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STORY WRITING FUN GUIDE

STORY WRITING FUN GUIDE 11
Activities provided to you by: STORY WRITING FUN GUIDE Get inspired to create your very own written work of art! The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of the Public Broadcasting Service and is used with permission. • © Highlights for Children, Inc.BRAINSTORMING is a way to come up with new and different ideas. Use those ideas to write a GREAT STORY! Brainstorming Activity Use these activity pages to start your story. Write down or draw whatever ideas you have. Story Structure All stories have a beginning, middle and an end. Write down or draw how you want the story to start, what happens during the story, and how will it end. Beginning End Middle Activities provided to you by: For more information and how to enter visit: pbskids.org/read The Cat In The Hat Knows A Lot About That! TM & © 2014 Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P. All rights reserved. • © Scholastic Entertainment Inc. WORDGIRL is a registered trademark of Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved. • The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of the Public Broadcasting Service and is used with permission. • © Highlights for Children, Inc.Main Character The person, animal or thing that your story is about. Create a list of different characters you want in your story and describe them. (Spike the dog is fluffy, Aunt Sally always wears funny clothes.) Description Character Setting Where your story takes place. Create a list of different places (the zoo, the moon) and choose whether it’s the past, present or future (last year, next Tuesday). Think about how the setting might affect your character (the snow made it cold). Setting Activities provided to you by: For more information and how to enter visit: pbskids.org/read © 2014 WGBH Educational Foundation. TM © “Martha” and underlying artwork: Susan Meddaugh. • © Scholastic Entertainment Inc. WORDGIRL is a registered trademark of Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved. The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of the Public Broadcasting Service and is used with permission. • © Highlights for Children, Inc.Problem & Resolution The challenge your character(s) face and how they overcome it. Create a list of problems (passing a math quiz, fighting an evil villain). Then in a separate list create ways to solve the problem. Choose your favorite scenarios and circle them. Problem Resolution All that brainstorming has paid off! You now have a basic plan. Turn the page over and use the space to start your story. Have fun! Activities provided to you by: For more information and how to enter visit: pbskids.org/read Arthur character registered trademark and © 2014 Marc Brown. WGBH/Cookie Jar Entertainment Inc. The Cat In The Hat Knows A Lot About That! TM & © 2014 Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P. All rights reserved. The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of the Public Broadcasting Service and is used with permission. • © Highlights for Children, Inc.Let the story writing begin! Use this space to write your story Story running long? Grab another sheet of paper! Activities provided to you by: For more information and how to enter visit: pbskids.org/read Arthur character registered trademark and © 2014 Marc Brown. WGBH/Cookie Jar Entertainment Inc. • © 2014 WGBH Educational Foundation. TM © “Martha” and underlying artwork: Susan Meddaugh. The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of the Public Broadcasting Service and is used with permission. • © Highlights for Children, Inc.Write This! Write a caption for the picture below. Then either draw your own or cut and paste pictures into the empty boxes. Then write a caption for each picture. It’s a happy, sunny day! (Write your own caption here.) Activities provided to you by: For more information and how to enter visit: pbskids.org/read Arthur character registered trademark and © 2014 Marc Brown. WGBH/Cookie Jar Entertainment Inc. • The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of the Public Broadcasting Service and is used with permission. • © Highlights for Children, Inc.Story Revision Checklist Read your story out loud. Then ask yourself each of these questions. If the answer is yes, check it off on the checklist! Does my story have a beginning, middle, and end? My story is organized! Does my story answer my reader’s questions My story is developed! about what happened? Does my story include enough information? My story is detailed! Does my story use clear and specific words? My story has good vocabulary! Do my sentences make sense when I read My story has good them out loud? sentence structure! Did I check my story for correct spelling, My story is proofread! punctuation, and capitalization? Activities provided to you by: For more information and how to enter visit: pbskids.org/read © 2014 Kratt Brothers Co/9 Story Entertainment. • © Scholastic Entertainment Inc. WORDGIRL is a registered trademark of Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved. The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of the Public Broadcasting Service and is used with permission. • © Highlights for Children, Inc. Parody Play By Beverly McLoughland Play with these ideas, and get your Rewrite a song from someone else’s point of view. For example, writing rolling! imagine “The Twelve Days of Christmas” sung by a dog. What gifts would the dog receive? We’ve started the song below. Can you Character Rap finish it? By Susan O. Morelli With a partner, decide on two characters who are going to have a On the first day of Christmas, conversation. Maybe your characters will be Abraham Lincoln and My human gave to me George Washington, Goldilocks and one of the three bears, or a lion A doghouse with a flat-screen TV. and hippo who both want to drink from the same watering hole. One of you starts the conversation on paper, writing a sentence as On the second day of Christmas, one of the characters. The other person writes a response as the second My human gave to me character. Keep going, back and forth, until you have written for about Two tasty bones and 10 minutes. Then read your script like a A doghouse with a flat-screen TV. play, with each person reading his or her character’s part. Fable-Able Photo Poems By D.A. Woodliff By Beverly McLoughland Do you know the story “The Tortoise and the Hare,” with the lesson Write a poem that makes a “Slow and steady wins the race”? It was written more than 2,000 years favorite photo come to life. Your ago by Aesop, a Greek fable-teller, called a fabulist. poem can be silly or thoughtful, Now it’s your turn to be a fabulous fabulist! Write your own fable with true-to-life or outrageous. If you a moral or lesson, using animals as the characters. Will they include a do this for a few photos, you can brave lion? A sly fox? A strong ox? A proud peacock? It’s up to you! make them into a book. Activities provided to you by: For more information and how to enter visit: pbskids.org/read Write Now! Art by Stacy Curtis The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of the Public Broadcasting Service and is used with permission. • © Highlights for Children, Inc. - u l s U F ny Fod p n Get ready to laugh with these paper-passing games! Character Hilarious Headlines (for three or more people) Creations (for two or more people) By Chelsea Ottman Rak By Rosanne Lindsay Give each person a sheet of paper and a pencil. I learned this activity Each player thinks up from my Hungarian mother, an imaginary newspaper who learned it as a child. headline and writes it at the She called it Kis Ember top of his or her paper. (keesh EHM-behr), which is Players pass the Hungarian for “Little Man.” papers to the person on Give each person a strip their right so that of paper (about 3 inches by everyone gets someone 11 inches) and markers. else’s headline. Just Each player thinks of a below the headline character, then draws the players receive, they character’s head and neck at the draw a picture to top of his or her paper. The player illustrate it, then fold then folds back the paper, leaving back the headline so only the neck visible, and passes that just the picture the folded paper to the person on shows. Again, they pass the right. the papers to the right. Each player draws his or her Players write a new headline to go with the own character’s body, from neck to picture they receive, then fold back the picture waist, on the paper he or she has so that just the new headline received without looking at what shows. They pass the papers was drawn again. before. Folding back the Play continues until paper to leave just the waist everyone has written or visible, each player passes drawn on each paper. the paper to the right. Then unfold the papers Players continue drawing and share the silliness. one section of their character at a time (waist to knees, knees to feet), then folding and passing the papers. After the final pass, they Art by David Helton. open the completed drawings to reveal the mixed-up, one-of-a-kind characters. Activities provided to you by: For more information and how to enter visit: pbskids.org/read The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of the Public Broadcasting Service and is used with permission. • © Highlights for Children, Inc. i i r S Use cards as idea-starters for creating drawings or poems. Play charades with the deck. (Silently act out the picture while others try to guess.) Spread the cards faceup, and choose one on each turn. p n y y l a t By Jean Kuhn Art by Tom Nick Cocotos Player 2 then flips the top card Weave outrageous tales with in his pile to continue the story. For example, if the card shows a the help of a “story card” deck. polar bear, he might say, “The wind picked up, and I To Play was carried to the North Deal an equal number of cards Pole. Luckily a polar bear was to each player. Each person keeps out for a drive in his his or her cards facedown in a pile. convertible, and I landed in The first person flips over her top the passenger seat.” card and begins a story by saying The next player flips a card, something related to the picture. and on the story goes. The object For example, if the card shows a is to weave a tale for everyone to parachute, she might say, enjoy. “Last summer, I went When you’re finished with one parachuting for the first time story, shuffle the cards and play in my life. But suddenly . . .” again! Players get just 30 seconds per turn. More Ways to Play! Activities provided to you by: For more information and how to enter visit: pbskids.org/read o S l Make a deck with verbs instead of pictures. S To Make the Cards 1. W ith a parent’s permission, cut out pictures from old magazines and catalogs. 2. Glue each picture onto an index card. Make at least 20 cards. The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of the Public Broadcasting Service and is used with permission. • © Highlights for Children, Inc. You Finish the Story! We came up with this story beginning. We want you to write an ending for it! Art by Paula J. Becker. The Tale of the Five-Nosed Monster A storm raged outside. For a fraction of a second, BA-BOOM! lightning revealed a figure in the Mindy and Jamal shuddered as living-room window. It looked just thunder shook their home. like a monster with five noses. Jamal gasped, and Mindy “When are Mom and Dad coming screamed. back?” asked Mindy. Just then . . . “Soon,” said Jamal. “They’re just checking on Mrs. Horn. Don’t worry.” CRACK! What do you think will happen next? Finish the story! Activities provided to you by: For more information and how to enter visit: pbskids.org/read The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of the Public Broadcasting Service and is used with permission. • © Highlights for Children, Inc.
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