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MIT Career Services Table of Contents Visit us in E17-294. Location and Map ............................................................... 4 Staff Members .................................................................. 5 More info on page 4. Letter from the Executive Director: Melanie Parker................................... 6 Introduction to Global Education & Career Development .............................. 7 1. Career Development Process Career Development Pyramid ..................................................... 8 Self-Assessment: Your Interests, Values and Skills .................................. 9 The MIT Career Development Handbook is published Career Development Timelines................................................... 11 once a year, in September, by Global Education & Exploring Your Options .......................................................... 13 Career Development at the Massachusetts Institute of Focusing: Job Search Strategies ................................................. 13 Technology. Job Search Action Plan ......................................................... 14 2. Internships, Jobs and Networking Internships: Getting Experience .................................................. 16 Community Service/Volunteering................................................. 17 Jobs ........................................................................ 18 CareerBridge .................................................................. 18 Career Fairs ................................................................... 19 Global Jobs, Internships and Careers ............................................. 19 Networking.................................................................... 20 Informational Interviewing ...................................................... 21 Company Presentations ......................................................... 21 Alumni Resources .............................................................. 22 Social Media .................................................................. 22 Professional Associations ....................................................... 22 Follow GECD 3. Resume and Career Writing Resume Guidelines ............................................................. 23 Action Verbs................................................................... 25 Writing About Your Skills — PAR Statements....................................... 26 MITCareers Sample Resumes............................................................... 28 CV Guidelines.................................................................. 48 Differences Between a CV and Resume ........................................... 48 MITGlobal Sample CVs ................................................................... 49 Cover Letters .................................................................. 54 Sample Cover Letters ........................................................... 55 Other Career Writing............................................................ 61 4. Interviewing MITGlobal Preparing for an Interview ....................................................... 63 What Happens During the Interview? ............................................. 63 Sample Questions Asked by Employers............................................ 65 Behavioral Interviews and Sample Questions ...................................... 66 Sample Questions to Ask an Interviewer........................................... 67 MIT Careers (GECD) Telephone Interviews........................................................... 68 Case Interviews................................................................ 69 Site Visit Interviews ............................................................ 70 Dress Code and Etiquette for Interviews ........................................... 71 Negotiating Salary and Benefits .................................................. 72 The Art of Negotiating........................................................... 72 Internship & Job Search Etiquette ................................................ 74 5. Academic Pathways Choice of Major ................................................................ 75 Global Education ............................................................... 75 Global Education Opportunities .................................................. 76 Study Abroad Opportunities ..................................................... 76 Distinguished Fellowships ....................................................... 77 Graduate School Advising ....................................................... 77 Prehealth Advising ............................................................. 79 Prehealth Timeline Overview .................................................... 79 Academic Careers ............................................................. 80 Sample Statement of Research Interests .......................................... 81 Sample Statement of Teaching Philosophy and Interests ............................ 82 2016-17 Employer Connection Program ............................................ 83 Advertiser Index ............................................................... 84 Where is GECD? Visit us in E17-294. Global Education & Career Development Prehealth Advising Bldg E17-294 Phone: (617) 715-5328, Fax: (617) 253-8457 Mail Address: 77 Mass Ave., Bldg E17-294 gecd.mit.edu/med-school Cambridge, MA 02139 Email: prehealthmit.edu Hours: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm, Mon. - Fri. Global Education Career Services Phone: (617) 253-0676, Fax: (617) 452-2101 Phone: (617) 715-5329, Fax: (617) 253-8457 gecd.mit.edu/go-abroad gecd.mit.edu Emails: Email: gecdmit.edu studyabroadmit.edu scholarshipsmit.edu 4 MIT Global Education & Career DevelopmentIntroduction to Global Education & Career Development Staff Executive Director Career Services Prehealth Advising Michael Ahern, Employer Relations Melanie Parker Aleshia Carlsen-Bryan, Senior Coordinator Assistant Director, Prehealth Alessandra Rober Christensen, Evaluation Senior Assistant Director, Administrative Akunna Rosser, Assistant Director Employer Relations Director, Todd Jamieson, IT Support and Data Debra Shafran, Program Assistant Corporate Partnerships Associate Robert Dolan, Assistant Director of Meaghan Shea, Prehealth Advisor Susan Paxson, Receptionist Postdoctoral Scholars Nyasha Toyloy, Events Assistant Tyrene Jones, Career Development Specialist Global Education Jake Livengood, Senior Assistant Kimberly Benard, Assistant Director, Communications Director, Graduate Student Career Distinguished Fellowships Services Julia Mongo, Staff Writer and Advisor Malgorzata Hedderick, Associate Deborah Liverman, Director, Career Scott Murray, Digital Communications Dean Services Specialist, Career Advisor Julie Maddox, Assistant Dean Tamara Menghi, Associate Director, Employer Relations & Career Dwynette Smith, Program Assistant Programs Sara Stratton, Global Education Meredith Pepin, Assistant Director for Advisor First Year Engagement Libby Reed, Career Development Specialist Jordan Siegel, Recruiting and Marketing Coordinator Marilyn Wilson, Associate Director, Career Counseling & Education Lily Zhang, Assistant Director, Career Counseling and Training gecd.mit.edu 5Introduction to Global Education & Career Development We guide all students as they explore and prepare for global opportunities, health professions and careers. MISSION STATEMENT Global Education & Career Development empowers MIT students and alumni to achieve lifelong success through seamless access to transformative global experiences, comprehensive and holistic career services and mutually beneficial connections with employers and with graduate and professional schools. Resources and Services Welcome to GECD’s Career Development Handbook If you are an MIT student at any level — freshman, senior, masters student, doctoral student, or alum — this manual is for you. In the pages that follow, you will find information to help you shape your career while you are here at MIT, as you are launching out into the post-MIT world, and in subsequent years as your career develops and matures. Following is a brief overview of resources and services we offer. To learn more, please visit our website, gecd.mit.edu, stop by E17-294, call our front desk (617-715-5329) or email us at gecdmit.edu. Our resources include career assessment, online career research tools, employer directory, information sessions and workshops, fall and spring on-campus recruiting, counseling appointments, mock interviews, study abroad and distinguished fellowships advising, prehealth advising, career panels, study abroad and career fairs, symposia and other networking opportunities. GECD website: gecd.mit.edu — Our website contains pertinent information about our services, events and programs,and content regarding various career development topics. We hope you will seek it out as it augments the information in this Handbook. Career Services Drop-ins: During the academic year we hold Drop-in Hours daily. Please see our website for our Drop-ins schedule: gecd.mit.edu/services/appointments. Career Services Individual Appointments: Most individual appointments can now be booked online through CareerBridge, bit.ly/careerbridge. If you have questions please call us at 617-715-5329. Career Services Workshops: Throughout the academic year, Career Services presents career workshops. Many are tailored to the specific needs of undergraduates, graduate students, international students and prehealth applicants. Many of our workshops are available to read or listen to online. Some topics covered in workshops include: Self-Assessment Job and Internship Search Networking Researching Companies Resumes, Cover Letters, and CVs Negotiating Job Offers Interview Techniques Applying to Graduate School For more information about workshops please visit gecd.mit.edu gecd.mit.edu 7Chapter 1 Career Development Process Testing Your Career Fitness Career Development Pyramid Self-Knowledge 1. I know what motivates me to excel. 2. I can identify my strongest abilities and skills. 3. I have several major achievements that clarify a pattern of interests and abilities. 4. I know what I both like and dislike in work. 5. I have some ideas about what I want to do during the next two to three years. 6. I can list my major accomplishments in action terms. Knowledge of Employers 7. I know what skills I can offer employers in different occupations. 8. I can clearly explain to employers what I do well and enjoy doing. The pyramid above presents a model for how to help 9. I can specify why an employer should hire me. you make informed decisions about your future career 10. When I’m ready to find an internship or job, I will be direction, and then conduct a successful job search, able to identify and target potential employers. where “successful” refers to getting a job that is genuinely a good fit for you. Although the process is actually dynamic and there is movement back and forth among Internship or Job Search Skills/Contacts the different stages, the model suggests that a successful 11. I can conduct research on different occupations, job search encompasses four basic steps. It begins with employers, organizations and communities. Self-Assessment — knowing who you are, moves on to 12. I can write different types of effective resumes, Exploration of what’s out there in terms of interesting industries, fields and occupations, progresses to Focusing internship search letters, and thank-you notes. on specific industries, fields and companies that appeal to 13. I know how to network to develop connections in you, and then culminates in the nuts-and-bolts Job Search occupations and companies that interest me. stage—sending out resumes, interviewing, and negotiating 14. I know websites and other resources where jobs and job offers. internships of interest are posted. You might find it helpful to look through the following checklist, Testing Your Career Fitness, to see how ready Adapted from Jobtrak Job Search Tips where it was reprinted with you currently are to make some career decisions, and permission from Change Your Job, Change Your Life by Dr. Ronald L. conduct a successful job search. Krannich, 1995, Impact Publications. 8 MIT Global Education & Career Developmentlikely to be comfortable and thrive in work that is compatible Self Assessment with our own strongly held values. On the other hand, difficulties may arise when we find ourselves in conflict At the base of our model pyramid, providing the essential with a work situation because it clashes with our values. foundation for career decision making, is self-assessment, or knowing yourself. Thoughtful self-assessment streamlines Consider the following values as they relate to work. Which the remaining steps of the process, helping you to focus ones are most important to you? Least important? Which on organizations and careers compatible with your goals, are very deep and clear? Which are more ambiguous? and enabling you to market yourself knowledgeably and How do your values impact your career direction and work confidently. Three aspects that are important to consider decisions? when choosing a career are: interests, values, and skills. __ Achievement __ Inner Harmony Being able to clearly and selectively articulate these __ Advancement __ Job Security on a resume and during interviews will help employers __ Adventure __ Leadership understand how you will be a good fit for their organization. __ Balance: Work/Family __ Leisure Career Services offers several self-assessment inventories __ Challenge __ Location to help students with career decision making and career __ Competition __ Personal Growth planning. These include the Myers Briggs Type Indicator __ Contribute to Society __ Physical Activity (MBTI), Strong Interest Inventory, MyPlan, Skills Scan, __ Creativity __ Pleasure Values Cards, and StrengthsQuest. __ Expertise __ Precision __ Flexibility __ Recognition Interests __ Friendship __ Responsibility Our interest in the work we do is a key motivating factor __ Helping Others __ Stability for work. If we are interested in our work, we will find it more enjoyable, be more motivated to learn about it, __ High Salary __ Status develop relevant skills, work hard, and persist through __ Independence __ Variety difficult challenges. These factors increase our chances of success and job satisfaction. Skills What are your interests? Think broadly when you answer Skills are learned abilities — things we do well. Most this question — include work, academics, volunteer students have far more skills than they realize, since they and leisure interests. Consider subject areas as well as tend to take many of their skills for granted. Do you know activities. For example, subjects might include biology, what your skills are? Which skills do you like to use? Just architecture, and economics, while activities could be research, design, and consulting. because we can do something well doesn’t mean that we enjoy doing it. Can you communicate your skills effectively Below is a list of questions that may help you identify some to potential employers? of your interests. 1) Knowledge-based skills are acquired through 1. What do you love to do? education, training and on-the-job experience, e.g., 2. What books do you browse through in bookstores? you may be knowledgeable about quasars or Java or the plays of George Bernard Shaw. To think about 3. Which are your favorite courses? your knowledge-based skills, ask yourself what 4. If you won the lottery, to which causes/issues would you subject areas do you know a lot about? Consider give money? academic, work and vocational activities. Which do 5. If you were a reporter, what kind of stories would you you enjoy? like to write? 6. What are your favorite objects? 2) Transferable skills are actions that can be carried out 7. What sorts of information do you find most fascinating? in different knowledge areas, e.g., writing, data entry and project management. Employers especially want to 8. Who are your heroes? know what your transferable skills are. To think about 9. What did you dream of being when you were 10? your transferable skills, look at the list of action verbs on page 25. These verbs describe skills. How many do you Values have? Which do you like to use? Which would you like to Values are ideals and core beliefs that are important to us; they give meaning and purpose to what we do. We are most develop? Are there others not on the list? gecd.mit.edu 9Once you have evaluated your interests, values, and skills, how do you put all that information together? Your interests and values will likely point you to certain fields, industries, companies or job functions. Knowledge of your skills will help you determine if those industries, organizations, and job opportunities are likely to offer you work you can skillfully do or learn to do and will enjoy doing. Resources like ONET (see the shaded box below) can help you make connections between your skills, values, and interests, and occupations that draw on these. Self-assessment is a lifelong practice, one that most people will return to again and again over the course of their professional careers. As you gain work experience and your skills grow, your interests and values are likely to shift. You can return to this pyramid to help you move confidently into new areas of work and career. Additional Resources on Self-Assessment • Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and Strong Interest Inventory — Career Services offers these two popular assessment tools to help students clarify their career-related interests. Meet with a career counselor to learn more about these assessments. • Skills and Values Card Sorts — Career Services offers these card sorts to help students identify their skills and values, and to clarify which ones they wish to develop or pursue. Meet with a career counselor to learn more about these tools. • StrengthsQuest—Career Services offers this assessment to help students identify their top strengths and talents, and to think about how these can be expressed in a career. Meet with a career counselor to learn more about this assessment. • MyPlan — MyPlan offers a collection of self-assessment inventories, which you can take on your own. Access them on CareerBridge, bit.ly/careerbridge. Check the Additional Resources page for the listing. • Peter Fiske’s Self-Assessment Exercises — on CareerBridge, bit.ly/careerbridge Resource Library Graduate Student Materials Peter Fiske Booklet Putting Your Science to Work • John Holland’s Self-Directed Search online: www.self-directed-search.com • ONET — www.onetonline.org. Use the Advanced Search; from the drop down menu, select skills, interests, etc.; ONET will generate a list of related occupations with descriptions for you to explore. 10 MIT Global Education & Career Development ❑ Ask for help if you need it That is what Resident Career Development Timeline for Assistants, Freshman Advisors, Teaching Assistants, and Counselors are for Undergraduates For tips on how to manage your professional development Sophomore Year at each stage of your degree program, use the timeline Exploring … Explore occupations that interest you. below. Research and network career possibilities. Academics Freshman Year ❑ Confirm your choice of major. Explore a second major Adjusting … Get to know yourself. Explore your academic or minor if interested. and extracurricular interests and your future goals. ❑ Get involved with your advisor and your department. Schedule at least two meetings per semester with Academics your advisor. Use the time to learn about his/her field ❑ Test your interests through coursework, UROPs, and explore your interests in that field. Find out what volunteer jobs, and student activities. activities and services are offered to undergraduates ❑ Meet your professors. Learn how to build your network in your department. by taking advantage of their office hours. Get to know ❑ Electives can give you the opportunity to explore a at least one professor well every year. second major or minor as well as to develop a personal ❑ Identify four to seven career fields that interest you interest. Consider targeting your electives to make you and research how academic training supports those more versatile and employable. careers. Meet with a career counselor to discuss ❑ Explore opportunities for research, UROPs, and majors as they relate to careers. Read up on the creative projects. careers that interest you. Arrange informational ❑ If interested in studying abroad, begin to research your interviews with alumni working in those fields, options. To meet with Global Education advisors see: alum.mit.edu/benefits/CareerGuidance/ICAN. gecd.mit.edu/go-abroad. ❑ Attend the Choice of Major Fair. Freshmen are ❑ Learn about Distinguished Fellowship and Scholarship expected to pick a major in April, but you may remain opportunities available to students in various fields. “Undecided” until sophomore year. To meet with our Fellowships advisor see: gecd.mit.edu/fellowships. Career Decision Making ❑ Start a Career Log to record your thoughts on Career Decision Making academic coursework, future goals, and careers. ❑ Update your resume and post it on CareerBridge. Create a “college accomplishments” section to record ❑ Attend career and internship fairs to gather courses taken, extracurricular and volunteer activities, information on different industries and companies. honors/awards, internships, and jobs. Update your ❑ Attend workshops and programs sponsored by GECD Career Log throughout your college career. This log to build your career management skills. can be used to create a resume and will be helpful ❑ Explore opportunities to gain relevant work when you look for a summer job. experience, for example: internships, externships, ❑ Explore the services GECD offers such as career UROPs and summer jobs. workshops, resume critiques, and mock interviews. ❑ Learn how to build your network and cultivate mentors. ❑ Meet with a career counselor to help identify your Conduct informational interviews with people in fields interests, skills and values. that interest you and record notes in your Career Log. ❑ Talk to a career counselor about a summer job or Keep track of contacts internship in an area that interests you. Consider a ❑ Update your Career Log. summer UROP. ❑ Develop a resume to use both on and off campus. Extracurricular Involvement ❑ Sign up to become a registered user of CareerBridge, ❑ Attend meetings of student professional organizations. see: bit.ly/careerbridge. Get involved This will help you gain skills including teamwork and public speaking. Extracurricular Involvement ❑ Act on your interests. Take an active role in an ❑ Get involved in dorm activities, student organizations, extracurricular activity and explore new ones. or public service projects. Explore social and Consider assuming a leadership role in your dorm, academic clubs that interest you. Join at least one campus organization, or on a class project. extracurricular activity. ❑ Volunteer. gecd.mit.edu 11Junior Year Senior Year Experiencing…Get experience through internships and Transitioning…Develop skills you need to accomplish summer jobs. Prioritize your interests. Draft your job your goals and thrive in life after MIT. search or graduate school strategy. Academics Academics ❑ If you are planning to attend graduate or professional ❑ Choose electives that enhance your learning and school, gather all application forms and write a career goals. statement of purpose. ❑ If you have not yet done a UROP, seriously consider ❑ Make sure to keep up your grades. Graduate schools doing one now, to develop skills and help you explore and some employers may want to see your final areas of interest. semester grades. ❑ Explore options and desires to attend graduate or professional school. Consider one to three years of Career Decision Making work experience first to enhance learning. ❑ Visit GECD early in the fall semester to sharpen your ❑ Meet with an advisor before spring to discuss graduate job search skills and to take advantage of on-campus school admissions and testing processes. recruiting. ❑ Continue developing relationships with faculty, ❑ Talk with professionals in your field about job search graduate students, and professionals. Identify who techniques and opportunities. will serve as references for graduate school or ❑ Network with parents, friends, faculty, alumni, and employment. others. Most jobs are found through networking. ❑ Apply to Distinguished Fellowships and Scholarships if ❑ Develop a more active presence on LinkedIn. appropriate for you. See gecd.mit.edu/fellowships. Join groups, and research people in fields and organizations of interest to you. Career Decision Making ❑ Tailor your resume to each position for which you are ❑ Meet with a Career Counselor to create a job or applying and write compelling cover letters. Visit GECD graduate school search strategy. Also discuss with a and have your resume and cover letters critiqued. counselor effective ways to use web-based job and ❑ Identify three references and ask permission to use internship services. their names. ❑ Update your Career Log. Use your Career Log entries to ❑ Prepare for interviews by attending an Interview help you prioritize career choices. Workshop and doing a mock interview at GECD. ❑ Post an updated resume on CareerBridge. ❑ Read relevant periodicals and trade journals to ❑ Devote a significant amount of time to finding a understand current issues in your field. Having this summer job or internship or UROP in a field related to insight makes a huge difference during interviews. your future career goals. ❑ Analyze job offers based upon the goals and values ❑ Practice networking while getting career information that you documented in your Career Log. Visit GECD at company presentations, career fairs, career related where a Career Counselor can help you walk through events/forums, and talking to alums. Keep in touch with this decision. previous teachers and advisors. ❑ Let GECD know what you are up to for next year by ❑ Consider developing a professional profile on LinkedIn, completing the Graduating Student Survey. www.linkedin.com. Use it to keep track of—and build—your professional network. Extracurricular Involvement ❑ Arrange a mock interview at GECD to practice ❑ Think about your first year after graduation; your ideal interviewing skills. work, proximity to family and friends, lifestyle, values, ❑ Shop for business attire so you can “dress for and long-term goals. It may help to talk about these success” in interviews. things with your friends and people whose opinions you value. Extracurricular Involvement ❑ Start thinking about practical life after MIT. Project ❑ Send for career materials from professional your needs and create a realistic budget. Attend associations and consider joining one as a student seminars regarding finances, work/life balance, member. managing stress, office politics, etc. ❑ Continue to explore your values, interests, and skills ❑ Enjoy the end of your senior year and graduation. through involvement with clubs, student organizations, Congratulations and volunteer activities. 12 MIT Global Education & Career DevelopmentExploring Your Options: Focusing: Job Search Strategies Knowing What’s Out There Focus on some industries and occupations that appeal to you, and research them in greater depth. Here are some suggestions for how you can learn about the enormous range of industries and occupations available to Researching organizations that interest you helps you you. Think expansively and creatively decide which companies might offer a good fit for your occupational goals and interests. In addition, it is essential 1) Read about industries, organizations, occupations in: preparation prior to interviewing with a company. You can • Occupational Outlook Handbook: www.bls.gov/oco find general guidelines for job and company research at • ONet Online: online.onetcenter.org gecd.mit.edu/jobs/find/explore. • Career Cornerstone Center: www.careercornerstone.org • Websites, for example: What you should know about a company: www.collegegrad.com/careers/all.shtml • Size of organization (comparison to other • Newspapers and magazines companies in industry) • Trade magazines and newsletters • Number of years in business; history of organization • Career books and career websites • Geographical locations, corporate headquarters • Products and services, clientele 2) Notice the jobs around you, especially those done by family, • Background of top management friends, acquaintances and others. Ask people about: • Values, company culture • Their career path • Organizational structure, climate • How they feel about their work • Current financial condition • What tips and advice they have to offer • Annual sales growth for past five years • Competition 3) Browse the MIT Alumni Directory on: alum.mit.edu and • Reputation ICAN website: alum.mit.edu/benefits/CareerGuidance/ • Future outlook ICAN • News stories about company; any new • What are alumni from your major doing? developments, trends • From other majors? • Who are they working for? Where can you learn about companies and organizations? • Search ICAN for advisor-alums who have said they • Company websites would be happy to talk to students about their own experience and give career advice. • Annual reports: contact companies for copies • Browse Alumni Profiles describing alumni career • Trade associations: print and web materials paths: alum.mit.edu/news/alumniprofiles • News articles about companies and executives: newspapers, journals (search online) 4) Talk to business/industry people: • Online references: e.g., Career Cornerstone Center • Talk with your advisor and faculty about opportunities www.careercornerstone.org for people with your academic training • Directories: e.g., LexisNexis Company Dossier, • Attend student association events sponsored by Standard & Poor’s Corporation Records various departments • Talk to employees (network), MIT alumni directory, • Take part in career fairs LinkedIn • Conduct informational interviews with people in occupations and organizations that interest you Researching Companies Knowing which companies or organizations do the work you’re interested in is an essential part of your job search. Researching companies allows you to leverage the information you discover by using it to guide your How 2015 MIT Graduates Found Their Jobs content in your written materials (cover letters, Undergrad Masters Doctoral resumes, emails) which you will submit for oppor- Career fair 36.2% 9.8% 13.7% tunities. This information helps you prepare for Internship led to job offer 32.8% 15.4% 11.3% Networking 32.2% 30.7% 40.2% your interviews, and shows the employer you have On-campus recruiting (CareerBridge) 30.8% 26.3% 14.3% done your “homework” which strengthens your Directly applied to employer 20.5% 17.1% 37.8% Contacts acquired through MIT career services 5.7% 12.7% 0.6% overall candidacy. MIT Sponsored job listings, Employer database, INET 4.6% 5.4% 3.0% The very research skills and problem-solving meth- Externally advertised job listing (online, print) 1.4% 2.2% 12.8% Returning to or continuing employment 0.3% 10.5% ods you currently use here at MIT, can be put to use Through department (faculty, academic administrator) 23.5% to research companies or industry areas. Each MIT Professional conference 11.6% Course number has a designated librarian. Not only gecd.mit.edu 13can the MIT Librarians help with your academic research, • Research to identify the name of someone you can contact but they can also assist you in using the Company databases, - Company/organization website Articles databases, Patent databases etc., to research com- - Directories (MIT Infinite Connection; LinkedIn) panies. Using these online tools can help you generate lists - Company Annual Reports of companies to target that are specifically doing the type of - News articles — search online work, or research, that you want to do Companies, organiza- Approach the employer tions and labs can be searched by various classifications • Conduct informational interviews and network including geographic areas around the world. • Ask for names of people you might talk with in areas of the company that particularly interest you Each MIT Course area also has a library resources guide for • Send a letter of inquiry to a company even if you do not each subject or industry area. Follow this link to find your MIT know of an advertised position Libraries Subject Area Expert, and view their online guide to specific resources identified for your course/major. Traditional Job Search libraries.mit.edu/experts You can apply for advertised job vacancies by checking out the following locations. MIT Libraries hold many subscriptions to online databases • CareerBridge — “On-Campus Interviews” and “Job for your use. Access is free to these directories with your Search”: bit.ly/careerbridge MIT Certificate. • Newspapers, journals, publications • Company websites Conducting company research is a significant part of the • Internet jobsites, bulletin boards — e.g., exploration process in your job search. GECD has many www.simplyhired.com, www.indeed.com, resources that can assist you in conducting company www.Medzilla.com, a pharmaceutical industry site, and research. gecd.mit.edu/jobs/find/explore. www.ieee.org, the electrical engineering association’s website Job Search Action Plan • Listservs • Notices from MIT Department Administrators Once you have completed your self-assessment, explored • Head hunters different industries and fields, and narrowed your search to a few target industries and companies, you are ready to enter the final stage of the job search — identifying and applying for jobs. Below Record Keeping/Action Planning are some tips for how to go about finding job opportunities. Organize your job search. Find a method that works for you. Three job search methods are described: Networking, Using Use an electronic diary, ring binder, file folders, computer the Hidden Job Market, and the Traditional Job Search. reminders, database, or scheduler. Keep track of: 1) Job search ideas Networking 2) Schedule of what you need to do and when: Networking is the most effective method of finding a job. • Job application deadlines It involves talking to as many people as possible about • Networking meetings your job search. Networking is expanding your network of • Follow-up calls to make professional associates and acquaintances by connecting • Interviews scheduled to other people’s network of associates and acquaintances. • Thank-you notes to be sent out It can be part of a traditional job search as well as searches 3) Records of all contacts made and networking leads: using the hidden job market. When networking, you must • Name • Notes about gather information and seek advice about professions, • Dates of all actions conversations fields, occupations, trends, skills and expertise required. • Contact information • Additional contacts Get referrals to others who may expedite your job search. • Referred by whom offered Networking is a two-way street. Offer to help the people who • Phone calls, emails, • Dates when you plan are helping you— become an active part of their network. letters to follow up 4) Industries and companies of interest and your Hidden Job Market research findings Many positions are never advertised so how can you find 5) Advertised jobs, relevant research, records of all out about them? related actions 6) Jobs applied for: Target employers that interest you and identify someone • Research on the organization who works for each, talk to him/her about the company, • Dates of all actions, contact information your interests and jobs. • Notes on all conversations, email correspondence • Do any MIT alumni/ae work for the company? • Copy of cover letters, resumes sent • Talk to people in your network — does anyone know • Results anyone who works for the company? 7) Reflections, lessons learned, suggestions for future 14 MIT Global Education & Career DevelopmentDepartment of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute Genomics of Metabolic, Cardiovascular and Inflammatory Disease Branch Genetic Epidemiologist or Computational Biologist: Postdoctoral and Research Fellow training positions are currently available in Dr. Gary H. Gibbons’ research program in the Genomics of Metabolic, Cardiovascular and Inflammatory Disease Branch of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). The successful candidate will join Dr. Gibbons’ multi-disciplinary research team composed research fellows, staff and students with a range of expertise including: genetics, epidemiology, health disparities research, bioinformatics, systems biology, clinical science, computational biology and molecular medicine. Dr. Gibbons’ research program is particularly interested in elucidating the systems biology, bio-social interactions and molecular networks that mediate the predisposition of individuals of African ancestry to cardio-metabolic disorders and cardiovascular complications (hypertension, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and stroke). The conceptual framework of the program seeks to integrate a multi-level approach that incorporates both systems biology and a socio-ecologic model in understanding the multi-dimensional determinants of ancestry-related differences in health and disease. For more details on Dr. Gibbons research program please visit https://www.genome.gov/27557487/ gibbons-scientific-summary/. The qualified candidates should be highly motivated and have a doctoral degree with research experience and training in one of the following: genetics, genetic epidemiology, statistical genetics, computational biology, systems biology, bioinformatics, molecular biology or related fields upon the start date in the lab. Previous post-doctoral research experience in these fields is desirable. Interested applicants should submit their curriculum vitae, a detailed letter of interest, and the names of three potential references to Dr. Gary H. Gibbons. Correspondence should be sent to gibbonslabmail.nih.gov or mailed to: Gary H. Gibbons MD. c/o Adam Davis PhD. Cardiovascular Disease Section Genomics of Metabolic, Cardiovascular and Inflammatory Disease Branch National Human Genome Research Institute Building 10, Room 7N321 Bethesda, Maryland 20892 DHHS and NIH are Equal Opportunity Employers and encourage applications from women and minorities.Chapter 2 Internships, Jobs and Networking look at a profession. Current undergraduate and graduate Internships: Getting Experience MIT students are welcome to apply to the Externship Program. All applicants should submit an application form, Internships and research opportunities give you an resume and cover letter. You will find more information opportunity to apply academic concepts in practice, and online at alum.mit.edu/students/NetworkwithAlumni/ to explore possible future occupations. The experiential ExternshipProgram or contact the Alumni Association at learning and skills acquired from internships and/or externshipmit.edu, (617) 252-1143. research experience make you more marketable. MIT offers a variety of programs and some have submission Freshman/Alumni Summer Internship Program deadlines in the fall semester. If you are seeking an (F/ASIP) internship overseas, you will need to start your job search MIT’s F/ASIP is a graded seminar (SP.800/SP.801) that process at least six months to a year in advance, depending provides freshmen of any major with career development on the countries that you will be applying to. training. Through a series of virtual webinars, live seminars, and assignments, this program helps students explore Benefits of Internships and Experiential Education their career interests, cultivate professional skills, and find Programs include developing transferable skills such summer internships. In addition, participants are paired as: communication, critical thinking, teamwork, change with MIT alumni mentors who help educate them on what management, information technology, leadership, it takes to thrive in the workplace. F/ASIP starts January of self-managed learning, interpersonal diversity, ethics, freshman year and runs until September. social responsibility, and technical knowledge. Interested student should attend an information session MIT’s Opportunities for Internships and and register in the fall of freshman year. For mor information Experiential Learning about the program, visit F/ASIP on the web at gecd.mit.edu/ Most students are unsure of what they want to do for a fasip. profession. Those who think they know may not know how to get where they want to be, or what skills they need in MIT International Science & Technology order to be successful in their chosen field. The first step is Initiatives (MISTI) to explore and experience a field in an area of interest. MISTI is an international internship program offering the opportunity to gain real-life work experience in leading Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program companies and labs around the world. All expenses are (UROP) paid, including airfare. MISTI country managers work Established in 1969, UROP is MIT’s flagship academic closely with students to find a host and project aligned with research program. Participating students work with MIT their skills and interests. Before departure, students attend faculty and research staff on a wide variety of investigative MISTI Prep and Training sessions designed to help them projects, across all disciplines. Most UROP projects take explore their host country’s language, culture, history and place on campus where students can learn the valuable politics. As of 2016, MISTI internships are offered in the technical and collaborative skills necessary for future following locations: Belgium, Brazil, Chile, China, France, occupations. UROP at MIT is a widely recognized program Germany, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Korea, Mexico, and employers look upon participation favorably. For more Netherlands, Peru, Portugal, Russia, Singapore, South information, consult the UROP website web.mit.edu/urop/, Africa, Spain, Switzerland and Uganda. or contact UROP staff in Room 7-104, at uropmit.edu or (617) 253-7306. Over 700 MIT students intern each year through MISTI Student/Alumni Externship Program programs all over the world. Visit misti.mit.edu. The Alumni Association’s Student/Alumni Externship Program gives students a chance to meet and work with Undergraduate Practice Opportunities Program alumni, gain marketable job experience, and explore (UPOP) companies that could become potential employers. UPOP is a full-year professional development program Students join alumni in their workplace during the January that prepares sophomores of all majors for success in Independent Activities Period (IAP) and get a first-hand the workplace. Students receive academic training and 16 MIT Global Education & Career Developmentpersonalized coaching to foster short- and long-term Other Internship Programs and Resources professional goals, with ample assistance provided in Internships may be offered at companies, government finding and securing an internship for the summer following agencies, nonprofit organizations, other universities, sophomore year. Students also benefit from connecting and advocacy groups. Here are some helpful links to with UPOP’s expansive alumni and 2,000+ employer find opportunities: networks in a wide variety of industries. • MIT Career Services Internship Information gecd.mit.edu/jobs/intern/explore UPOP students participate in professional development workshops and one-on-one coaching during the fall and • CareerBridge: see “Job Search” and “On-Campus Recruiting Schedules”: bit.ly/careerbridge spring semesters. Students also attend a one-week course over IAP taught by MIT faculty and coached by successful • iNet Internship Network: internships available MIT alums and industry professionals. The course focuses to students from 11 universities, including MIT: on decision-making, team dynamics, and communication. inet-csm.symplicity.com/students UPOP’s 2-unit curriculum serves as the foundational year • Federal Government Internships: www.usajobs.gov, of the Bernard www.usajobs.gov/StudentsAndGrads M. Gordon-MIT • Nonprofit Internships and Information: Did you know? Engineering www.idealist.org 81% of students stated that Leadership Program. their summer experience • Going Global: great resource for international jobs helped to clarify their future and internships; on CareerBridge under Premium Further information career goals. Resources, bit.ly/careerbridge is available by Source: GECD 2013 Summer visiting the UPOP • Internship Postings through Email Blasts: to sign Experience Survey office in 1-123, or by up go to CareerBridge bit.ly/careerbridge; on your profile select the box to receive internship emails contacting staff at upopmit.edu, • Summer Internship Survey: see what MIT students (617) 253-0077, or did during their summer break; go to visiting the website gecd.mit.edu/resources/data at upop.mit.edu. Do not automatically restrict your search to the Boston area or your hometown — a summer job away from MIT and from home can be fun and broadening. Some MIT Washington DC Summer Internship Program companies will help you find housing. Some will offer The Washington DC Summer Internship Program provides housing at a local college. If you need to find a place to technically sophisticated undergraduates the opportunity live for the summer in another city, check out various online housing listings. to apply their scientific and technical training to public policy issues. The core of the program is focused on the summer months, when students work in the offices of government agencies, the private sector, and advocacy Community Service/Volunteering groups. Complementing the summer internships are a trip to Washington DC during spring break and academic Similar to internship and jobs, volunteering can provide students with opportunities to gain or enhance skills exercises. Participating students are required to attend a that employers find relevant and essential in the seminar on the policymaking process during the late spring workplace. Communication, leadership, teamwork, and early fall, for which they will receive 12 units of credit and even networking can be practiced while serving upon completion. Please see web.mit.edu/summerwash. your community. Volunteering can also be a medium for exploring possible career paths. If you are attracted to VI-A M.Eng. Thesis Program the idea of combining technical skills while contributing The VI-A M.Eng. Thesis Program enables EECS students to to society, consider career fields such as non-profit combine classroom studies with serious professional work consulting, corporate social responsibility, public policy experience in industry with competitive salaries through a and governance, and international development, to name series of leading-edge technology jobs with participating a few. companies. The VI-A program is designed to work in conjunction with the EECS five-year Master of Engineering Besides developing professional skills, volunteering can degree program culminating in an industry-based master’s be personally enriching, promoting civic responsibility and thesis. VI-A work assignments are available at both developing confidence. Companies today are beginning domestic and international locations. For more information to realize the importance of giving back and are looking see via.mit.edu/. for employees who are well-rounded and are committed gecd.mit.edu 17Source: GECD 2014 Summer Experience Survey to service. The MIT CareerBridge Public Service Center Did you know? (PSC) provides At least 60% of CareerBridge is GECD’s Campus Recruiting and Career encouragement, undergraduates and Management system. We use it for: advice, logistical 40% of master’s students • Employers to post jobs—see both “Job Search” and support, and funding completed some sort of “On-Campus Interviews”. to help students service experience while at • Managing counseling functions such as appointments, engage in meaningful MIT. as well as workshop and event registrations. and effective public Source: GECD 2015 Graduating • Housing some excellent career resources for our service work in the Student Survey students and alumni, including MyPlan self-assessment local community, tool, GoinGlobal for international jobs and careers and throughout the United for international students seeking work in the U.S., States, and around the The Versatile PhD for graduate students interested in world. To learn more about how the PSC helps MIT achieve learning about careers beyond Academia, Peter Fiske’s its mission of working wisely, creatively, and effectively for booklet on Practical Career Strategies for PhDs, and the betterment of humankind, visit web.mit.edu/mitpsc. more. Sign on at bit.ly/careerbridge and start exploring this excellent resource right away. Jobs Be sure to review the sections on Exploring Your Options MIT has some excellent resources to help you with and Job Search in Chapter 1 of this Handbook, pages 13 -14 “traditional” job search methods — responding to so you understand how to conduct an effective job search. advertised positions. Two important resources are: For information on how to find leads through the most 1) CareerBridge, MIT’s Recruiting and Career Management effective job search method, networking, please see the system, which allows companies and organizations to final sections in this chapter beginning with Networking, post available job and internship positions for our students pages 20 - 21. to apply to, and 2) Career Fairs, where students can meet employers, learn more about opportunities with their organizations, and in many cases apply for available positions. 18 MIT Global Education & Career Development

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