Investment analysis and portfolio management 10th edition answers

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LEONARDO DA VINCI Transfer of Innovation Kristina Levišauskait÷ Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management Leonardo da Vinci programme project „Development and Approbation of Applied Courses Based on the Transfer of Teaching Innovations in Finance and Management for Further Education of Entrepreneurs and Specialists in Latvia, Lithuania and Bulgaria” Vytautas Magnus University Kaunas, Lithuania 2010 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management Table of Contents Introduction …………………………………………………………………………...4 1. Investment environment and investment management process…………………...7 1.1 Investing versus financing……………………………………………………7 1.2. Direct versus indirect investment …………………………………………….9 1.3. Investment environment……………………………………………………..11 1.3.1. Investment vehicles …………………………………………………..11 1.3.2. Financial markets……………………………………………………...19 1.4. Investment management process…………………………………………….23 Summary…………………………………………………………………………..26 Key-terms…………………………………………………………………………28 Questions and problems…………………………………………………………...29 References and further readings…………………………………………………..30 Relevant websites…………………………………………………………………31 2. Quantitative methods of investment analysis……………………………………...32 2.1. Investment income and risk………………………………………………….32 2.1.1. Return on investment and expected rate of return…………………...32 2.1.2. Investment risk. Variance and standard deviation…………………...35 2.2. Relationship between risk and return………………………………………..36 2.2.1. Covariance……………………………………………………………36 2.2.2. Correlation and Coefficient of determination………………………...40 2.3. Relationship between the returns on stock and market portfolio……………42 2.3.1. Characteristic line and Beta factor…………………………………….43 2.3.2. Residual variance……………………………………………………...44 Summary…………………………………………………………………………...45 Key-terms………………………………………………………………………….48 Questions and problems…………………………………………………………...48 References and further readings…………………………………………………...50 3. Theory for investment portfolio formation………………………………………...51 3.1. Portfolio theory………………………………………………………………51 3.1.1. Markowitz portfolio theory…………………………………………...51 3.1.2. The expected rate of return and risk of portfolio……………………..54 3.2. Capital Asset Pricing Model…………………………………………………56 3.3. Arbitrage Price Theory………………………………………………………59 3.4. Market Efficiency Theory……………………………………………………62 Summary…………………………………………………………………………...64 Key-terms………………………………………………………………………….66 Questions and problems……………………………………………………………67 References and further readings…………………………………………………...70 4. Investment in stocks………………….....................................................................71 4.1. Stock as specific investment……………………………………………….....71 4.2. Stock analysis for investment decision making………………………………72 4.2.1. E-I-C analysis……………………………………………………….73 4.2.2. Fundamental analysis………………………………………………..75 4.3. Decision making of investment in stocks. Stock valuation…………………..77 4.4. Formation of stock portfolios………………………………………………...82 4.5. Strategies for investing in stocks……………………………………………..84 Summary…………………………………………………………………………..87 Key-terms…………………………………………………………………………90 2 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management Questions and problems…………………………………………………………..90 References and further readings…………………………………………………..93 Relevant websites………………………………………………………………....93 5. Investment in bonds……………………………………………………………….94 5.1. Identification and classification of bonds……………………………………94 5.2. Bond analysis: structure and contents………………………………………..98 5.2.1. Quantitative analysis…………………………………………………..98 5.2.2. Qualitative analysis…………………………………………………..101 5.2.3. Market interest rates analysis………………………………………...103 5.3. Decision making for investment in bonds. Bond valuation………………...106 5.4. Strategies for investing in bonds. Immunization…………………………...109 Summary…………………………………………………………………………113 Key-terms………………………………………………………………………..116 Questions and problems………………………………………………………….117 References and further readings………………………………………………... 118 Relevant websites………………………………………………………………..119 6. Psychological aspects in investment decision making…………………………..120 6.1. Overconfidence……………………………………………………………..120 6.2. Disposition effect…………………………………………………………...123 6.3. Perceptions of investment risk……………………………………………...124 6.4. Mental accounting and investing…………………………………………...126 6.5. Emotions and investment decisions………………………………………...128 Summary………………………………………………………………………....130 Key-terms………………………………………………………………………..132 Questions and problems………………………………………………………….132 References and further readings…………………………………………………133 7. Using options as investments……………………………………………………..135 7.1. Essentials of options………………………………………………………..135 7.2. Options pricing……………………………………………………………..136 7.3. Using options. Profit and loss on options…………………………………..138 7.4. Portfolio protection with options. Hedging………………………………...141 Summary…………………………………………………………………………143 Key-tems…………………………………………………………………………145 Questions and problems………………………………………………………….146 References and further readings…………………………………………………147 Relevant websites………………………………………………………………..147 8. Portfolio management and evaluation…………………………………………...148 8.1. Active versus passive portfolio management………………………………148 8.2. Strategic versus tactical asset allocation……………………………………150 8.3. Monitoring and revision of the portfolio…………………………………...152 8.4. Portfolio performance measures……………………………………………154 Summary…………………………………………………………………………156 Key-terms………………………………………………………………………..158 Questions and problems………………………………………………………….158 References and further readings…………………………………………………160 Relevant websites………………………………………………………………..161 Abbreviations and symbols used…………………………………………………….162 Bibliography…………………………………………………………………………164 Annexes……………………………………………………………………………...165 3 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management Introduction Motivation for Developing the Course Research by the members of the project consortium Employers’ Confederation of Latvia and Bulgarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry indicated the need for further education courses. Innovative Content of the Course The course is developed to include the following innovative content: • Key concepts of investment analysis and portfolio management which are explained from an applied perspective emphasizing the individual investors‘decision making issues. • Applied exercises and problems, which cover major topics such as quantitative methods of investment analysis and portfolio formation, stocks and bonds analysis and valuation for investment decision making, options pricing and using as investments, asset allocation, portfolio rebalancing, and portfolio performance measures. • Summaries, Key-terms, Questions and problems are provided at the end of every chapter, which aid revision and control of knowledge acquisition during self-study; • References for further readings and relevant websites for broadening knowledge and analyzing real investment environment are presented at the end of every chapter. Innovative Teaching Methods of the Course The course is developed to utilize the following innovative teaching methods: • Availability on the electronic platform with interactive learning and interactive evaluation methods; • Active use of case studies and participant centered learning; • Availability in modular form; • Utilizing two forms of learning - self-study and tutorial consultations; • Availability in several languages simultaneously. Target Audience for the Course The target audience is: entrepreneurs, finance and management specialists from Latvia, Lithuania and Bulgaria. 4 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management The course assumes little prior applied knowledge in the area of finance. The course is intended for 32 academic hours (2 credit points). Course Objectives Investment analysis and portfolio management course objective is to help entrepreneurs and practitioners to understand the investments field as it is currently understood and practiced for sound investment decisions making. Following this objective, key concepts are presented to provide an appreciation of the theory and practice of investments, focusing on investment portfolio formation and management issues. This course is designed to emphasize both theoretical and analytical aspects of investment decisions and deals with modern investment theoretical concepts and instruments. Both descriptive and quantitative materials on investing are presented. Upon completion of this course the entrepreneurs shall be able: • to describe and to analyze the investment environment, different types of investment vehicles; • to understand and to explain the logic of investment process and the contents of its’ each stage; • to use the quantitative methods for investment decision making – to calculate risk and expected return of various investment tools and the investment portfolio; • to distinguish concepts of portfolio theory and apply its’ principals in the process of investment portfolio formation; • to analyze and to evaluate relevance of stocks, bonds, options for the investments; • to understand the psychological issues in investment decision making; • to know active and passive investment strategies and to apply them in practice. The structure of the course The Course is structured in 8 chapters, covering both theoretical and analytical aspects of investment decisions: 1. Investment environment and investment process; 2. Quantitative methods of investment analysis; 3. Theory of investment portfolio formation; 4. Investment in stocks; 5 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management 5. Investment in bonds; 6. Psychological aspects in investment decision making; 7. Using options as investments; 8. Portfolio management and evaluation. Evaluation Methods As has been mentioned before, every chapter of the course contains opportunities to test the knowledge of the audience, which are in the form of questions and more involved problems. The types of question include open ended questions as well as multiple choice questions. The problems usually involve calculations using quantitative tools of investment analysis, analysis of various types of securities, finding and discussing the alternatives for investment decision making. Summary for the Course The course provides the target audience with a broad knowledge on the key topics of investment analysis and management. Course emphasizes both theoretical and analytical aspects of investment decision making, analysis and evaluation of different corporate securities as investments, portfolio diversification and management. Special attention is given to the formulation of investment policy and strategy. The course can be combined with other further professional education courses developed in the project. 6 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management 1. Investment environment and investment management process Mini-contents 1.1. Investing versus financing 1.2. Direct versus indirect investment 1.3. Investment environment 1.3.1. Investment vehicles 1.3.2. Financial markets 1.4. Investment management process Summary Key terms Questions and problems References and further readings Relevant websites 1.1. Investing versus financing The term ‘investing” could be associated with the different activities, but the common target in these activities is to “employ” the money (funds) during the time period seeking to enhance the investor’s wealth. Funds to be invested come from assets already owned, borrowed money and savings. By foregoing consumption today and investing their savings, investors expect to enhance their future consumption possibilities by increasing their wealth. But it is useful to make a distinction between real and financial investments. Real investments generally involve some kind of tangible asset, such as land, machinery, factories, etc. Financial investments involve contracts in paper or electronic form such as stocks, bonds, etc. Following the objective as it presented in the introduction this course deals only with the financial investments because the key theoretical investment concepts and portfolio theory are based on these investments and allow to analyze investment process and investment management decision making in the substantially broader context Some information presented in some chapters of this material developed for the investments course could be familiar for those who have studied other courses in finance, particularly corporate finance. Corporate finance typically covers such issues as capital structure, short-term and long-term financing, project analysis, current asset management. Capital structure addresses the question of what type of long-term financing is the best for the company under current and forecasted market conditions; project analysis is concerned with the determining whether a project should be undertaken. Current assets and current liabilities management addresses how to 7 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management manage the day-by-day cash flows of the firm. Corporate finance is also concerned with how to allocate the profit of the firm among shareholders (through the dividend payments), the government (through tax payments) and the firm itself (through retained earnings). But one of the most important questions for the company is financing. Modern firms raise money by issuing stocks and bonds. These securities are traded in the financial markets and the investors have possibility to buy or to sell securities issued by the companies. Thus, the investors and companies, searching for financing, realize their interest in the same place – in financial markets. Corporate finance area of studies and practice involves the interaction between firms and financial markets and Investments area of studies and practice involves the interaction between investors and financial markets. Investments field also differ from the corporate finance in using the relevant methods for research and decision making. Investment problems in many cases allow for a quantitative analysis and modeling approach and the qualitative methods together with quantitative methods are more often used analyzing corporate finance problems. The other very important difference is, that investment analysis for decision making can be based on the large data sets available form the financial markets, such as stock returns, thus, the mathematical statistics methods can be used. But at the same time both Corporate Finance and Investments are built upon a common set of financial principles, such as the present value, the future value, the cost of capital). And very often investment and financing analysis for decision making use the same tools, but the interpretation of the results from this analysis for the investor and for the financier would be different. For example, when issuing the securities and selling them in the market the company perform valuation looking for the higher price and for the lower cost of capital, but the investor using valuation search for attractive securities with the lower price and the higher possible required rate of return on his/ her investments. Together with the investment the term speculation is frequently used. Speculation can be described as investment too, but it is related with the short-term investment horizons and usually involves purchasing the salable securities with the hope that its price will increase rapidly, providing a quick profit. Speculators try to buy low and to sell high, their primary concern is with anticipating and profiting from market fluctuations. But as the fluctuations in the financial markets are and become 8 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management more and more unpredictable speculations are treated as the investments of highest risk. In contrast, an investment is based upon the analysis and its main goal is to promise safety of principle sum invested and to earn the satisfactory risk. There are two types of investors:  individual investors;  Institutional investors. Individual investors are individuals who are investing on their own. Sometimes individual investors are called retail investors. Institutional investors are entities such as investment companies, commercial banks, insurance companies, pension funds and other financial institutions. In recent years the process of institutionalization of investors can be observed. As the main reasons for this can be mentioned the fact, that institutional investors can achieve economies of scale, demographic pressure on social security, the changing role of banks. One of important preconditions for successful investing both for individual and institutional investors is the favorable investment environment (see section 1.3). Our focus in developing this course is on the management of individual investors’ portfolios. But the basic principles of investment management are applicable both for individual and institutional investors. 1.2. Direct versus indirect investing Investors can use direct or indirect type of investing. Direct investing is realized using financial markets and indirect investing involves financial intermediaries. The primary difference between these two types of investing is that applying direct investing investors buy and sell financial assets and manage individual investment portfolio themselves. Consequently, investing directly through financial markets investors take all the risk and their successful investing depends on their understanding of financial markets, its fluctuations and on their abilities to analyze and to evaluate the investments and to manage their investment portfolio. Contrary, using indirect type of investing investors are buying or selling financial instruments of financial intermediaries (financial institutions) which invest large pools of funds in the financial markets and hold portfolios. Indirect investing relieves investors from making decisions about their portfolio. As shareholders with the ownership interest in the portfolios managed by financial institutions (investment 9 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management companies, pension funds, insurance companies, commercial banks) the investors are entitled to their share of dividends, interest and capital gains generated and pay their share of the institution’s expenses and portfolio management fee. The risk for investor using indirect investing is related more with the credibility of chosen institution and the professionalism of portfolio managers. In general, indirect investing is more related with the financial institutions which are primarily in the business of investing in and managing a portfolio of securities (various types of investment funds or investment companies, private pension funds). By pooling the funds of thousands of investors, those companies can offer them a variety of services, in addition to diversification, including professional management of their financial assets and liquidity. Investors can “employ” their funds by performing direct transactions, bypassing both financial institutions and financial markets (for example, direct lending). But such transactions are very risky, if a large amount of money is transferred only to one’s hands, following the well known American proverb “don't put all your eggs in one basket” (Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, 2nd ed. Cambridge University Press 2006). That turns to the necessity to diversify your investments. From the other side, direct transactions in the businesses are strictly limited by laws avoiding possibility of money laundering. All types of investing discussed above and their relationship with the alternatives of financing are presented in Table 1.1. Table 1.1. Types of investing and alternatives for financing Types of investing in the economy Alternatives for financing in the economy Direct investing Raising equity capital or borrowing (through financial markets) in financial markets Indirect investing Borrowing from financial institutions (through financial institutions) Direct transactions Direct borrowing, partnership contracts Companies can obtain necessary funds directly from the general public (those who have excess money to invest) by the use of the financial market, issuing and selling their securities. Alternatively, they can obtain funds indirectly from the general public by using financial intermediaries. And the intermediaries acquire funds by allowing the general public to maintain such investments as savings accounts, Certificates of deposit accounts and other similar vehicles. 10 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management 1.3. Investment environment Investment environment can be defined as the existing investment vehicles in the market available for investor and the places for transactions with these investment vehicles. Thus further in this subchapter the main types of investment vehicles and the types of financial markets will be presented and described. 1.3.1. Investment vehicles As it was presented in 1.1, in this course we are focused to the financial investments that mean the object will be financial assets and the marketable securities in particular. But even if further in this course only the investments in financial assets are discussed, for deeper understanding the specifics of financial assets comparison of some important characteristics of investment in this type of assets with the investment in physical assets is presented. Investment in financial assets differs from investment in physical assets in those important aspects: • Financial assets are divisible, whereas most physical assets are not. An asset is divisible if investor can buy or sell small portion of it. In case of financial assets it means, that investor, for example, can buy or sell a small fraction of the whole company as investment object buying or selling a number of common stocks. • Marketability (or Liquidity) is a characteristic of financial assets that is not shared by physical assets, which usually have low liquidity. Marketability (or liquidity) reflects the feasibility of converting of the asset into cash quickly and without affecting its price significantly. Most of financial assets are easy to buy or to sell in the financial markets. • The planned holding period of financial assets can be much shorter than the holding period of most physical assets. The holding period for investments is defined as the time between signing a purchasing order for asset and selling the asset. Investors acquiring physical asset usually plan to hold it for a long period, but investing in financial assets, such as securities, even for some months or a year can be reasonable. Holding period for investing in financial assets vary in very wide interval and depends on the investor’s goals and investment strategy. 11 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management • Information about financial assets is often more abundant and less costly to obtain, than information about physical assets. Information availability shows the real possibility of the investors to receive the necessary information which could influence their investment decisions and investment results. Since a big portion of information important for investors in such financial assets as stocks, bonds is publicly available, the impact of many disclosed factors having influence on value of these securities can be included in the analysis and the decisions made by investors. Even if we analyze only financial investment there is a big variety of financial investment vehicles. The on going processes of globalization and integration open wider possibilities for the investors to invest into new investment vehicles which were unavailable for them some time ago because of the weak domestic financial systems and limited technologies for investment in global investment environment. Financial innovations suggest for the investors the new choices of investment but at the same time make the investment process and investment decisions more complicated, because even if the investors have a wide range of alternatives to invest they can’t forgot the key rule in investments: invest only in what you really understand. Thus the investor must understand how investment vehicles differ from each other and only then to pick those which best match his/her expectations. The most important characteristics of investment vehicles on which bases the overall variety of investment vehicles can be assorted are the return on investment and the risk which is defined as the uncertainty about the actual return that will be earned on an investment (determination and measurement of returns on investments and risks will be examined in Chapter 2). Each type of investment vehicles could be characterized by certain level of profitability and risk because of the specifics of these financial instruments. Though all different types of investment vehicles can be compared using characteristics of risk and return and the most risky as well as less risky investment vehicles can be defined. However the risk and return on investment are close related and only using both important characteristics we can really understand the differences in investment vehicles. The main types of financial investment vehicles are: • Short term investment vehicles; • Fixed-income securities; 12 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management • Common stock; • Speculative investment vehicles; • Other investment tools. Short - term investment vehicles are all those which have a maturity of one year or less. Short term investment vehicles often are defined as money-market instruments, because they are traded in the money market which presents the financial market for short term (up to one year of maturity) marketable financial assets. The risk as well as the return on investments of short-term investment vehicles usually is lower than for other types of investments. The main short term investment vehicles are: • Certificates of deposit; • Treasury bills; • Commercial paper; • Bankers’ acceptances; • Repurchase agreements. Certificate of deposit is debt instrument issued by bank that indicates a specified sum of money has been deposited at the issuing depository institution. Certificate of deposit bears a maturity date and specified interest rate and can be issued in any denomination. Most certificates of deposit cannot be traded and they incur penalties for early withdrawal. For large money-market investors financial institutions allow their large-denomination certificates of deposits to be traded as negotiable certificates of deposits. Treasury bills (also called T-bills) are securities representing financial obligations of the government. Treasury bills have maturities of less than one year. They have the unique feature of being issued at a discount from their nominal value and the difference between nominal value and discount price is the only sum which is paid at the maturity for these short term securities because the interest is not paid in cash, only accrued. The other important feature of T-bills is that they are treated as risk-free securities ignoring inflation and default of a government, which was rare in developed countries, the T-bill will pay the fixed stated yield with certainty. But, of course, the yield on T-bills changes over time influenced by changes in overall macroeconomic situation. T-bills are issued on an auction basis. The issuer accepts competitive bids and allocates bills to those offering the highest prices. Non- competitive bid is an offer to purchase the bills at a price that equals the average of the 13 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management competitive bids. Bills can be traded before the maturity, while their market price is subject to change with changes in the rate of interest. But because of the early maturity dates of T-bills large interest changes are needed to move T-bills prices very far. Bills are thus regarded as high liquid assets. Commercial paper is a name for short-term unsecured promissory notes issued by corporation. Commercial paper is a means of short-term borrowing by large corporations. Large, well-established corporations have found that borrowing directly from investors through commercial paper is cheaper than relying solely on bank loans. Commercial paper is issued either directly from the firm to the investor or through an intermediary. Commercial paper, like T-bills is issued at a discount. The most common maturity range of commercial paper is 30 to 60 days or less. Commercial paper is riskier than T-bills, because there is a larger risk that a corporation will default. Also, commercial paper is not easily bought and sold after it is issued, because the issues are relatively small compared with T-bills and hence their market is not liquid. Banker‘s acceptances are the vehicles created to facilitate commercial trade transactions. These vehicles are called bankers acceptances because a bank accepts the responsibility to repay a loan to the holder of the vehicle in case the debtor fails to perform. Banker‘s acceptances are short-term fixed-income securities that are created by non-financial firm whose payment is guaranteed by a bank. This short-term loan contract typically has a higher interest rate than similar short –term securities to compensate for the default risk. Since bankers’ acceptances are not standardized, there is no active trading of these securities. Repurchase agreement (often referred to as a repo) is the sale of security with a commitment by the seller to buy the security back from the purchaser at a specified price at a designated future date. Basically, a repo is a collectivized short-term loan, where collateral is a security. The collateral in a repo may be a Treasury security, other money-market security. The difference between the purchase price and the sale price is the interest cost of the loan, from which repo rate can be calculated. Because of concern about default risk, the length of maturity of repo is usually very short. If the agreement is for a loan of funds for one day, it is called overnight repo; if the term of the agreement is for more than one day, it is called a term repo. A reverse repo is the opposite of a repo. In this transaction a corporation buys the securities with an 14 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management agreement to sell them at a specified price and time. Using repos helps to increase the liquidity in the money market. Our focus in this course further will be not investment in short-term vehicles but it is useful for investor to know that short term investment vehicles provide the possibility for temporary investing of money/ funds and investors use these instruments managing their investment portfolio. Fixed-income securities are those which return is fixed, up to some redemption date or indefinitely. The fixed amounts may be stated in money terms or indexed to some measure of the price level. This type of financial investments is presented by two different groups of securities: • Long-term debt securities • Preferred stocks. Long-term debt securities can be described as long-term debt instruments representing the issuer’s contractual obligation. Long term securities have maturity longer than 1 year. The buyer (investor) of these securities is landing money to the issuer, who undertake obligation periodically to pay interest on this loan and repay the principal at a stated maturity date. Long-term debt securities are traded in the capital markets. From the investor’s point of view these securities can be treated as a “safe” asset. But in reality the safety of investment in fixed –income securities is strongly related with the default risk of an issuer. The major representatives of long-term debt securities are bonds, but today there are a big variety of different kinds of bonds, which differ not only by the different issuers (governments, municipals, companies, agencies, etc.), but by different schemes of interest payments which is a result of bringing financial innovations to the long-term debt securities market. As demand for borrowing the funds from the capital markets is growing the long-term debt securities today are prevailing in the global markets. And it is really become the challenge for investor to pick long-term debt securities relevant to his/ her investment expectations, including the safety of investment. We examine the different kinds of long-term debt securities and their features important to understand for the investor in Chapter 5, together with the other aspects in decision making investing in bonds. Preferred stocks are equity security, which has infinitive life and pay dividends. But preferred stock is attributed to the type of fixed-income securities, because the dividend for preferred stock is fixed in amount and known in advance. 15 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management Though, this security provides for the investor the flow of income very similar to that of the bond. The main difference between preferred stocks and bonds is that for preferred stock the flows are for ever, if the stock is not callable. The preferred stockholders are paid after the debt securities holders but before the common stock holders in terms of priorities in payments of income and in case of liquidation of the company. If the issuer fails to pay the dividend in any year, the unpaid dividends will have to be paid if the issue is cumulative. If preferred stock is issued as noncumulative, dividends for the years with losses do not have to be paid. Usually same rights to vote in general meetings for preferred stockholders are suspended. Because of having the features attributed for both equity and fixed-income securities preferred stocks is known as hybrid security. A most preferred stock is issued as noncumulative and callable. In recent years the preferred stocks with option of convertibility to common stock are proliferating. The common stock is the other type of investment vehicles which is one of most popular among investors with long-term horizon of their investments. Common stock represents the ownership interest of corporations or the equity of the stock holders. Holders of common stock are entitled to attend and vote at a general meeting of shareholders, to receive declared dividends and to receive their share of the residual assets, if any, if the corporation is bankrupt. The issuers of the common stock are the companies which seek to receive funds in the market and though are “going public”. The issuing common stocks and selling them in the market enables the company to raise additional equity capital more easily when using other alternative sources. Thus many companies are issuing their common stocks which are traded in financial markets and investors have wide possibilities for choosing this type of securities for the investment. The questions important for investors for investment in common stock decision making will be discussed in Chapter 4. Speculative investment vehicles following the term “speculation” (see p.8) could be defined as investments with a high risk and high investment return. Using these investment vehicles speculators try to buy low and to sell high, their primary concern is with anticipating and profiting from the expected market fluctuations. The only gain from such investments is the positive difference between selling and purchasing prices. Of course, using short-term investment strategies investors can use for speculations other investment vehicles, such as common stock, but here we try to 16 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management accentuate the specific types of investments which are more risky than other investment vehicles because of their nature related with more uncertainty about the changes influencing the their price in the future. Speculative investment vehicles could be presented by these different vehicles: • Options; • Futures; • Commodities, traded on the exchange (coffee, grain metals, other commodities); Options are the derivative financial instruments. An options contract gives the owner of the contract the right, but not the obligation, to buy or to sell a financial asset at a specified price from or to another party. The buyer of the contract must pay a fee (option price) for the seller. There is a big uncertainty about if the buyer of the option will take the advantage of it and what option price would be relevant, as it depends not only on demand and supply in the options market, but on the changes in the other market where the financial asset included in the option contract are traded. Though, the option is a risky financial instrument for those investors who use it for speculations instead of hedging. The main aspects of using options for investment will be discussed in Chapter 7. Futures are the other type of derivatives. A future contract is an agreement between two parties than they agree tom transact with the respect to some financial asset at a predetermined price at a specified future date. One party agree to buy the financial asset, the other agrees to sell the financial asset. It is very important, that in futures contract case both parties are obligated to perform and neither party charges the fee. There are two types of people who deal with options (and futures) contracts: speculators and hedgers. Speculators buy and sell futures for the sole purpose of making a profit by closing out their positions at a price that is better than the initial price. Such people neither produce nor use the asset in the ordinary course of business. In contrary, hedgers buy and sell futures to offset an otherwise risky position in the market. Transactions using derivatives instruments are not limited to financial assets. There are derivatives, involving different commodities (coffee, grain, precious metals, 17 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management and other commodities). But in this course the target is on derivatives where underlying asset is a financial asset. Other investment tools: • Various types of investment funds; • Investment life insurance; • Pension funds; • Hedge funds. Investment companies/ investment funds. They receive money from investors with the common objective of pooling the funds and then investing them in securities according to a stated set of investment objectives. Two types of funds: • open-end funds (mutual funds) , • closed-end funds (trusts). Open-end funds have no pre-determined amount of stocks outstanding and they can buy back or issue new shares at any point. Price of the share is not determined by demand, but by an estimate of the current market value of the fund’s net assets per share (NAV) and a commission. Closed-end funds are publicly traded investment companies that have issued a specified number of shares and can only issue additional shares through a new public issue. Pricing of closed-end funds is different from the pricing of open-end funds: the market price can differ from the NAV. Insurance Companies are in the business of assuming the risks of adverse events (such as fires, accidents, etc.) in exchange for a flow of insurance premiums. Insurance companies are investing the accumulated funds in securities (treasury bonds, corporate stocks and bonds), real estate. Three types of Insurance Companies: life insurance; non-life insurance (also known as property-casualty insurance) and re- insurance. During recent years investment life insurance became very popular investment alternative for individual investors, because this hybrid investment product allows to buy the life insurance policy together with possibility to invest accumulated life insurance payments or lump sum for a long time selecting investment program relevant to investor‘s future expectations. Pension Funds are an asset pools that accumulates over an employee’s working years and pays retirement benefits during the employee’s nonworking years. Pension 18 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management funds are investing the funds according to a stated set of investment objectives in securities (treasury bonds, corporate stocks and bonds), real estate. Hedge funds are unregulated private investment partnerships, limited to institutions and high-net-worth individuals, which seek to exploit various market opportunities and thereby to earn larger returns than are ordinarily available. They require a substantial initial investment from investors and usually have some restrictions on how quickly investor can withdraw their funds. Hedge funds take concentrated speculative positions and can be very risky. It could be noted that originally, the term “hedge” made some sense when applied to these funds. They would by combining different types of investments, including derivatives, try to hedge risk while seeking higher return. But today the word “hedge’ is misapplied to these funds because they generally take an aggressive strategies investing in stock, bond and other financial markets around the world and their level of risk is high. 1.3.2. Financial markets Financial markets are the other important component of investment environment. Financial markets are designed to allow corporations and governments to raise new funds and to allow investors to execute their buying and selling orders. In financial markets funds are channeled from those with the surplus, who buy securities, to those, with shortage, who issue new securities or sell existing securities. A financial market can be seen as a set of arrangements that allows trading among its participants. Financial market provides three important economic functions (Frank J. Fabozzi, 1999): 1. Financial market determines the prices of assets traded through the interactions between buyers and sellers; 2. Financial market provides a liquidity of the financial assets; 3. Financial market reduces the cost of transactions by reducing explicit costs, such as money spent to advertise the desire to buy or to sell a financial asset. Financial markets could be classified on the bases of those characteristics: • Sequence of transactions for selling and buying securities; • Term of circulation of financial assets traded in the market; • Economic nature of securities, traded in the market; 19 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management • From the perspective of a given country. By sequence of transactions for selling and buying securities:  Primary market  Secondary market All securities are first traded in the primary market, and the secondary market provides liquidity for these securities. Primary market is where corporate and government entities can raise capital and where the first transactions with the new issued securities are performed. If a company’s share is traded in the primary market for the first time this is referred to as an initial public offering (IPO). Investment banks play an important role in the primary market: • Usually handle issues in the primary market; • Among other things, act as underwriter of a new issue, guaranteeing the proceeds to the issuer. Secondary market - where previously issued securities are traded among investors. Generally, individual investors do not have access to secondary markets. They use security brokers to act as intermediaries for them. The broker delivers an orders received form investors in securities to a market place, where these orders are executed. Finally, clearing and settlement processes ensure that both sides to these transactions honor their commitment. Types of brokers: • Discount broker, who executes only trades in the secondary market; • Full service broker, who provides a wide range of additional services to clients (ex., advice to buy or sell); • Online broker is a brokerage firm that allows investors to execute trades electronically using Internet. Types of secondary market places: • Organized security exchanges; • Over-the-counter markets; • Alternative trading system. An organized security exchange provides the facility for the members to trade securities, and only exchange members may trade there. The members include brokerage firms, which offer their services to individual investors, charging commissions for executing trades on their behalf. Other exchange members by or sell 20

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