How to achieve success in workplace

success in the workplace depends on and workplace diversity success stories how to measure success in the workplace
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GargyOrga,France,Teacher
Published Date:16-07-2017
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career development manitoba A Guide to Succe SS in the Workplacetable of Contents Acknowledgements ............................................................................................................................. 2 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 3 About t his Guide .......................................................................................................................... 3 1. Succeeding in the Workplace ......................................................................................................... 5 Now t hat i Have the Job, What do i Need to Know to Succeed? .............................................. 5 Starting a New Job ................................................................................................................... 5 What Are the Qualities of Successful employee?......................................................................... 6 employability Skills ................................................................................................................... 6 Attitudes ................................................................................................................................... 8 essential Skills ........................................................................................................................... 8 Managing Conflict .................................................................................................................... 9 Corporate Culture: What is it and Why does it Matter? .............................................................. 9 Workplace examples – Real World experiences ........................................................................ 12 2. Workplace Tips .............................................................................................................................. 15 3. Managing My Career ..................................................................................................................... 16 What is Continuous Learning and Why is it important? ............................................................. 19 developing a Personal Learning Plan ..................................................................................... 20 Mentoring – Finding or Becoming a Mentor .......................................................................... 23 defining Success ..................................................................................................................... 23 4. Performance Reviews .................................................................................................................... 27 What do i need to know? ........................................................................................................... 27 Who Conducts Performance Reviews? ....................................................................................... 27 t ips to Prepare for a Performance Review ................................................................................. 27 Receiving and Giving Feedback ................................................................................................. 32 What if i Work Somewhere Without a Formal Performance Review Process? ........................... 32 Negotiation t ips ......................................................................................................................... 33 5. Work-Life Balance .......................................................................................................................... 34 t he Cost of ignoring Work-Life Balance ..................................................................................... 34 t he Balance Wheel ..................................................................................................................... 35 t ips for Managing or Restoring Balance .................................................................................... 38 Summary ............................................................................................................................................. 41 Appendix A: What’s Working? What’s Not? .................................................................................... 42 Appendix B: Guide Links ................................................................................................................... 43 ap Ge 1 A Guide TO S u CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACeAcknowledgements This resource package was developed through a partnership involving Manitoba Entrepreneurship, Training and Trade and Life Strategies Ltd. Project funding was provided by: Manitoba Children and Youth Opportunities Manitoba Entrepreneurship, Training and Trade Manitoba Immigration and Multiculturalism ap Ge 2 A Guide TO Su CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACeintroduction About t his Guide Whether it’s your first day on the job or your 10th year on the job, the tips and activities in this guide will help you to reach your full potential at work. You’ve likely put in lots of time and effort in school, training, learning on-the-job and your job search. if you’re just starting out, you might be worried about how to keep your job. if you’ve been working for a while, you might be more interested in learning how to advance at work. Regardless of your work situation, this guide can help you. t his guide is full of information, tips, tools and stories to help you be successful at work. if you are having difficulty with any part of the guide, another helpful resource is your local employment Manitoba Centre. to find one near you call: 1-866-332-5077 or go to www.gov.mb.ca/employment/emp_centre_locations.html. ap Ge 3 A Guide TO S u CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACeSeveral symbols are used in this guide to help highlight key points, suggestions, cautions, tips and examples. indicates an example exAMPLe outlines items to remember ReMeMBeR introduces an activity to complete ACtivit Y indicates things to avoid Avoid ap Ge 4 A Guide TO Su CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACe Succeeding in the Workplace Now That I Have the Job, What Do I Need to Know to Succeed? This guide will provide you with tips and information to maximize your success at work. Starting a New Job The first days of any new job can be tough, as you wonder how to fit in and learn your new duties. You want to show your employer they hired the right person. To do this, you’ll need to: • W ork har d – show inter est, take initiative and commit to doing the work • W ork smart – listen, ask questions and work safely • Believe in yourself – have confidence in your skills and abilities Y ou wer e of fer ed the job for a r eason – now it’ s time to show your stuf f Be Punctual/Arrive Early – It’ s important to arrive at work early . If your start time is 8:30 a.m., you’r e expected to be working by then. Depending on where you work, you might have to change your clothes, power up a computer, or do some other preparation before you’re ready to work. All of these activities should be completed by the time your workday begins (ex: 8:30 a.m.). It is helpful to arrive 10 - 15 minutes befor e your actual start time. New Hire Orientation – Lots of companies of fer an orientation session to new employees. This orientation usually covers things like: • company overview (ex: what they do, mission, vision) • company policies (ex: attendance, business practices, working hours) • benefits (ex: healthcar e, employee r ewar ds/r ecognition) Some companies may not have a formal orientation for new employees. In this case, you may need to find other ways to learn about the company: • r eview the company’ s website • talk to your supervisor or human r esour ces staf f about company policies • meet with your supervisor to r eview your job description and expectations • find an experienced staf f member to help guide you at work Make sur e that you listen, ask questions and try to make a good impr ession. Y ou want your new employer to feel good about the decision to hire you. Take Initiative – T aking initiative means doing what’ s needed without being asked. It’ s a good idea to make a list of tasks that you can do when you have some downtime in your job. Depending on what you do, this type of list might be found in your job description. For example, if you work in a retail store, there are tasks like restocking or tidying to do when you’re not busy. Regardless of the type of work that you do, it’s a good idea to ask your supervisor what he or she would like you to do when you’re not busy with your regular tasks. PAGE 5 A Guide TO S u CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACeLearn Policies and Procedures – Learn workplace policies and procedures as quickly as you can. This will help make your transition to a new workplace easier. It’ll also help you to achieve success at work as you quickly become an asset to your employer. Be Willing to Learn – A new job is full of opportunities for learning. Even if it’s a job that you’ve done before, a new employer may have different ways of doing things. It’s important to be willing to learn new things as well as new ways of doing things that you have done before. Be Respectful – It’s important to respect your employer and new co-workers. This includes simple things like: • turning of f the ringer on your personal cell phone and only answering/making personal calls on breaks • avoiding the personal use of company email, phone, or fax • listening • being on time • doing the best job that you can do What Are the Qualities of Successful Employee? Successful employees have a combination of skills and attitudes. It is important to continue to develop your skills and show a positive attitude toward work to make a good impression. The following summarizes the qualities valued by employers: Employability Skills Employability skills are skills, attitudes and behaviours identified by employers as necessary for 1 workplace success. They are the “skills you need to enter, stay in, and progress in the world of work” and include: • Communication o the ability to communicate well with others o understanding how cultural differences affect communication styles • Managing information o the ability to gather and use information • Using numbers o the ability to work with numbers and data • Thinking and pr oblem solving, which includes the ability to: o look at different points of view o develop and try out solutions • Demonstrating positive attitudes and behaviours o having confidence o taking care of yourself o being honest and open with other people • Being r esponsible o setting goals o managing your time o being accountable for your actions 1 www.jobsetc.gc.ca/toolbox/checklists/employability.jsp?lang=e PAGE 6 A Guide to S u CCe SS i N t He Wo RKPLACe • Being adaptable o being flexible o being open to feedback and change • Learning continuously o being willing to keep learning and gr owing • W orking safely • W orking with others o being able to work on a team o r especting diversity • Participating in pr ojects and tasks o working to standar ds o adapting to new information and change If you think about it, you’ve pr obably used these skills or needed to use them in every workplace you’ve been in. For more information about employability skills, visit: www.conferenceboard.ca/topics/education/learning-tools/ employability-skills.aspx RememBeR To compare your skills to the skills employers are looking for, complete the short assessment available at www.jobsetc.gc.ca/toolbox/checklists/employability.jsp?lang=e. Once you’ve done these activities, think about ways to develop skills you’re missing or need to improve. Activity PAGE 7 A Guide TO S u CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACeAttitudes t he attitude you have or approach you take will contribute to your success at work. employers have identified several essential attitudes: • have a good work ethic • believe in yourself • be a team player • have a “can-do” attitude • stay positive • look ahead and anticipate the unexpected • be willing to learn • embrace new opportunities • see the importance in every job or task 3 • be flexible and open to change it’s really important to believe in yourself and your skills. if you don’t have confidence in yourself, it will be harder for other people to be confident in you. Building your skills can help you gain confidence. You can also gain confidence by reflecting on your accomplishments. Check out A Guide to Building a Career Portfolio for help with understanding your strengths and demonstrating your skills. Essential Skills Human Resources and Skills development Canada has developed a list of essential skills for work, 4 learning and life: • r eading text • document use • numeracy • writing • oral communication • working with others • continuous learning • thinking skills • computer use Most of these skills are transferable. t his means they can be used in lots of different areas of your life and in different types of work. You may have developed skills through volunteering, playing sports, or learning. try to think about which skills might be most useful at work. Look for ways to use your skills to help you succeed. 2 Employability Skills 2000+ www.conferenceboard.ca/topics/education/learning-tools/ employability-skills.aspx 3 www.conferenceboard.ca/topics/education/learning-tools/employability-skills.aspx ap Ge 8 A Guide TO Su CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACeFor more information about essential skills, visit: • Human Resour ces and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) o www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/workplaceskills/essential_skills/ general/home.shtml • Workplace Education Manitoba (WEM) o www.wem.mb.ca/ • Essential Skills Indicator o www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/workplaceskills/essential_skills/ Remembe R general/online_indicator.shtml • Show What You Know Guide Managing Conflict Even if we don’t want it to, conflict can occur at work. You might find yourself in a conflict with another employee over work schedules or tasks. Or, you might have a personality conflict with someone you work with. Whatever the source of the conflict, what’s most important is how you manage it. Successful employees are skilled at managing conflict – their own and others To manage conflict effectively: • be respectful • be willing to listen • be willing to talk openly if there is a problem • be open to the opinions and ideas of others • be willing to work as a member of a team • be willing to seek the help of a supervisor or manager if you can’t resolve the conflict Corporate Culture: What Is It and Why Does It Matter? Corporate culture is a term often used to describe an organization’s “personality.” Just as you have unique traits and characteristics, so do organizations. An organization’s corporate culture can include: • Values o What’s important/not important • Vision o Where the company is going • Unspoken rules • What types of behaviours get rewarded If you’re starting a new job, learning the job can be tough enough on its own. To be successful, you’ll also need to learn about the culture of the organization. Some organizations talk about corporate culture in their new hire orientation sessions. If your employer doesn’t do this, you’ll need to manage your own learning. To help you learn about an organization’s corporate culture: • Ask questions; your manager or supervisor can tell you how things are done • Ask your manager to help you find an experienced employee to mentor you and help you learn about the organization • Talk to your co-workers • Make note of any new wor ds or acronyms (ex: SOPs = standard operating procedures) PAGE 9 A Guide TO S u CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACeSarah Jones: Sarah is going to apply for a job at Amy’s Boutique. Amy’s Boutique is a women’s clothing store that Sarah often shops at. Sarah did a culture review to learn more about the workplace and help her be better prepared in case she gets an interview. When Sarah went into Amy’s Boutique to pick up the application form, she paid close attention to the store environment and staff and made notes once she got home. Sarah learned that she was in a similar age range to other employees and that it looks like a good place to work. She ex AMPLe realized that she might have to buy new clothes when she’s hired and to freshen up her hairstyle. Sarah also noticed that sales are important and it looks like all employees are supposed to be focused on selling. Here’s Sarah’s worksheet. Visible “Items” (clues you observe in people, premises, publications, website) • store was really bright and modern looking • there seemed to be more customers looking around in Amy’s Boutique than in some of the other stores “Insider” Language • Sarah noticed the letters “ABC” on a sticky note behind the cash desk; she remembered from her previous retail experience that this stands for “Always Be Closing” a sale • she also heard one of the sales staff say to the other “Always remember ABC” Common Employee Traits • staff looked happy and were really friendly • the staff that were working were all women and looked like they were between 25 – 45 years old • they all appeared to be wearing the current line of clothes that the store is selling • staff looked well groomed with styled hair and subtle make-up t he Culture Review Worksheet can help you understand your organization’s corporate culture. Corporate cultures, like ethnic or regional cultures, can be complicated to understand. A culture review can help you to learn about “how things are done.” ACtivit Y ap Ge 10 A Guide TO Su CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACeVisible “Items” (clues you observe in people, premises, publications, website) “Insider” Language Common Employee Traits if you know someone who works in the organization or find someone you are comfortable with, ask: • Could you describe your company in 10 wor ds or less? • What is important in the workplace? • What ar e the company’ s priorities, mission, vision, or values? • How could I best fit into this team? ap Ge 11 A Guide TO S u CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACeWorkplace examples – Real World experiences Now that you’ve learned about the skills, attitudes, and behaviours needed to be successful at work, it’s time to test your skills. Read the following workplace scenarios and choose the best response. ACtivit Y Darel McDonald: Scenario One: Balancing the darel, age 39, is a general labourer who has worked at several different jobs. He has a wife and three children to support. desire to “fit in” with co-workers it’s darel’s first week on the job and a couple of his co-workers invite and employer him to walk to a local fast food restaurant for lunch. t he line up at the expectations restaurant was long and when they sat down to eat they only had 25 minutes left before they had to be back at work. darel was feeling a bit worried about the time, knowing that it would take them almost 15 minutes to get back to work. He shared his worry with the others. o ne of his co-workers said “don’t worry about it. We always take a few extra minutes and no one ever says anything about it.” What should darel do? A. Continue eating and not worry about it. B. t ell his co-workers that he’s not comfortable about being late, especially during his first week, so he’ll eat quickly and then meet them back at work. C. Stay with his co-workers this time but, when he r eturns to work, ask the supervisor what the policy is for being late after lunch. t his is a tough situation. darel wants to fit in with his co-workers and he wants to please his boss. in his last job, people who took extra break time got in trouble. in this case, darel’s best action would be B. He’s better off to return to work on time because his co-workers are not the ones who hired him. He could tell them that, because he’s so new and still on probation, he thinks he should follow the rules that his boss had given him. Back at the workplace, he could watch for a good time to ask his boss how to handle something similar in the future. each workplace culture is dif fer ent; it takes time to learn what’ s acceptable and what’ s not. ap Ge 12 A Guide TO Su CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACeJennifer Meyer: Scenario Two: Jennifer Meyer, 21, is a recent college graduate. during her work Balancing social practicum, she faced a tough situation that made her feel like she had to demands and work choose between work and friends. t his is what happened… expectations Jennifer wanted to go out with friends to celebrate a friend’s birthday. She had to be at work the next day at 8:00 a.m. which meant she had to wake up by 6:00 a.m. if she went out with her friends she probably wouldn’t get home until 1:00 a.m. t his wasn’t a problem for any of her friends because they were either unemployed or worked later shifts. What were her options? A. Friends come first. Let’s party B. Call her boss and ask if she can come in late because she has a dentist appointment. C. Accept the invitation but tell her friends that she’ll have to leave early (ex: by 10:00 p.m.) so that she can get home in plenty of time to get a good night’s rest before work the next day. in this case, Jennifer had to find a balance between work demands and friendships. Jennifer wanted to celebrate with her friends but also knew that she couldn’t be tired and have a productive day at work. Jennifer considered her options and chose C. She went out to her friend’s birthday celebration, stayed for a couple of hours, and then returned home. She was able to see her friends and not be exhausted at work the next day. ap Ge 13 A Guide TO S u CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACeSusan York: Scenario Three: Susan is 52 years old and works part-time as a customer service Handling real or representative in a bank. She’s married and has two grown children who perceived conflict at are now away at university. work Susan’ s job at the bank, like most jobs, r equir es her to work as part of a team. Recently, she noticed that some of the junior staff are getting assigned better shifts than she is (ex: not having to work late shifts ending at 7:00 p.m.). Susan is feeling frustrated because she’s been working at the bank far longer than some of the people who are getting better shifts. She’s upset but isn’t sure how to handle the situation. What should she do? A. Expr ess her anger to her boss and thr eaten to quit if things don’ t change. B. Complain to her supervisor about the situation. C. Step back and try to look at the situation fr om all perspectives. Request a meeting with the scheduling clerk to ask about the change. in this case, Susan considered her options and chose C. When she met with the scheduler, she learned that the schedule had changed to accommodate the family needs of other workers. Because Susan’s children are grown and independent, the scheduling clerk thought that Susan would be more flexible about the hours that she works. t he schedule changes allowed some of the workers with young children to pick them up from daycare before it closed. After Susan understood the need for the change, she felt much better. As a result of their talk, the scheduling clerk realized that the change could have been communicated better to Susan. When you find yourself in a conflict at work, it is important to step back and try to find the source of your feelings. Complaining to the boss may be seen as “needy” behaviour; it seems like you can’ t handle situations on your own. Being frustrated about co-workers’ privileges may seem like you’re not a team player. ap Ge 14 A Guide TO Su CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACe Workplace t ips 2 t here are endless “do’s and don’ts” for workplace behaviour depending on where you work. A few basics are listed here. if you’re not sure about the expectations in your workplace, ask your supervisor. • arrive early • dress appropriately • have a positive attitude • get proper sleep • ask questions, if you’re not sure • follow Instructions • be yourself • ask for help if needed • pay attention • show your enthusiasm • take initiative • be friendly • be willing to learn ReMeMBeR • learn the policies and procedures • have good attendance • ask for feedback • be respectful • be honest • be supportive of co-workers • stay focused on work • use work computer for work purposes ap Ge 15 A Guide TO S u CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACe Managing My Career 3 It’ s easy to think “Jim is so lucky; he always seems to get a br eak and get pr omoted to better jobs.” What you might not see is that Jim has been actively planning and managing his career. t his has allowed him to take advantage of new opportunities. You’re responsible for managing your own career. t his includes taking charge of your learning so that you keep up with changing technology or workplace practices. t ips for Career Management: • believe in yourself • be willing to learn • welcome new experiences and opportunities • set goals and follow through with action steps • develop positive relationships ReMeMBeR t his Career Management Behaviours Checklist shows many strategies that people use to manage their careers. Check (√) all that you have used within the past year. ACtivit Y ap Ge 16 A Guide TO Su CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACeWithin the past year, to manage my career, I have: Completed some self-assessments (ex: skills, interests, values, or personal style surveys) Seriously reflected on my personal values and needs as they relate to my work Compared my skills to those skills currently in demand in my field Requested feedback about my work from a supervisor Requested feedback about my work from a colleague, customer, or client Paid attention to changes within my organization that could affect my work Read about or noticed changes within my industry or profession that could affect my work Completed courses or seminars to keep my skills up-to-date Participate on a project because it would broaden my skills deliberately diversified my work experience to keep my career options open Actively searched for, or solicited, new work opportunities (internally or externally) expressed to my employer my willingness to relocate, travel, or otherwise accommodate work changes Shared my career accomplishments with colleagues and professional acquaintances Networked with others in my field by attending meetings, conferences, or other events informed supervisors or managers of my interest in taking on new challenges at work Managed my money so that i could handle a period of unemployment between jobs Made financial plans that are flexible enough to allow me to pursue interesting career oppor- tunities as they arise Made changes to better balance my work role with my other life roles Maintained a level of health and fitness that allows me to work ef fectively Set some specific career goals implemented an action plan to achieve my career goals – learning plan ap Ge 17 A Guide TO S u CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACeAfter reflecting on your career behaviours, think about what you could do differently. u se the space provided to identify specific actions you could take to manage your career. ACtivit Y if you need more information or help setting goals, check out A Guide to Planning Your Career or visit: www .manitoba.ca/car eerplanning exAMPLe ap Ge 18 A Guide TO Su CCe SS i N THe WORKPLACe

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