internal audit practitioners of all levels of experience, and IIA Chapter and Institute leaders were surveyed for CBOK, which targeted the following topics: • Compliance to and adequacy of The IIA Standards • Current status of the internal audit activity within organizations • Activities and types of audits being performed • Tools and techniques used by internal auditors • Skills and knowledge possessed by internal auditors The IIA plans to repeat the CBOK study every three years, with the next study scheduled for 2009. The result will be a continuously expanding library of information about the internal audit profession worldwide. By examining how internal auditors are executing their work, CBOK will help The IIA to shape the future of the profession. For further information on CBOK, please visit www.theiia.org. Guide to Internal Audit FAQs 11Starting an Internal Audit Function 19. How do we start an internal audit function? A suggested set of guidelines for starting an internal audit function includes: • Clarify expectations with senior management, the board and audit committee, including required listing standards for NYSE companies. Non-NYSE-listed organizations should consider voluntary compliance. • Develop an audit charter, with audit committee input and approval. • Consider the appropriate budget and staffing model (e.g., in-house, co-sourced or outsourced). As part of this process, research actions taken by similar companies in your industry. • Formulate reporting responsibilities of the internal audit function. • Identify the “universe” of auditable entities within the organization. • Complete an initial risk assessment with company management and audit committee involvement. Consider using recognized approaches and frameworks for this effort, such as the COSO internal control and COSO enterprise risk management (ERM) frameworks. Other recognized and acceptable frameworks include the King Report on Corporate Governance for South Africa - 2002 (King II Report) and the Turnbull Report in the United Kingdom. • Consider the results of the work required to comply with Sarbanes-Oxley when conducting the risk assessment. • Develop an internal audit plan responsive to the risk assessment. • Determine staffing requirements and whether the department will be staffed internally, co-sourced or outsourced. • Plan and execute audit work called for in the audit plan, including a system to monitor and follow up on audit recommendations. • Update the risk assessment for changing circumstances during the year. • Continuously enhance and modify the internal audit function to meet changing needs of management and the audit committee. See Appendix C for a listing of 16 steps developed by The IIA for creating an internal audit function. 1220. How should an internal audit function be staffed? Internal audit functions must be resourced adequately to ensure an effective evaluation and testing of internal controls, associated risks and execution of the internal audit plan and other activities as outlined in the company’s written internal audit charter. The annual audit plan is based upon a risk assessment at both the entity and process levels, and should be approved by the audit committee and board. Companies should look to their individual risk profiles to drive staffing decisions. A business facing a significant number of risks or particularly complex risks will require a broader range of specialists and expertise. Most internal audit departments are headed by a CAE and include layers of staff such as managers, senior auditors and auditors. Many companies also rely on other in-house professionals or tap into the specialized skill sets of outside providers. Some of the more commonly accessed or desired specialized skills needed by today’s internal audit function include: • Relevant industry knowledge • IT privacy and security • Current, in-use enterprise resource planning (ERP) application expertise • Business continuity management • Specialized and complex industry or other related regulations • Fraud prevention, detective and investigative capability • United States GAAP and IFRS knowledge • Specific business process knowledge in large, material and high-risk areas • Resources needed in remote locations 21. To whom should the head of internal audit report? The reporting line of internal audit is a dynamic issue today, especially considering recent corporate scandals and continued financial restatements, the emergence of regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley and new listing stan - dards of the stock exchanges. All these have substantially increased the responsibilities of the audit committee. The IIA Practice Advisory 1110-2, Chief Audit Executive (CAE) Reporting Lines, states, “The chief audit executive should report to a level within the organization that allows the internal audit activity to accomplish its responsi- bilities.” The Practice Advisory goes on to state: “The Institute (IIA) believes strongly that to achieve necessary independence, the CAE should report functionally to the audit committee or its equivalent. For administrative purposes, in most circumstances, the CAE should report directly to the chief executive (CEO) of the organization.” Unlike the company’s external audit firm, which by regulation must be hired by, report to and be compensated by the audit committee, internal audit has a broader role to play through serving as a resource for both the audit committee and company management. Though this “dual reporting” is a somewhat sensitive arrangement and can be tricky in practice, it nevertheless provides important benefits to the company as a whole, including its overall corporate governance objectives as well as management’s objectives for reliable financial reporting, compliance with applicable laws and regulations, and efficiency and effectiveness of operations (the COSO objectives of internal control). Until regulations or standards change, internal audit is considered a part of the internal control system of a com- pany, yet must also remain an independent, objective assurance and consulting activity that supports and reports to a company’s CEO and audit committee. Guide to Internal Audit FAQs 1322. Can employees in the company participate in internal audits? Yes. Many companies choose to source management-training programs, employees with specific experience or guest internal auditor programs as part of resource planning. Some organizations have established two- to four- year rotation programs to help management understand the organization’s internal control environment and other operational areas, and to provide individuals with management-training experience and career progression. This type of flexibility and training often enhances organizational understanding of risk management and internal controls systems and motivates program candidates to strive for excellence. Conversely, internal audit management should be aware, in every instance, of the same conflicts of interest that arise naturally from such relationships in considering these candidates for potential positions in operations. For example, there may be a conflict of interest for individuals who join the internal audit department from an existing corporate function that would preclude them from auditing their former colleagues. Other situations include a natural tendency by a rotating internal auditor to hold a favorable bias in evaluating a business unit or function in which he or she may be seeking a full-time position. 23. What are the pros and cons of outsourcing/co-sourcing internal audit? Up through the 1980s, most company internal audit functions were staffed primarily in-house with full-time, dedicated employees. This structure worked adequately and can still be effective today, but only if full-time internal auditors possess all of the skills needed to address key business risks faced by the organization. If this is not the case, then the internal audit function places its employer company at risk by not being able to address adequately the key risks that it has been asked to audit. During the 1980s, as the concept of “core competency” gained more attention, companies evaluated many of their business functions and the potential for outsourcing them. Payroll, benefits, real estate, printing, informa - tion systems operation and maintenance, and even aspects of design or manufacturing, among other functions, were considered. Many companies found clear and tangible benefits, positive return on investment (ROI), and improved service levels as a result of outsourcing. In some cases, capital expenditures were reduced and the cost of these functions became more variable. Internal audit functions were a part of this analysis, and several new internal audit outsourcing and co-sourcing organizations, including the large accounting firms, created new structures to provide such services. Today, all businesses, government and not-for-profit organizations face myriad risks due to the dynamic operat - ing climates in which they operate. New and fast-changing regulations; significant technology-related risks such as security, business continuity, and application and data integrity; heightened instances of or opportunities for fraud and abuse; and other issues such as Sarbanes-Oxley require internal audit functions to have at their disposal a larger and deeper talent pool. These professionals must be able to address, react to and effectively audit and report on this more complex and faster-changing risk universe. Given this dynamic risk environment, it is unlikely that a majority of internal audit functions have the continu- ous in-house capability to adequately address every risk they and their organizations must face. Thus, contracting, partnering or working with outside organizations that can provide specialized resources improves an internal audit function’s ability to address risks and meet customer expectations. Additionally, these co-sourcing arrangements often assist in the knowledge transfer process to in-house resources, raising the level of competency of the func- tion’s full-time employees. Likewise, many companies – especially public companies, large and diverse private companies, and even govern- mental entities and not-for-profit organizations – may find that full or partial outsourcing of their internal audit functions makes sense, is cost-effective and provides significant short- and long-term benefits. 14Benefits of outsourcing include: • Quick start-up of the function and execution of work, including already-developed methodologies and audit tools provided by the outsourcing organization • A variable-cost arrangement rather than a fixed-cost function • Access to a greater number and wider range of resources • Potentially greater objectivity and independence The NYSE’s internal audit rule allows for the outsourcing of internal audit. In its commentary to the requirement, the NYSE stated, “A company may choose to outsource this function to a third-party service provider other than its independent auditor.” Companies should also consider the potential negative impact of outsourcing or co-sourcing internal audit, which can include, but is not limited to, the potential loss of control since resources are not directly employed by the company. From The IIA’s perspective, internal auditing, regardless of who provides the service, should be performed in accordance with The IIA Standards. The IIA states in its position paper, Resourcing Alternatives for the Internal Audit Function, that a fully resourced and professionally competent staff is an integral part of the organization, whether insourced or outsourced. The IIA recognizes that many “partnering” arrangements with outside providers have been effective in helping organizations obtain internal auditing services to help achieve management’s objectives. While non-NYSE companies are not required to have an internal audit function, certain limitations apply to the nature and level of internal audit services that any public company’s external auditor can provide per SEC rules and regulations. Ultimately, deciding whether to outsource internal audit is not a matter of considering the general pros and cons. Instead, each company should ask: • If we currently do not have an internal audit function, are we better off taking the time and effort to start our own in-house internal audit function? Or should we initially outsource it to gain quick start-up and access to a greater level of expertise and broader level of resources, and then monitor this decision and delivery model to ensure it is effective? • If we already have an internal audit function, do we have the resources we need to effectively address all of the key risks we face and in which internal audit should be involved? Do we need to have all of these resources in-house all of the time? Might we be better off considering an arrangement to have one or more outside organizations assist us with addressing our risks? There are many excellent internal audit functions consisting of primarily in-house, fully dedicated employee resources. What makes these functions most valuable, effective and appropriate, however, is a recognition of their own limitations. Many large internal audit functions (more than 25 full-time employees) recognize that in today’s complex business environment, it would be cost-prohibitive to have all of the right resources at hand all of the time. They also understand that various forms of co-sourcing arrangements have benefited them greatly along with the companies, management and audit committees they serve. Guide to Internal Audit FAQs 15