How long is a Phd

This document consist of phd rules and ph.d guidelines. phd. interview preparation guide phd. interview preparation guide for positions in academia Download free pdf
Dr.CherylStam Profile Pic
Dr.CherylStam,New Zealand,Researcher
Published Date:04-07-2017
Your Website URL(Optional)
Comment
THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO BOOTH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Ph.D. Program Guidebook For Students Matriculating In The 2014-15 Academic Year Pietro Veronesi, Director Malaina Brown, Senior Associate Director Amity James, Assistant Director Casey Gregg, Manager Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................................................4 Area Advisors ........................................................................................................................................................................ 4 Mission Statement ................................................................................................................................................................. 5 CHAPTER 1 – FACULTY EXPECTATIONS AND TIMELINE .................................................................................6 Faculty Expectations and Timeline ....................................................................................................................................... 6 CHAPTER 2 – PH.D. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS ......................................................................................................7 Brief Outline .......................................................................................................................................................................... 7 Details .................................................................................................................................................................................... 7 Dissertation Area General Examination Requirements ...............................................................................................7 Support Area General Examination Requirements ......................................................................................................8 Coordinated Sequence ..................................................................................................................................................9 Dissertation Area Workshop Requirement ...................................................................................................................9 Curriculum Paper .........................................................................................................................................................9 Candidacy Requirements ........................................................................................................................................... 10 Dissertation Proposal ................................................................................................................................................ 11 Dissertation Defense .................................................................................................................................................. 11 CHAPTER 3 – GENERAL EXAMINATION REQUIREMENTS BY AREA ........................................................ 12 Accounting ........................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Behavioral Science .............................................................................................................................................................. 16 Econometrics & Statistics ................................................................................................................................................... 19 Economics ........................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Finance ................................................................................................................................................................................ 26 Management Science/Operations Management ................................................................................................................. 30 Marketing ............................................................................................................................................................................ 37 Organizations and Markets .................................................................................................................................................. 41 CHAPTER 4 – ACADEMIC PROGRESS ..................................................................................................................... 47 Satisfactory Academic Progress Requirements ................................................................................................................... 47 Consequences of Unsatisfactory Academic Progress.......................................................................................................... 48 CHAPTER 5 – CO-AUTHORSHIP ................................................................................................................................ 49 Faculty Co-Author ............................................................................................................................................................... 49 Student Co-Author ............................................................................................................................................................... 49 CHAPTER 6 – PH.D. DISSERTATION ........................................................................................................................ 50 Ph.D. Dissertation Committee ............................................................................................................................................. 50 Scheduling the Dissertation Proposal or Defense ................................................................................................................ 50 Graduation Procedures ......................................... ………………………………………………………………………51 Provisional Grades ............................................................................................................................................................... 53 CHAPTER 7 – CHANGES IN STATUS ........................................................................................................................ 55 Changing Dissertation Areas ............................................................................................................................................... 55 Leave of Absence ................................................................................................................................................................ 55 rev. 8/2014 1 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 Withdrawal from the Ph.D. Program ................................................................................................................................... 55 Re-admittance into the Ph.D. Program ................................................................................................................................ 55 CHAPTER 8 – M.B.A DEGREE FOR PH.D. STUDENTS ......................................................................................... 57 CHAPTER 9 – VISITING STUDENTS AND CIC AND EXCHANGE SCHOLARS ............................................. 59 CHAPTER 10 – COURSE REGISTRATION AND GRADING ................................................................................ 60 Approval of Course Registration ........................................................................................................................................ 60 Registration: Booth Courses ................................................................................................................................................ 60 Registration: Non-Booth Courses ........................................................................................................................................ 61 Schedule Adjustments ......................................................................................................................................................... 61 Workshop Registration ........................................................................................................................................................ 61 Course Registration for B31901 and B71900 ..................................................................................................................... 61 Summer Courses .................................................................................................................................................................. 62 Registration for Curricular Practical Training (CPT) or Academic Training (AT) ........................................................... 62 Course Grades ...................................................................................................................................................................... 62 Grade Point Average Calculation ........................................................................................................................................ 62 Pass/Fail Grades ................................................................................................................................................................... 63 Official Audit ....................................................................................................................................................................... 63 Incompletes and Blank Grades ............................................................................................................................................ 63 Obtaining Grades ................................................................................................................................................................. 64 Official Transcripts .............................................................................................................................................................. 64 Grade Appeal Procedures .................................................................................................................................................... 64 Academic Grievances .......................................................................................................................................................... 65 Restricted Registration ......................................................................................................................................................... 65 CHAPTER 11 – FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE ............................................................................................................... 67 Tuition Grants ...................................................................................................................................................................... 67 Stipends ................................................................................................................................................................................ 67 st 1 Year Summer Research Awards .................................................................................................................................... 67 Ph.D. Program Special Fellowship Awards ........................................................................................................................ 68 Non-Booth and Non-University Research Fellowships ...................................................................................................... 69 Research Assistantships (RA), Teaching Assistantships (TA) and Tutoring ...................................................................... 69 Support for Travel, Data, and Human Subject Research..................................................................................................... 70 Marjorie Walters Memorial Emergency Loan Fund ........................................................................................................... 71 Other Loan Assistance and Federal Aid Eligibility ............................................................................................................. 71 CHAPTER 12 – COMPUTING FACILITIES, RESOURCES AND POLICIES ..................................................... 72 Ph.D. Program Computing Resources ................................................................................................................................. 72 Information Technology Policies ........................................................................................................................................ 72 Ph.D. Student Computer Lab Rules..................................................................................................................................... 73 CHAPTER 13 – LOCKERS AND CARRELS .............................................................................................................. 75 Locked File Drawers............................................................................................................................................................ 75 Ph.D. Student Office Space (Carrels) .................................................................................................................................. 75 CHAPTER 14 – OTHER UNIVERSITY AND BOOTH POLICIES ......................................................................... 76 University Residence and Registration Requirements (including Leave of Absence) .................................................. 76 Health Insurance and Student Health and Wellness Fee ............................................................................................ 80 Graduate Student Parent Policy .......................................................................................................................................... 80 Immunization Requirements................................................................................................................................................ 80 Students With Disabilities ...................................................................................................................................... 80 Confidentiality of Student Records and Information .......................................................................................................... 81 Official Name Change ......................................................................................................................................................... 81 Community Directory .......................................................................................................................................................... 81 Student Contact Information................................................................................................................................................ 83 rev. 8/2014 2 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 INTRODUCTION This guidebook provides general and specific information for Ph.D. students at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business (Booth) who matriculate during the 2014- 15 academic year. The general procedures and rules (not associated with dissertation area requirements) in this Guidebook apply to all Ph.D. students, regardless of year of matriculation, unless otherwise specified. Ph.D. students should refer to this Guidebook for information regarding the general and specific Ph.D. degree requirements and for information regarding other Ph.D. Program procedures and rules. Students who matriculate during the 2014-15 academic year may choose to use those dissertation area requirements outlined in this Guidebook (2014-15) or those specified in the 2013-14 Guidebook (the requirements in place when the student was admitted to the Program). This decision is up to the student. Specific dissertation and support area requirements for a student who changes dissertation areas will be determined by the area to which the student transfers at the time of the transfer. You may access this Guidebook and other information about the University of Chicago and Chicago Booth at the following internet addresses: Chicago Booth Ph.D. Program internal website – available by login through the Booth Portal at http://portal.chicagobooth.edu or directly at http://programs.chicagobooth.edu/phd/ This Guidebook complements the University’s Student Manual of University Policies and Regulations. Knowledge of policies outlined in both is every student’s responsibility. The contents of this publication are subject to change. For the most updated version of the Guidebook, please refer to the above-mentioned websites. Area Advisors A student chooses a dissertation area before entering the Ph.D. Program. Dissertation areas include: Accounting, Behavioral Science, Econometrics and Statistics, Economics, Finance, Management Science/Operations Management, Marketing or Organizations and Markets. Each of these areas is supervised by a faculty advisor, a member of the faculty specializing in that area. These area advisors supervise the evaluation of applications to their respective areas, counsel new students on the curriculum in that area and how to plan their 5-year course of study, and serve as advisors to all the students in their respective areas throughout their course of study. For the academic year 2014-15 these area advisors are the following Booth faculty members: Accounting – Philip Berger, Wallman Family Professor of Accounting Behavioral Science – Reid Hastie, Ralph and Dorothy Keller Distinguished Service Professor of Behavioral Science Econometrics and Statistics – Ruey Tsay, H.G.B. Alexander Professor of Econometrics and Statistics Economics – Canice Prendergast, W. Allen Wallis Professor of Economics Finance –Amit Seru, Professor of Finance Management Science/Operations Management –Baris Ata, Professor of Operations Management Marketing – Pradeep Chintagunta, Joseph T. and Bernice S. Lewis Distinguished Service Professor of Marketing Organizations and Markets – Ronald S. Burt, Hobart W. Williams Professor of Sociology and Strategy rev. 8/2014 4 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 Mission Statement The mission of the Ph.D. program is to train prospective scholars to become highly skilled and innovative researchers and teachers in various aspects of business and to prepare them for careers as faculty members at premier academic institutions throughout the world. Faculty: The University and Chicago Booth faculty members are highly skilled and innovative researchers who publish in leading academic journals. Academic Seminars: Numerous academic seminars provide an open forum to observe the presentation of, and critically comment on, the research of Booth faculty, advanced Ph.D. students, and visiting faculty from other academic institutions. Ph.D. Courses at Booth offers leading edge Ph.D. courses that focus on conducting Chicago Booth: innovative academic research. Ph.D. Courses in Other The Ph.D. Program integrates its training with the faculty and Schools and courses in other schools and departments within the University. Departments: Computing and Booth maintains computing resources for its faculty and Ph.D. Database Resources: students, and develops and maintains access to databases needed to conduct academic research. rev. 8/2014 5 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 CHAPTER 1 – FACULTY EXPECTATIONS AND TIMELINE Faculty Expectations and Timeline Generally, students are expected to be “in residence” during all four academic quarters; the University has specific residency requirements that are outlined in Chapter 14 – Other University and BOOTH Policies. First Year • Complete coursework during the autumn, winter, and spring academic quarters and work on a research paper during the summer. • Complete the General Examination requirements in the support area or the dissertation area (this depends upon area). Second Year • Complete course work during the autumn, winter, and spring quarters and work on a research projectthe curriculum paperduring the summer. • Complete the general examination requirements in the dissertation area or the support area (this depends upon area). • Register for, attend, and receive a P/F grade for the weekly workshop in the area of specialization. Third Year • Complete curriculum paper by the end of the autumn quarter. • Present the curriculum paper in a workshop during the winter or spring quarters. • Begin the dissertation proposal during the spring quarter. • Register for, attend and receive a P/F grade for the weekly workshop in the area of specialization. • Reach Candidacy by the end of summer quarter. Fourth Year • Take specialized courses as needed to develop the area of expertise. • Complete the dissertation proposal. • Make substantial progress on the dissertation. Fifth Year and beyond • Finish and defend the dissertation. Deadlines: • Reach candidacy within a maximum of four years from the date of matriculation. • Propose the dissertation within five years from the date of matriculation. • Defend the dissertation within seven years from the date of matriculation. These times represent generous upper limits. Most students will complete their studies within five years of matriculation. If, after careful monitoring and guidance from the Ph.D. Program Office, students cannot meet the requirements for candidacy within the allowed four years, they will be advised to leave the Program. Similarly, students who reach candidacy within the allowed four years, but then fail to propose and defend a dissertation within the three subsequent years, will also be withdrawn from the Program. rev. 8/2014 6 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 CHAPTER 2 – PH.D. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Brief Outline Within the general and area-specific degree requirements, students are encouraged to design their academic program to suit their individual research interests and educational backgrounds. The Ph.D. general degree requirements are as follows: Dissertation Area: Successfully complete the general examination requirements in the student’s dissertation area: Accounting, Behavioral Science, Econometrics and Statistics, Economics (and its related fields of study), Finance, Management Science/Operations Management, Marketing, or Organizations and Markets. Support Area: Successfully complete the General Examination requirements in a basic discipline that supports the student’s dissertation area: Behavioral Science, Econometrics and Statistics, Economics, Management Science/Operations Management, or Organizations and Markets. Behavioral Science and O&M students have additional support area options, as outlined in the general examination requirements. Economics students complete field specializations, which serve as their support area. Coordinated Sequence: The coordinated sequence is required by some dissertation areas but not by others. In those areas that require it, students should successfully complete a three-course sequence, generally in an area other than the dissertation and support areas. Some dissertation areas require specific coordinated sequences. The General Examination Requirements by Area detail whether the coordinated sequence is required. Dissertation Area Workshop: Successfully register for and participate in a workshop in the student’s dissertation area during the student’s second and third years in the Program. Generally, each quarter the student must write and submit summaries of any two presentations during that quarter. Grading is pass/fail. A total of six quarters with a grade of pass is required. Curriculum Paper and Presentation: Write an original research paper and present it in a curriculum paper workshop. The paper must be completed by the end of autumn quarter of the third year and the workshop presentation must take place during winter or spring quarter of the third year. Candidacy Requirements: Certification of candidacy indicates that a student has completed the above listed requirements and has reached the advanced stage of the Ph.D. Program, permitting him/her to devote full-time to writing a dissertation. Dissertation Proposal: Initiate a major piece of original research (the dissertation proposal) and present it for faculty approval at a dissertation proposal seminar. Dissertation Defense: Complete a satisfactory dissertation and defend it successfully at a dissertation defense seminar. This research is the completion and extension of the research presented at the student’s dissertation proposal seminar. Details Dissertation Area General Examination Requirements A student declares his or her intended dissertation area before entering the Ph.D. Program. Dissertation areas include: Accounting, Behavioral Science, Econometrics and Statistics, Economics, Finance, Management Science/Operations Management, Marketing, or Organizations and Markets. rev. 8/2014 7 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 A student must successfully complete the General Examination requirements in the student’s dissertation area as part of the Ph.D. general degree requirements. The General Examination requirements may include but are not limited to: successful completion of specific courses, research papers, research workshops, reading lists, a written examination, and a faculty evaluation of the above; General Examination requirements may also require specific GPAs and a specified course load per quarter. The written part of the General Examination requirements is typically administered once a year, often between June and September. Usually, the dissertation area exam requirements should be completed by the end of the second year in the Program. Examinations in Absentia If the chair of the examination committee approves, examinations may be written in absentia with the approval of the Director of the Ph.D. Program. Examination Results Students receive the results of the written part of their General Examination requirements from the Area Advisor for their dissertation area or the PhD Program Office. Examinations Not Passed If a student fails the General Examination or other area requirements, the Director of the Ph.D. Program will consult with area faculty and decide if the student may continue the program in that area, should apply to change dissertation areas, or should be withdrawn from the Program. If a student is allowed to continue after initially failing the General Examination or other area requirements, s/he gets one more attempt to pass all components of the examination. Failure to pass all components on the second attempt will result in withdrawal from the program. Course Overlap Generally, courses taken to satisfy the dissertation area requirements cannot be used to satisfy any other Ph.D. course or General Examination requirement. Support Area General Examination Requirements A student must successfully complete the General Examination requirement in an area that supports the student’s dissertation area as part of the Ph.D. general degree requirements. Support areas include: Behavioral Science, Econometrics and Statistics, Economics, Management Science/Operations Management, and Organizations and Markets. The General Examination requirements may include completion of specific courses, research papers, research workshops, a written and/or oral examination, and a faculty evaluation of these requirements. The written portion of the General Examination requirements is administered once a year, usually between June and September. Generally, the support area General Examination requirements should be completed by the end of the first year in the Program (but this varies by dissertation area). Examinations In Absentia If the chair of the examination committee approves, examinations may be written in absentia with the approval of the Director of the Ph.D. Program. Examinations Not Passed If a student fails the written part of the General Examination requirements in a support area for the first time, the student may take the written examination in that support area again, or change support areas. If the student fails a written examination again, in either the original rev. 8/2014 8 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 or second support area, the Director of the Ph.D. Program will consult with the faculty in the student’s dissertation area and decide if the student may continue the Ph.D. program. Course Overlap Generally, courses taken to satisfy the support area requirements cannot be used to satisfy any other Ph.D. course or General Examination requirement. General Examination Timeline Students must pass one exam by the end of the second year and two by the end of the third year. Coordinated Sequence If the student’s dissertation area requires it, s/he must complete a three-course sequence with an average grade of “B” (3.0) or higher, generally in an area other than the dissertation or support area. Suggested coordinated sequences are listed under each area’s general examination requirements. Some dissertation areas require specific coordinated sequences. It is possible to create sequences of courses in other University schools or departments with the approval of the Director of the Ph.D. Program. Course Credit Students may use graduate courses taken at other approved institutions to satisfy the coordinated sequence requirements with the approval of the area advisor and the Director of the Ph.D. Program. Course Overlap Generally, courses taken to satisfy the coordinated sequence requirement cannot be used to satisfy any other Ph.D. course or General Examination requirement. Dissertation Area Workshop Requirement To fulfill this requirement, Ph.D. students must register as a workshop participant for the workshop required by their dissertation area during each academic quarter of the student’s second and third years in the Program - a total of 6 quarters. The workshop participant course requirements vary by area. The minimum requirements are that students attend scheduled seminars; some areas require that students write a short summary and critical comments on two papers presented in the seminar in each quarter. The workshops are graded on a pass/fail basis by the faculty member in charge of the seminar during the quarter. The student should check with the professor in charge of the workshop at the beginning of the quarter to determine the requirements for that quarter’s workshop. The Ph.D. Program emphasizes the development of the student’s capacity to conduct original research. Successful completion of the program in a timely manner depends on the ability of the student to work independently and to identify, analyze, and solve research problems effectively and creatively. Workshops provide a transition in emphasis for the student from courses to research and afford a testing ground for dissertation proposals. The workshops supplement the formal course work and provide depth to the student’s understanding of his or her dissertation area. Moreover, they provide an opportunity for the student to gain experience in critiquing and presenting material before an interested and critical group. Curriculum Paper Each student must write an original research paper and present it at a workshop during his or her third year in the Program. The paper must be completed by the end of the autumn quarter of the student’s third year in the Program. The paper must be approved by two Booth faculty rev. 8/2014 9 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 members, generally from the student’s dissertation area. (A student may request permission from the area advisor to have one faculty member from outside the student’s dissertation area; the other faculty member must be from the student’s dissertation area.) If the paper is approved, the student must present it in a workshop by the end of the spring quarter of the student’s third year in the program. Ideally, the curriculum paper is a preliminary work which will eventually become a student’s dissertation. The specific procedures of the Curriculum Paper are below. Some dissertation areas have additional requirements; consult the relevant dissertation area requirements and the section of this guidebook on co-authorship (Chapter 5). (1) Prior to the end of the late June deadline in the student’s second year in the Program, a student must submit a copy of the “Curriculum Paper Topic Approval Form” to the Ph.D. Office, signed by two Booth faculty members who approve the topic and agree to serve as readers of the curriculum paper. If, at any point, the student changes the topic, s/he must get faculty approval for the new topic and submit a new form to the Ph.D. Office. Finance students have an earlier deadline for this approval form due to the earlier due date for the finance paper. (2) Prior to the beginning of the autumn quarter, the student must submit an outline of the curriculum paper and a signed copy of the “Curriculum Paper Outline Approval Form” to the Ph.D. Office. Autumn quarter stipend checks will be withheld until the signed copy of the “Curriculum Paper Outline Approval Form” has been submitted to the Ph.D. Office. (3) Prior to the end of the last day of the autumn quarter of the third year, the student must submit a copy of the completed curriculum paper to the Ph.D. Office and to the two faculty readers. (4) Prior to the end of the first week of the winter quarter of the third year, the two faculty readers must read the curriculum paper and affirm that it is satisfactory. The student must submit a signed copy of the “Curriculum Paper Evaluation Form.” Winter quarter stipend checks will be withheld until the signed copy of the “Curriculum Paper Evaluation Form” has been submitted to the Ph.D. Office. (5) Students are required to present the curriculum paper in a Curriculum Paper Workshop, preferably the workshop of the student’s dissertation area, held during the winter or spring quarter. Both faculty readers must be present and sign the “Curriculum Paper Presentation Form” stating that the presentation was acceptable. (6) Students are required to upload a PDF copy of their curriculum paper to the PhD Program database (available through the portal). This copy will be accessible to other students. Failure to complete the Curriculum Paper requirement, as outlined above, will mean that the student is not making satisfactory academic progress in the Ph.D. Program. Candidacy Requirements Certification of candidacy indicates that a student has reached the advanced stage of the Ph.D. Program, permitting him/her to devote full-time attention to writing a dissertation. It is a University of Chicago requirement that eight months must elapse between admission to candidacy and conferral of the degree. The Ph.D. Program Office reviews eligibility for candidacy once each year. Students have four years from the date of matriculation in the Program in which to reach candidacy. The requirements for candidacy are the first five steps of the Ph.D. requirements: rev. 8/2014 10 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 • Successful completion of the General Examination requirements in the student’s dissertation area • Successful completion of the General Examination requirements in the student’s support area (basic discipline) • Successful completion of an approved coordinated course sequence (if required by the dissertation area) • Successful completion of the dissertation area workshop requirement • Successful completion of the Curriculum Paper requirement (including presentation in a Curriculum Paper workshop) Upon reaching candidacy, the student is ready to complete the last two tasks of the Ph.D. requirements: proposing and then defending his or her dissertation. Dissertation Proposal To gain formal approval, the student’s dissertation proposal must be presented at a seminar. At this seminar, open to all Ph.D. students and faculty members, the student has an opportunity to explain, defend, and modify the dissertation proposal. The final decision whether to permit the student to proceed with the dissertation topic is made by the dissertation committee composed of the dissertation chairperson and at least three other faculty members. The chairperson authorizes the scheduling of the dissertation proposal seminar. Please see Chapter 6 for additional details on scheduling the dissertation proposal. Once scheduled, the Ph.D. Program Office distributes a notice inviting all faculty and doctoral students to attend the seminar. This notice must be sent out no later than two weeks prior to the date of the seminar. The student must provide a copy of the entire proposal to each dissertation committee member and the Ph.D. Program Office one week before the proposal seminar. Dissertation Defense The dissertation has no prescribed length. To gain formal approval, the student’s dissertation must be presented at a dissertation defense seminar. The dissertation defense presentation may be attended by any Ph.D. student or faculty member, but final approval of the dissertation is made by the dissertation committee. Approval by the dissertation committee is required to pass the dissertation defense. The dissertation chairperson, in consultation with the dissertation committee, determines when a student is ready to schedule a dissertation defense and informs the Ph.D. Program Office which then sends out a notice announcing the defense. This notice must be sent out no later than two weeks prior to the date of the defense. Additional details on scheduling a dissertation defense are in Chapter 6. The dissertation must be submitted to the student’s dissertation committee and the Ph.D. Program Office at least one week before the dissertation defense. rev. 8/2014 11 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 CHAPTER 3 – GENERAL EXAMINATION REQUIREMENTS BY AREA This chapter presents the General Examination requirements that must be fulfilled for each dissertation area and support area. These requirements may include specific courses, research papers, research workshops, reading lists, and/or a written examination. Please review these requirements with the Ph.D. Area Advisor in your chosen dissertation and support areas. Accounting The goal of the accounting area dissertation requirements is to ensure that Ph.D. candidates in accounting have both a good understanding of the field of accounting—the basic principles of accounting as well as the field of accounting research—and sound training in the underlying disciplines of economics, statistics, econometrics, and finance. However, the program is also designed to allow students a certain level of flexibility to pursue their own interests, which may lie in these areas or may lie outside, for example in psychology, law, or sociology. Students are thus encouraged to tailor their educational experience to take advantage of the rich variety of intellectual activity that is a hallmark of the University of Chicago. Students are especially encouraged to think creatively about how accounting is linked to other fields as well as to deepen their understanding of accounting and economics. Students who enter the program with little or no academic or work experience in accounting are strongly encouraged to take two or more MBA classes in accounting (common examples being B30000, B30001, B30116, B30117, B30118, B30130) to ensure they have sufficient understanding of the accounting fundamentals that will be important for their subsequent career teaching and conducting research. Separate from these requirements, there is a strong expectation that all accounting students attend and participate in the weekly accounting research workshop. Students should also monitor other workshop series (particularly that in finance) for workshops relevant to their research interests. When fulfilling general Ph.D. degree requirements, please make sure to consult other relevant sections of the Guidebook. This includes requirements regarding completion of the curriculum paper (Chapter 2) and co-authorship (Chapter 5). The deadlines and other requirements associated with the curriculum paper in particular will be rigorously enforced. Accounting as a Dissertation Area: For students writing a dissertation in accounting, the General Exam requirements are: (1) Successful completion of the sequence of accounting seminar courses as well as necessary prerequisites. A. Accounting seminar course requirement. Students must take the following sequence of accounting seminar courses, earning an average grade of “B” (3.0) or higher: Year One: B30902: Empirical Research in Accounting (taken pass/fail) B30904: Empirical Research on Managers’ Corporate Financial Reporting Decisions (sit in (not for credit) or take P/F) Year Two: rev. 8/2014 12 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 B30901: Economic Modeling of Accounting Issues B30902: Empirical Research in Accounting (for a letter grade). B30903: Topics in Empirical Accounting Research (This class is currently taught by Professors Berger and Leuz in alternate years. Students are required to take both versions of the class, normally in their second and third years.) B30904: Empirical Research on Managers’ Corporate Financial Reporting Decisions (for a letter grade) Year Three: B30903: Topics in Empirical Accounting Research B. Prerequisite or Concurrent Registration Courses. Students must enroll in all of the following prerequisite courses, earning an average grade of “B” (3.0) or higher: B30901: E30100, E30200, B33911 B30902: B35901 B30903: B30902, B35901 B30904: B30000 or equivalent Courses taken to fulfill the dissertation area requirements may also be used to fulfill support area and coordinated sequence requirements. (2) Successful completion of first year summer paper no later than the beginning of the autumn quarter of the second year. (3) Successful completion of the coordinated sequence, a three course sequence in an area other than the dissertation and support areas, with an average grade of “B” (3.0) or higher. See below and Chapter 2. (4) Successful completion of the accounting area written General Examination. Students normally take this exam in the summer immediately following their second year in the program. (5) Successful completion of the accounting workshop participation requirement. Accounting Ph.D. students are expected to attend accounting workshops throughout 1 their studies at Chicago. The Ph.D. Program workshop requirement is met by registering for and receiving a passing grade in the accounting workshop (B30600) during each quarter of the second and third years in the Program. When registered for the workshop, students should check with the workshop coordinator at the beginning of each quarter to determine what they need to do to earn the grade of P. (6) Successful completion of any M.B.A. Program accounting courses required to complete the individual student’s knowledge of accounting (as determined by the Ph.D. Student Area Advisor in Accounting). For those students without a strong background in accounting, this would normally comprise 30000, 30116, and 30130. 1 Note that the accounting research workshop is sometimes scheduled such that it conflicts with required first year classes. If this occurs students are expected to give priority to attending their required classes. rev. 8/2014 13 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 Please refer to Chapter 2 for curriculum paper requirements. In accounting, we expect students to turn in a final curriculum paper by the end of the autumn quarter of their third year, and present the paper to the faculty in the winter quarter of the third year. Students in accounting can take a variety of support area/coordinated sequence combinations. Examples are: Support Area Coordinated Sequence Economics Econometrics & Statistics Econometrics & Statistics Economics Behavioral Science Economics Here is an example of a four-year course schedule for a Ph.D. student writing a dissertation in accounting and taking economics as a support area and econometrics/statistics as a coordinated sequence. Students with other interests will take different schedules. Year 1 in the Program: Description Autumn Winter Spring Summer Accounting B30904 B30902 Summer paper Economics/Price Theory B35903 E30100 E30200 B35908 Finance B35901 B35902 B33911 Econometrics/Statistics B41901 B41902 B41903 Year 2 in the Program: Description Autumn Winter Spring Summer B30901 Curriculum Paper, Accounting B30904 B30902 B30903 Written General Exam B33911 Economics E3xxxx B33921 Econometrics/Statistics B41910 B4191x Specialized Courses (as XXX XXX XXX needed) Area Workshop B30600 B30600 B30600 Year 3 in the Program: Description Autumn Winter Spring Summer Accounting B30903 Specialized Courses (as XXX XXX XXX needed) Area Workshop B30600 B30600 B30600 rev. 8/2014 14 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 Curriculum Paper Complete Present Dissertation Begin Continue Continue Year 4 in the Program: Description Autumn Winter Spring Summer Specialized Courses (as XXX XXX XXX needed) Dissertation Propose Continue Continue Complete Attend Area Workshop Accounting as a Coordinated Sequence: The following accounting courses can be taken to fulfill the coordinated sequence requirement: B30901, B30902, B30903, B30904 or any one of B30000, B30116, B30117, B30118, or B30130. rev. 8/2014 15 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 Behavioral Science Behavioral Science involves research on how people use information and make decisions, and how they interact with one another in doing so in dyads, groups, and organizations. Studies in this area draw on theory and research from cognitive and social psychology, economics, neuroscience, and other related fields. Behavioral Sciences applies these disciplines to the study of human behavior in a wide range of managerial contexts. Examples include cognitive processes of judgment and decision making; motivation and self-control; psychological aspects of economic behavior; learning, reasoning, and problem solving by individuals, groups, and organizations; processes of negotiation; power and influence; teamwork and group processes; and organizational decision making. Students can focus their studies on the subset of research topics that best fits their interests and career goals. Studies in Behavioral Science can be paired with studies in Marketing for a focus on consumer behavior, with Organizations and Markets for a focus on organizational structures and processes, with Economics or Finance for a focus on economic behavior, and with a variety of other scholarly fields. In addition to courses offered at Chicago Booth, students take courses in Psychology, Economics, Sociology, Public Policy, and other university departments. Students are expected to select a faculty member from the program as an advisor at the start of their studies. Though the advisor may change, it is essential that students have designated advisors at all times during their studies. When fulfilling general Ph.D. degree requirements, please make sure to consult the relevant section of the Guidebook that discusses those requirements (e.g., curriculum paper requirements in Chapter 2, co-authorship rules in Chapter 5), in addition to area specific requirements. Behavioral Science as a dissertation area. For students writing a dissertation in Behavioral Sciences, the requirements are: 1) Successful completion of courses as itemized below. In order to assure appropriate consultation, the choice of courses to satisfy requirement (B) must be approved in advance of registration by the student’s faculty advisor. The minimum grade allowed for a course to count towards the Ph.D. degree is a B (3.0) in all courses taught by primary Behavioral Science faculty members and a B– (2.7) for all other courses. A. B38901, B38902, and B38903, B38913, B38914 – any 3 from Current Topics in Behavioral Science I, II, III (and Foundations of Judgment and Decision Making, Foundations of Social Psychology): at least one in each of the first 3 years in the Program. B. Two courses in statistics. Usually B41901 and B41902, but others can be taken with permission. It is acceptable for B41901 and B41902 also to count toward fulfillment of the support area or coordinated sequence area requirements. C. Two courses in research methods including: • One in experimental design This requirement can be satisfied by one of the following: o Research Methods in Behavioral Science – B38911 o Design and Analysis of Experiments – Stat 34500 o Experimental Design I – Psych 37300 rev. 8/2014 16 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 o Experimental Design II – Psych 37900 • One in non-experimental research methods This requirement can be satisfied by one of the following (or by an alternative approved by PhD Program Advisor): o Statistical Methods of Research I & II – Soc 30004 and 30005 (in this case, both courses must be taken to satisfy the requirement) o Questionnaire Design – Psych 38600 o Survey Research Overview – Soc 30118 o Survey Research Methodology – PPHA 41600 o Survey Questionnaire Design – PPHA 41800 D. A solid introductory course in Microeconomics, Game Theory, or Behavioral Economics (e.g., B33101 “Turbo-Micro”, ECON30500 Game Theory, ECON21800 Experimental Economics, etc.). (This requirement is waived for students who choose Economics as a Support Area.) 2) Successful completion of the First-year Summer Paper no later than the beginning of the autumn quarter of the second year. 3) Successful completion of the Behavioral Science written Ph.D. Qualifying Exam. Students must take the exam during their second year in the PhD program. The exam is composed of a written test and the submission of a short research paper (a good model for the format and scope of this report is a Psychological Science article). Details of the exam are available by request from the Ph.D. Program Advisor. 4) Successful completion of the workshop participation requirement. Ph.D. students are expected and encouraged to attend all Behavioral Science Workshops throughout their studies here. The minimum requirement is attendance at 75% of all workshops offered between matriculation and the acceptance of the dissertation proposal, excluding unavoidable class conflicts and periods in which the student is away for Ph.D.-study-related business. The Behavioral Science course requirements include the following rules: (a) Generally, in the first two years of study, a student will enroll in a minimum of 3 Ph.D. courses (excluding workshops) each quarter, until his/her course requirements are fulfilled. This minimum is required to obtain financial support. Students who have a good reason to waive this requirement must obtain written permission from the Ph.D. Program Advisor at the start of each quarter in which they propose to enroll in fewer than 3 courses (unless they have completed all course requirements). (b) Students must retake any course in which they receive a grade below B–. Psychology as a support area for Behavioral Science students. Students may elect to complete the Support Area requirement in the field of Psychology (instead of the Chicago-Booth areas of Economics, Econometrics & Statistics, Management Science/Operations Management, or Organizations & Markets). To complete this requirement in Psychology, students must first complete most of the “Common Graduate Curriculum” coursework requirements in Psychology (all to be passed with grades of B– or higher): rev. 8/2014 17 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 1) Statistics Requirement (which will also “double count” to fulfill the two course “Statistics” requirement 1B and the one-course “Experimental Design” requirement 1Ci) 2) Three (of five) Psychology core courses, in areas including Biological Psychology (Psych 30300), Cognitive Psychology (Psych 30400), Developmental Psychology (Psych 30500), Social Psychology (Psych 30600), Sensation and Perception (Psych 30700); (n.b., Students do not have to complete the “Trial Research Seminar” or the “Minor Area” requirements of the Graduate Psychology curriculum.) 3) Two additional PhD level courses in any area of Psychology that fit the student’s study plan Behavioral Science as a support area. The requirements for Behavioral Sciences as a Support Area are the same as for the dissertation area, except that 1)(D) is not required; the Behavioral Sciences exam may be taken in the third year instead of the second if preferred. Behavioral Science as a coordinated sequence. The following Behavioral Science courses can be taken to fulfill the coordinated sequence requirement: any three of B38901, B38902, B38903, B38904, B38913, B38914, and Psych. 43600 – Judgment and Decision Making. Other courses can be taken with the permission of the Behavioral Science PhD Program area advisor. Joint Ph.D. Degree in Psychology and Business Students may apply to complete a joint Ph.D. degree in Psychology and Business. Students who are admitted to Booth may apply for admission to the Joint Program at any time during their first two years of study at Booth. They must secure a faculty research sponsor in Psychology (in addition to one at Booth) in order to be considered. The details of this rigorous course of study are available from the Ph.D. Program area advisor. rev. 8/2014 18 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 Econometrics & Statistics Econometrics and Statistics are concerned with the combination of economic, mathematical, and computing techniques in the analysis of economic and business problems such as forecasting, demand and cost analyses, model building, analysis of big data, and testing empirical implications of theories. Study in this area integrates a comprehensive program of course work with extensive research. The Program is designed for students who wish to do research in econometric and statistical methods that are motivated by business and economic applications. Students are able to design an individual program of study by combining courses in specific areas of business, such as economics, finance, accounting, management, marketing, or international business with advanced courses in statistical methods. When fulfilling general Ph.D. degree requirements, please make sure to consult the relevant section of the Guidebook that discusses those requirements (e.g., curriculum paper requirements in Chapter 2, co-authorship rules in Chapter 5), in addition to area specific requirements (if any). Econometrics & Statistics as a Dissertation Area: For students writing a dissertation in Econometrics & Statistics, the General Examination requirements are: (1) Successful completion of six econometrics/statistics seminar courses: A “B” (3.0) or higher grade point average must be achieved. If a student takes a course more than once, the highest grade will be used to calculate the grade point average. B41903 – Applied Econometrics B41910 – Time Series Analysis for Forecasting and Model Building B41911 – Advanced Econometrics B41912 – Applied Multivariate Analysis B41913 – Bayesian Econometrics B41914 – Multivariate Time Series Analysis E31000 – Empirical Analysis I E31100 – Empirical Analysis II E31200 – Empirical Analysis III Students may apply to the area advisor for permission to substitute courses from the Statistics and Economics departments. For example, stochastic calculus is helpful to students interested in financial econometrics. (2) Successful completion of the First-year summer paper no later than the beginning of the autumn quarter of the second year. (3) Though the coordinated sequence is no longer required (beginning only for students who matriculate in 2009 or later; students who entered the program prior to 2009 must complete the coordinated sequence), students must take an additional 3 PhD courses of their choosing (related to their dissertation area) to fulfill the course requirements for Econometrics and Statistics. (4) Research Paper Requirement: Successful completion of a research paper in Econometrics/Statistics. rev. 8/2014 19 Ph.D. Program Guidebook 2014-2015 The student is required to write a research paper in Econometrics and Statistics by the second week of the autumn quarter of the third year. The paper will be evaluated by at least two Econometric and Statistics faculty members with a pass or fail grade, and feedback will be given to the student. Normally, the student has only one chance to pass this requirement. If the student successfully passes the research paper, s/he may revise it, according to the feedback received and expand on the results for his/her curriculum paper, due at the end of autumn quarter. The curriculum paper presentation requirement in a seminar during winter quarter must be fulfilled for Econometrics/Statistics students by presenting their E/S-Curriculum Paper in the Econometrics/Statistics Colloquium during winter quarter of the student’s third year. The oral presentation will be judged by faculty with a pass or fail grade. The Econometrics and Statistics course requirements include the following rules: (a) Generally a student will enroll in a minimum of 3 Ph.D. courses each quarter in their first two years of study (this includes workshops in the second year of study). This minimum is generally required to obtain full financial support. (b) A minimum grade of B- (2.7) is required in all courses. Students must automatically retake any course in which they receive a grade of C+ or below. Following is an example of a four-year course schedule for a Ph.D. student writing a dissertation in Econometrics and Statistics, with economics as a support area, and finance as a coordinated sequence or an application area: Year 1 in the Program: Description Autumn Winter Spring Summer st Econometrics/Statistics B41903 B41910 B41912 Optional 1 -year paper Price Theory E30100 E30200 B30300 Specialized Courses XXX XXX XXX Year 2 in the Program: Description Autumn Winter Spring Summer Econometrics/Statistics E31000 E31100 E31200 Curriculum Paper Finance B35901 B35902 B35903 Specialized Courses (as XXX XXX XXX needed) Area Workshop B41600 B41600 B41600 Year 3 in the Program: Description Autumn Winter Spring Summer Specialized Courses (as XXX XXX XXX needed) Area Workshop B41600 B41600 B41600 Curriculum Paper Complete Present Dissertation Begin Continue Continue rev. 8/2014 20