Writing review articles for scientific Journals

how to start writing review article and writing review article scientific
AnnyPearson Profile Pic
AnnyPearson,Qatar,Researcher
Published Date:03-07-2017
Your Website URL(Optional)
Comment
Writing a scientific review article In this activity, students write an article, paying particular attention to the structure, content, language and format used. This activity should be carried out in conjunction with ‘Writing an abstract’ and ‘Compiling a bibliography’, with ‘Evaluating scientific writing’ presenting an opportunity to evaluate the work. You could allocate a group of students to be an Outcomes editorial board to feed back to the rest of the Students will be able to: class; you could be the board yourself, or you • use their knowledge of the structure of could split the class into two, so each student scientific review articles to write a both writes and reviews as part of a board. review on a topic • identify relevant sources of information Hold short, reflective discussions with the class to complete the task. at certain points, such as: Time required 1 After the completion of research 30 minutes class time plus several homeworks (additional class time may be required for Where did students look? What did they find? Did reflective discussions as various points as they have any problems? Do they need to do discussed in the outline of the activity). more research? Have they kept a record of their sources? Outline of the activity 2 After completing their plan Explain that a review is a scientific paper that draws together the findings of a range of Have students covered all the points? Do they have adequate information about each area to researchers who have published their work in various different publications. write their report? Do they need any guidance before attempting the first draft? Depending on the ability of the group, you could set this task as a self study approach to the 3 After writing their first draft topic, or you may decide to do some initial What is good about students’ work? What do they teaching beforehand. In either case, the task need to do to improve? (This could be done using helps students to apply their knowledge and peer assessment, using an ‘editorial board’ but understanding of stem cells and their uses. you may prefer to do this later, as part of ‘Evaluating scientific writing’.) The in-class element of the task gives a chance to brief the students on what they need to do. Tips and strategies Student briefing sheet 1 gives information See next page regarding the formatting, structure and content of the article. Briefing sheet 1 details a suggested structure that students could use for their article. Briefing sheet 2 contains a brief for the article. Briefing sheet 3 provides explicit instructions on how to improve work through redrafting, and briefing sheet 4 is a sample feedback letter from the editorial board. These are provided as Word documents so you can tailor them to your needs. Hold short, reflective discussions with the class at certain points, such as: © 2008 Gatsby Technical Education Projects. This page may be copied solely for use in the purchaser’s school or college. 1 of 2 Writing a scientific review article Tips and strategies In an ideal world, different students would write reports on different aspects of the topic. But teachers will probably prefer to keep all students focussed on one area. However, you could invite students to write a report on one aspect of a topic, and compile the articles to form a class journal. Point out to students that scientific articles can take the form of research papers or reviews. Research papers give details of research to address a specific question, describing the methods used, the results of the research and the conclusions drawn. Review papers draw on a range of sources, normally research papers, to present an overview of a field or a topic. The article students are writing is akin to a review. A-level students are not in a position to write a genuine review article, but they should aim to be as formal as possible in their approach. Students will have written a whole range of reports during their education up to this point, and they should reasonably be expected to produce work of high quality. But some students will be strong scientists who may lack flair when it comes to writing. This is an opportunity to help them develop those missing skills. If using the briefing sheet, you may wish to remove some of the guidance to increase the demand of the activity to stretch more able students. © 2008 Gatsby Technical Education Projects. This page may be copied solely for use in the purchaser’s school or college. 2 of 2 Writing a scientific review article: briefing sheet 1 The task The _____________________ magazine is devoting next month’s issue to the subject of Stem cells and their uses. We are inviting students to send fascinating scientific articles. Below are the requirements and timetable for articles: Length of article: 1–2 pages, 1.5 spaces between lines. Fonts: Main title – Arial 14 point, centred Sub-title – Arial 12 point, centred Names of the author, institute and class – Arial 12 point, centred Article text – Arial 12 point, justified Right / left margins: 2.5 cm Bibliography: Attach bibliographic details of sources of information used. Submission date: Within one week of the date of publication of this invitation. In order to judge the articles, the paper has drawn up a list of criteria: a Structure • the article includes introduction, body and conclusion • the article title is formatted as above • there is a clear and logical progression of writing to deliver an argument. • presentation is enhanced by appropriate use of illustrations. b Content • the article presents content that is relevant to the subject • the scientific content is correct and accurate, and relevant How Science Works issues are discussed. © 2008 Gatsby Technical Education Projects. This page may be copied solely for use in the purchaser’s school or college. 1 of 2 Writing a scientific review article: briefing sheet 1 • the introduction provokes interest and encourages the reader to read on • use has been made of relevant and appropriate articles and the information from them. c Language • the sentences are concise and clear • the sentences are written in flowing language • the sentences are written correctly in terms of language and punctuation. 5.7 © 2008 Gatsby Technical Education Projects. This page may be copied solely for use in the purchaser’s school or college. 2 of 2 Writing a scientific review article: briefing sheet 2 Your brief You are to write an article for a magazine aimed at students of your age. What do you propose would be an interesting article, that is relevant to the study of stem cells and their uses? How many sections would you need? What pictures do you have in mind? How many words? An Editorial Board should be formed by the class and you need to submit a brief written proposal for your article to the Editorial Board. In your proposal, say how you imagine the article will look and what will be the main content. The Editorial Board will provide initial comment on all proposals. You then complete a first draft of your article as homework. 1 Use several sources of relevant information and write the first draft of your article, including images, within the time agreed. 2 In the second lesson, the Editorial Board reviews the first draft of every submitted article, using the comment sheet provided. 3 It might be useful to discuss the features of a good article, as a class. 4 Redraft your article for inclusion in a class mini-magazine. © 2008 Gatsby Technical Education Projects. This page may be copied solely for use in the purchaser’s school or college. 1 of 1 Writing a scientific review article: briefing sheet 3 How to improve your drafted work 1) Decide whether you prefer editing in hard copy or on screen. Hard copy may allow more of an evaluation of the large-scale changes needed, such as moving large chunks of text around. But, having done this, you may find it easier to make the changes you think are needed electronically. 2) Look back at the brief you were given. Have you addressed the question(s)? Have you given an overview as well as detail? Have you got the balance right - with the right amount of emphasis on what you think is really important? 3) Collect, consider and act upon comments from teachers or other students about your work. Incorporating reviewers’ comments is part of a professional writer’s work; comments should be very gratefully received 4) Check that there is no plagiarism. 5) What sort of piece are you writing? Who is your audience? Make sure that your approach is right for this. 6) Review the structure of the entire text. Move sentences or whole paragraphs so ideas link together through the document. 7) If your piece includes diagrams or other images, check that you have referenced them correctly if they are not your own work. In any case, ensure that they add to what you have to say, and that you refer to them accurately in the text. 8) Upgrade your work by considering individual statements and arguments. Can they be strengthened? Could you provide more evidence to back them? Is any data provided summarised effectively? Are there any alternative interpretations of the data? Have you provided references to sources you are using or quoting? (see plagiarism above). 9) Make sure headings reflect the structure of your piece and way ideas are presented. Make sure they are at the correct level. © 2008 Gatsby Technical Education Projects. This page may be copied solely for use in the purchaser’s school or college. 1 of 2 Writing a scientific review article: briefing sheet 3 10) Check that scientific terminology is used correctly 11) Improve the quality of the text. Read aloud to help highlight phrases which are unclear due to problems with the way ideas are expressed or with punctuation. Often short sentences are more effective than long ones. This stage should produce text which is clear, concise and correct. Check for grammatical errors and clumsy repetition of words or phrases, and for mistakes in punctuation and spelling. 12) Have you been given any instructions about the formatting of your work, such as typefaces or type sizes? If so, make sure you follow this. © 2008 Gatsby Technical Education Projects. This page may be copied solely for use in the purchaser’s school or college. 2 of 2 Writing a scientific review article: briefing sheet 4 A letter from the Editorial Board Article title: ______________________________________________________ Written by: __________________________________ Date: ________________ We have read your article, and this is our feedback: The article is accepted for the newspaper as is. Slight changes are required before the article is accepted by the magazine (the changes are marked in the body of the article) The content of the article is good, but it is not presented clearly and the reading does not flow. Please rewrite the article in accordance with the attached comments and resubmit it for review. The article is too thin on content – please supplement the article and resubmit it for review. Comments: Name(s) of reviewer(s): ________________ Date: ____________ 5.7 © 2008 Gatsby Technical Education Projects. This page may be copied solely for use in the purchaser’s school or college. 1 of 1