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Why Reading is important Funny

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Reading is Funny Motivating Kids to Read with Riddles Dee AndersonDee Anderson, who earned her MLS from the University of Iowa, has worked in public and school libraries since high school and has enjoyed reading and riddles for as long as she can remember. Teacher requests prompted her to start a riddle file years ago. Anderson has imple- mented activities in this book with children in libraries, after-school programs, and enrichment classes for the gifted. She has also presented at workshops and conferences for teachers and par- ents. She wrote Amazingly Easy Puppet Plays (American Library Association, 1997) and provided children’s activities for four publications of the Colonel Davenport Historical Foundation. Since 2000 a local newspaper has run her monthly column on children’s books and reading. Anderson currently works at the Rock Island Primary Academy in Rock Island, Illinois. While extensive effort has gone into ensuring the reliability of information appearing in this book, the publisher makes no warranty, express or implied, on the accuracy or reliability of the information, and does not assume and hereby disclaims any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions in this publication. The paper used in this publication meets the minimum requirements of American National Standard for Information Sciences—Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials, ANSI Z39.48-1992. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Anderson, Dee. Reading is funny : motivating kids to read with riddles / Dee Anderson. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN-13: 978-0-8389-0957-7 (alk. paper) 1. School libraries—Activity programs—United States. 2. Riddles, Juvenile. 3. Humor in education. 4. Reading promotion—United States. I. Title. Z675.S3A53 2009 027.80973—dc22 2008000980 Copyright © 2009 by the American Library Association. All rights reserved except those which may be granted by Sections 107 and 108 of the Copyright Revision Act of 1976. ISBN-13: 978-0-8389-0957-7 Printed in the United States of America 13 12 11 10 09 5 4 3 2 1Contents Acknowledgments xi introduction 1 PART ONE Ways to share riddles With Children 1 Bulletin Boards that Promote reading 11 For All Boards 11 Bulletin Boards for Any time 12 seasonal Bulletin Boards 14 interactive Bulletin Boards 15 2 encouraging Children to share riddles 19 daily Announcements 19 illustrated riddles 20 “mini Ha-Ha’s” 20 riddle Jar 22 ways to use children’s riddles 23 3 Games to Play with riddles 25 Quiet games 25 Active games 28 games that teach library skills 31 4 Using riddles for Public relations 35 distribute Bookmarks through Places Families Visit 35 informational Booths at community events 36 5 sharing riddles through Puppets 39 make Puppets with children 39 Ask riddles with Puppets 40 Present skits with Puppets 40 vcontents vi 6 do it yourself how to Make Up riddles and Keep a riddle File 43 creating spin-offs 43 making up new riddles 44 making up riddles with children 46 keeping a riddle File 47 PART TWO the riddles 7 laugh lines: riddles about literacy 51 Authors 51 Books 53 computer searches 57 illustrators 58 libraries 58 magazines 59 newspapers 59 Poetry 60 r eading 60 8 laughing at “our-shelves”: riddles about specific Books 63 Any Book about an invisible character 63 Any Book that’s Also a movie 63 Any giant story 63 Any spy story 64 dr. seuss Books 64 easies 67 Fairy tales and Folktales 73 Fiction 79 mystery series 85 nonfiction 86 nursery rhymes 87 9 the loony library: riddles for loony library Bulletin Boards and Games 91 10 Merry Menagerie: riddles about animals and Zoos 97 generic Animal riddles 97 Birds 98 creepy crawlies 98contents vii dinosaurs and Pterodactyls 101 dragons 102 Pets 102 wild Animals 107 Zoos 117 11 “‘hoppy’ Birthday” riddles about Birthdays 119 Birthdays in general 119 Birthday cards and greetings 119 Planning the Party 120 Before the Party 120 Party games 121 entertainment 121 drinks 122 cake 122 ice cream 123 other kinds of r efreshments 124 Presents 124 After the Party 125 12 Frightfully Funny: riddles about Creepy Creatures 126 ghosts 126 mummies 127 Vampires 128 werewolves 128 witches 129 13 “‘hoppy’ holidays” riddles about holidays and seasons 130 new Year’s day 130 chinese new Year 130 groundhog day 131 Valentine’s day 131 l eap day 132 dr. seuss’s Birthday 132 st. Patrick’s day 132 spring 133 April Fools’ day 133 easter 134 national library week 135 d.e.A.r. day 135contents viii children’s Book week 135 summer 135 Fourth of July 136 Harry Potter’s Birthday 137 library c ard sign-up month 137 Fall 137 Halloween 138 thanksgiving 138 Hanukkah 139 winter 139 christmas 140 kwanzaa 142 new Year’s eve 142 14 Fun(ny) and Games: riddles about sports 143 Any sport 143 Baseball 144 Basketball 145 Boxing 145 car r acing and demolition derby 146 dogsled r acing 146 Football 146 gymnastics 147 ice Hockey and skating 147 in-line skating 147 martial Arts 147 skateboarding 148 snowboarding 148 soccer 148 swimming 148 15 talking turnips: riddles for talking turnip Bulletin Boards, Games, and story 149 Animals 149 Around the House 150 cars 151 clothes 151 Food and drinks 152 sports 152contents ix 16 odds and ends: riddles about Popular subjects 154 Ballet 154 circuses 154 eggs 155 Pirates 157 r ain 157 snow 158 space 159 superheroes 161 Appendix A Folktale and Puppet skits 163 Appendix B recommended riddle Books 175 Appendix C reproducibles and samples 181 index 211 Appendix c is also available on the book’s website: www.ala.org/editions/extras/Anderson09577.introduction Why do skeletons read riddle books? to tickle their funny bones eiGht reasons to share riddles With Children Why should librarians, teachers, and other adults who work with children share riddles with them? There are eight great reasons to share riddles with children. 1. to tickle their Funny Bones The ability to laugh brightens our days and helps us keep going, because laughter almost immediately relaxes the brain, relieves stress, and releases endorphins that make us feel good. Recently, a crying child cheered up when I read him riddles. When the teacher in charge of our school’s malfunction- ing photocopiers sent everyone an e-mail about their proper use, I replied with riddles about Xerox machines. Immediately she responded: “Thanks. I needed some comic relief.” Because a sense of humor makes life more bearable, shouldn’t we help the children in our lives develop this valuable coping skill? 2. to tickle their Brains Riddles aren’t just good for laughs, however. They provide excellent mental exercise as well. By the age of six or seven, children have developed what Swiss psychologist Jean Piaget called “concrete operational thinking.” Because playing with different meanings of words is fun, riddles motivate kids to work out their new intellectual skill. Riddles are a wonderful (and fun) way for children to understand that words can have more than one meaning. I think it teaches them to be more flexible with the language and to try and think about those multiple-meaning words in a different context. Riddles are also a good 1introduction 2 way to teach inference, using clues to determine a specific answer. (Malia Sullivan, speech language therapist) Riddles increase background knowledge, enhance deductive and induc- tive thinking skills, and improve visual imaging needed for better read- ing skills. Most importantly, short readings for short attention spans tickle the brain’s development and galvanize a love of reading. (Dee Robbins, reading teacher) 3. to expand their Vocabularies Children might not know all the words in riddles, but they’ll want to learn them to get the jokes. Looking up unfamiliar words in a dictionary or hear- ing definitions from adults helps kids develop the vocabulary necessary for reading comprehension. Children can’t possibly understand what they read or hear if they don’t know what the words mean. (Just think how much trouble you have making sense out of anything loaded with medical terms or technical jargon.) Riddles help children increase their background knowl- edge as well, which also fosters comprehension. 4. to help them l earn to r ead We all do more of what gives us pleasure. A college instructor enjoyed Ben- nett Cerf’s Riddle-De-Dee so much when she was a child that unfamiliar concepts and vocabulary didn’t faze her. She simply asked her grandmother about them, thereby learning to read in the process. A Title I teacher reported with pleasure that one of her reluctant students read more after discovering the joy of riddle books. A mother wrote Family Fun magazine that she once tucked notes into her son’s lunch to encourage him to read. When he threw her missives away without even a glance, she started slip- ping riddles in with his sandwiches. This worked Because her son enjoyed the riddles, he reread them to classmates throughout the day. Rereading the same material repeatedly helps children improve their fluency. Timothy V. Rasinski, a reading expert who wrote The Fluent Reader, advocates that all reading must have a purpose. Savoring the pleasure of making others laugh certainly provides a purpose for reading. Score another point for riddles 5. to Give Children a sense of Mastery The triumph of being one up on those not in the know provides another purpose for reading. Sharing riddles lets children have all the answers for a change. It allows them to fool other people—even grown-ups. Wow What introduction 3 a heady switch from feeling that everyone else knows more than you do and from always being told what to do 6. to Bond with Children Sharing laughs helps people feel closer. 7. to Make Visiting the library Fun Reading and hearing riddles make trips to the library fun. Anticipating them before the actual visit can make children eager to walk through your doors. 8. to improve your image and their Perception of r eading Showing your playful side helps dispel those “dragon lady” stereotypes that persist about librarians. Positive feelings about people who love reading might help foster good feelings about the act of reading itself. When chil- dren learn that the riddle they laughed at came from a book, they see that opening book covers opens up worlds of fun. siMPle Ways to start sharinG riddles A few tips will help you and the children get more fun out of riddles. Some riddles work best when you share them in writing: What prehistoric reptiles were black-and-blue? “dino-sores” Other riddles are more suitable for sharing orally: If April showers bring May flowers, what do May flowers bring? Pilgrims Delivering punch lines with vocal expression and appropriate gestures enhances their humor. For example, say “pew” distastefully while holding your nose with one hand and waving your other hand in front of you when sharing the following riddle. What did Christopher Robin call his pet skunk? Winnie-the-“Pew” Pretend to shiver during the punch line to this next riddle. What do you call your Thanksgiving turkey when it’s still in the freezer? a “brrr-d”index “The Arabian Nights,” 74 A Artful Antics (Donahue), 177 Abiyoyo (Seeger), 73 Arthur series (Hoban), 67 activities Arthur’s Chicken Pox (Brown), 68 Can You Fill In the Blanks? 17, 107, Asch, Frank, 72 190, 197 astronauts, 159–160 Crack the Code 6, 18, 27–28, 37, astronomers, 160 193–194, 197 athletes, 13 Who Said That? 6, 17, 27, 191, 197 atlases, 56 Who Wrote That? 6, 16, 27, 192, 197 authors Why Should You Go to the Library? 17, mystery riddles, 86 37, 195–196 pretend, 91–95 Adler, David A., 86 riddles about literacy, 51–53 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Twain), 79 autobiographies, 54 The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Twain), 79 Agent A to Agent Z (Rash), 67 B Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (Viorst), 67 “Baa, Baa, Black Sheep,” 87 Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (Carroll), 80 Babbitt, Natalie, 84 aliens (space), 159 Babe and Me (Gutman), 80 alligators, 107 Babe: The Gallant Pig (King-Smith), 80 Alphabet Soup (Dahl), 176 ballet, 154 Amazingly Easy Puppet Plays (Anderson), 42, Barrett, Judi, 68 178 Barrie, James M., 83–84 amphibians, 98 Bartholomew and the Oobleck (Seuss), 64 anagrams, 30, 46 baseball, 144–145 Anansi and the Talking Melon (Kimmel), 73 basketball, 145 And the Dish Ran Away with the Spoon bats (animals), 107–108 (Stevens and Crummel), 67 Baum, L. Frank, 85 And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry bears, 108 Street (Seuss), 64 Beastly Laughs (Moore), 177 Anderson, Dee, 42, 178 “Beauty and the Beast,” 74 Animal Jokes (Rosenberg), 177 beavers, 108 Animal Quack-Ups (Dahl), 176 bees, 99 animals, 97–117 Bemelmans, Ludwig, 71 bulletin boards for any time, 13 Ben and Me (Lawson), 80 riddles about specific books, 64, 69 Berenstain Bears series (Berenstain), 68 with spots, 98, 112 Berenstain, Stan and Jan, 68 Talking Turnips, 149–150 Bernstein, Joanne E., 30, 46, 178 that hop, 97, 110, 111, 114 Biggest Riddle Book in the World See also specific animals (Rosenbloom), 178 Anne of Green Gables (Montgomery), 80 birds, 98, 102–103 antelopes, 107 birthdays, 119–125 ANTics (Hepworth), 178 book care ants, 99 bulletin boards for any time, 12 April (month), 14 riddles about literacy, 54–55 April Fools’ Day, 133–134 riddles about specific books, 70 211index 212 book jackets, 12–13, 16 Carle, Eric, 71 D book reviews, 55 Carroll, Lewis, 80 Dadey, Debbie, 85 bookmarks cars, 151 Dahl, Michael, 176 creating, 24 The Cat in the Hat (Seuss), 64–65 Dahl, Roald, 80 distributing, 35 catalogs, 34 daily announcements, 19 jester, 105 caterpillars, 99 D.E.A.R. Day, 135 pet, 104, 105, 107 cats, 103–104 Decode Secret Messages, 37 reproducibles/samples, 198–205 Cerf, Bennett, 2, 176, 178 deer, 109 books, 63–87 A Chair for My Mother (Williams), 68 demolition derby, 146 bookworms, 101 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory dePaola, Tomie, 71–72, 74, 76, 78 boxing, 145–146 (Dahl), 80 Dickens, Charles, 81 Brett, Jan, 70 Charlotte’s Web (White), 80 dictionaries, 56–57, 101 Brown, Jeff, 81 cheetahs, 108 dinosaurs, 101–102, 114 Brown, Marc, 68, 176 Chewy Chuckles (Dahl), 176 dish and spoon puppets for Mother Brown, Margaret Wise, 69 “Chicken Little,” 74 Goose riddles, 40 bulletin boards children sharing riddles Doctor Dolittle series (Lofting), 81 for all boards, 11–12 daily announcements, 19 Dog Breath The Horrible Trouble with animals, 13 illustrated riddles, 20 Hally Tosis (Pilkey), 69 for any time, 12–13 making up riddles, 46 dogs, 104–105 book care, 12 mini ha-ha’s, 20–21 dogsled racing, 146 book jackets, 12–13 riddle jar, 22–23 dolphins, 109 interactive, 13, 16–18 using children’s riddles, 23–24 Donahue, Jill, 177 Loony Library, 6, 16, 91–96 Children’s Book Week, 32, 135 Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Stevenson), mysteries, 13 chimpanzees, 109 81 patterns for cutouts, 182–183 Chinese New Year, 130–131 Dr. Seuss books, 64–67 people, 13 Chitchat Chuckles (Ziegler), 177 Dr. Seuss’s birthday, 32, 64, 132 seasonal, 14–15 Chocolate, Deborah M. Newton, Dracula (Stoker), 81 sharing riddles, 24 26, 178 dragons, 102 space, 13 Christmas, 15, 140–142, 154 Duck for President (Cronin), 69 sports, 13 A Christmas Carol (Dickens), 81 Talking Turnips, 5–6, 13, 17, The Chronicles of Narnia (Lewis), 81 E 149–153 Chrysanthemum (Henkes), 68 Burns, Marilyn, 30, 46, 178 easies, 67–73 “Cinderella,” 74 Burroughs, Edgar Rice, 84 Easter, 14, 134–135, 157 circuses, 69, 71, 114, 154–155 Burton, Virginia Lee, 71 Egg Hunt game, 6, 29 Cleary, Beverly, 84 butterflies, 99 eggs, 88, 155–157 clothes, 151 Byars, Betsy, 81 Eight Ate (Terban), 31, 178 Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs Eisenberg, Lisa, 175 (Barrett), 68 elephants, 109 C Cole, Joanna, 86–87, 176 Eloise series (Knight), 69 community events, 36–38 cake, birthday, 122–123 “The Emperor’s New Clothes,” 74 computer searches, 57–58 Calhoun, Mary, 70 encyclopedias, 57 Corduroy (Freeman), 68 call numbers, 31, 33–34 Ernst, Lisa Campbell, 69, 73 Crack the Code 6, 18, 27–28, 37, Cam Jensen series (Adler), 86 193–194, 197 camels, 108 Cracker Jackson (Byars), 81 F Can You Fill In the Blanks? 17, 107, Creepy Crawlers (Moore), 177 190, 197 fairy tales and folktales, 73–79. See creepy crawlies, 98–101 canaries, 102–103 also Talking Turnips creepy creatures, 126–129 Cannon, Janell, 72 fall (season), 13–14, 122, 137–138 The Cricket in Times Square (Selden), Caps for Sale (Slobodkina), 68 “The Farmer in the Dell,” 69 81 car racing, 146 ferrets, 105 Critter Jitters (Ziegler), 177 card games fiction, 79–85 crocodiles, 107, 109 Loony Library, 26–27, 187–189 Fiddle With a Riddle (Bernstein), 30, Cronin, Doreen, 69 Riddle Roundup, 6, 27 46, 178 Talking Turnips, 5–6, 26, Crummel, Susan Stevens, 67 Fin M’Coul (dePaola), 74 184–186 Curious George series (Rey), 68, 112 Find Your Partner game, 6, 28–29index 213 ghosts, 14, 126–127, 129 Hoban, Russell, 69 fireflies, 99–100 Holiday Jokes (Rosenberg), 177 fish, 98, 105, 109–110 giants, 63–64, 76, 109 holidays, 14, 16, 130–142 “The Fisherman and His Wife,” 75 Giggle Bubbles (Ziegler), 177 homophones, 31, 44 The Five Hundred Hats of Bartholomew Ginger Jumps (Ernst), 69 Hooway for Wodney Wat (Lester), 70 Cubbins (Seuss), 65 “The Gingerbread Man,” 75 horses, 105–106 Flat Stanley (Brown), 81 giraffes, 111 Horsfall, Jacqueline, 177, 178 The Fluent Reader (Rasinki), 178 “Goldilocks and the Three Bears,” Horton Hatches the Egg (Seuss), 65 Fluffy series (McMullan), 69 75 Horton Hears a Who (Seuss), 65 folktales. See fairy tales and folktales Goodnight Moon (Brown), 69 Hot Fudge (Howe), 70 food and drinks Goofballs (Ziegler), 177 Hot Potato, 6, 29 birthday riddles, 122–124 Goosebumps series (Stine), 82 Hot-Air Henry (Calhoun), 70 eggs, 88, 155–157 gorillas, 111 How Do You Get There? (Donahue), Talking Turnips, 152 Grambs, Alison, 178 177 Green Eggs and Ham (Seuss), 65 football, 146, 148 How the Grinch Stole Christmas Fourth of July, 136–137 Gregory, the Terrible Eater (Sharmat), (Seuss), 65–66 Fox in Socks (Seuss), 65 69 How to Eat Fried Worms (Rockwell), Fox, Lori Miller, 178 Groundhog Day, 111, 131 82 foxes, 110 groundhogs, 111 Howe, James, 70, 72 Frances series (Hoban), 69 Gruelle, Johnny, 84 A Huge Hog Is a Big Pig (McCall), Frankenstein (Shelley), 81–82 guinea pigs, 105 30, 46, 178 Guinness World Records, 86 Freeman, Don, 68 Humphrey, the Lost Whale (Tokuda), Frog and Toad series (Lobel), 69 Gutman, Dan, 80 86 “The Frog Prince,” 75, 110 gymnastics, 147 “Humpty Dumpty,” 87–88 frogs and toads, 69, 75, 110, 116 The Hundred and One Dalmatians Funny Riddles (Horsfall), 177 H (Smith), 82–83 Funny Side Up (Thaler), 46, 178 Ha Ha Ha 1000+ Jokes, Riddles, hyenas, 111 Funny You Should Ask (Terban), 46, Facts, and More (Thomas), 178 178 Hall, Katy, 175 I Halloween, 14, 138. See also “The “I Know an Old Lady Who G Ghost Bridge” Swallowed a Fly,” 70 Galactic Giggles (Dahl), 176 hamsters, 105 ice cream, 123–124 Game-Day Gigglers (Schultz), 177 “Hansel and Gretel,” 75 ice hockey, 147 games to play Hanukkah, 139 idioms, 44 birthday game riddles, 121 Harry Potter series (Rowling), 82, illustrated riddles, 20 card games, 26–27 129, 137 illustrators, 58 Crack the Code 6, 18, 27–28 Harry the Dirty Dog (Zion), 70 imaginary books, 91–95 Egg Hunt, 6, 29 Harry’s Dog (Porte), 70 Imogene’s Antlers (Small), 70 Find Your Partner, 6, 28–29 The Hat (Brett), 70 informational booths at community Get It Together, 6, 28 Hatchet (Paulsen), 82 events, 36–38 Loony Library, 28–29, 187–189 “The Headless Horseman.” See in-line skating, 147 Loony Library Book Hunt, 6, “The Legend of Sleepy interactive bulletin boards 33–34 Hollow” Loony Library, 16 Pass It On, 29–30 Heidi (Spyri), 82 mystery word, 17–18 quiet games, 25–26 Henkes, Kevin, 68, 72 picture matching, 13, 17 Riddle Roundup, 6, 27 Henry and Mudge series (Rylant), 70 secret messages, 18 Talking Turnips, 5–6, 26, 28–29, Hepworth, Cathi, 178 Talking Turnips, 17 184–186 “Hey, Diddle, Diddle,” 87 invisible characters, 63 that teach library skills, 31–34 “Hickory, Dickory, Dock,” 87 Irving, Washington, 83, 84 Toll-Bridge Troll, 6, 30–31, 46 Highlights magazine, 19, 179 Itching and Twitching (McKissack), 75 Who Said That? 6, 17, 27 The Hink Pink Book (Burns), 30, 46, “The Itsy Bitsy Spider,” 70 Who Wrote That? 6, 16, 27 178 “Georgie Porgie,” 87 hink pinks, 30, 46, 178 J Get It Together game, 6, 28 hippos, 111 Historical Jokes (Rosenberg), 177 “The Ghost Bridge” (puppet skit), “Jack and Jill,” 88 30, 42, 165–169 Hoban, Lillian, 67–68 “Jack and the Beanstalk,” 76index 214 “Little Red Riding Hood,” 76 “Jack Be Nimble,” 88 Moss, Marissa, 80 “Jack Sprat,” 88 The Littles series (Petersen), 83 Most, Bernard, 178 Jamie O’Rourke and the Big Potato Lobel, Arnold, 28, 69 Mother Goose, 40, 87 (dePaola), 76 Lofting, Hugh, 81 movies, books that are also, 63, 69 Joke and Riddle Ballyhoo (Horsfall), Loony Library Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH 178 bulletin boards, 6, 16, 91–96 (O’Brien), 83 games to play, 26–29, 33–34, mummies, 127–128 Jones, Marcia Thornton, 85 187–189 Mutts (McDonnell), 45 Judy Moody Saves the World The Lorax (Seuss), 66 mysteries, 13, 85–86 (McDonald), 83 mystery words, 17–18 Junie B. Jones series (Park), 83 The Lord of the Rings trilogy (Tolkien), 83 Lunchbox Laughs (Ziegler), 177 N K Nancy Drew series (Keene), 86 kangaroos, 111 M Nate the Great series (Sharmat), 86 Kasza, Keiko, 73 National Library Week, 32, 135 Madeline series (Bemelmans), 71 Kat Kong (Pilkey), 70 Naylor, Phyllis Reynolds, 84 magazines, 59 Keene, Carolyn, 86 New Year’s Day, 130 The Magic School Bus series (Cole), Kimmel, Eric A., 73 New Year’s Eve, 142 86–87 King Arthur, 76 newsletters, 24 Magic Tree House series (Osborne), King-Smith, Dick, 80 newspapers, 24, 59–60 83 Knight, Hilary, 69 nonfiction, 86–87 Magical Mischief (Walton), 177 koalas, 111 nursery rhymes, 87–90 making up riddles Kwanzaa, 142 Nutty Names (Ziegler), 177 with children, 46 creating spin-offs, 43–44 L keeping a riddle file, 47 O ladybugs, 100 new riddles, 44–46 O’Brien, Robert C., 83 Laughs on a Leash (Dahl), 176 mammals, 98 ocean animals, 107 Lawson, Robert, 80 Martha series (Meddaugh), 71 O’Connor, Jane, 72 Leaf, Munro, 72–73 martial arts, 147–148 octopuses, 112–113 Leap Day, 132 “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” 89 Officer Buckle and Gloria (Rathmann), “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” “Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary,” 89 71 (Irving), 83 McCall, Francis X., 30, 46, 178 Oh, the Places You’ll Go (Seuss), 66 leopards, 111 McCully, Emily Arnold, 71 “Old King Cole,” 89 leprechauns, 83 McDonald, Megan, 83 “Old Mother Hubbard,” 89 Lester, Helen, 70 McDonnell, Patrick, 45 “Old Woman Who Lived in a Let the Fun Begin (Peterson et al.), McElligot’s Pool (Seuss), 66 Shoe,” 89–90 177 McKissack, Patricia C., 75 Oliver Button Is a Sissy (dePaola), Lewis, C. S., 81 McMullan, Kate, 69 71–72 libraries Meddaugh, Susan, 71 Osborne, Mary Pope, 83 animal riddles, 101 meteors, 160 otters, 113 games that teach library skills, mice, 106, 112 outer space, 160 31–34 Miggs and Jiggs, 28, 40–41, 169–174 Library Card Sign-Up Month, Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel P 137 (Burton), 71 riddles about literacy, 58–59 Milky Way, 160 paper bag puppets, 36–37, 40, Library Card Sign-Up Month, 137 Milne, A. A., 85 206–209 lions, 111–112 Mini Ha-Ha’s, 20–21 Park, Barbara, 83 literacy, riddles about, 51–62 Mirette on the High Wire (McCully), parrots, 103 “Little Bo Peep,” 88 71 Pass It On game, 29–30 “Little Boy Blue,” 88–89 The Mixed-Up Chameleon (Carle), 71 pattern riddles, 46 The Little Engine That Could (Piper), monkeys, 112 “Paul Bunyan,” 77 71 Monster Laughs (Dahl), 176 Paulsen, Gary, 82 Little House series (Wilder), 83 Montgomery, L. M., 80 people, bulletin boards for any time, “Little Jack Horner,” 89 moon, 160 13 “Little Miss Muffet,” 89, 90 Peter Pan (Barrie), 83–84 Moore, Mark, 177 “The Little Red Hen,” 76 “Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater,” 90 Mooser, Stephen, 175index 215 Petersen, John, 83 Rasinski, Timothy V., 2, 178 Shelley, Mary, 81–82 Peterson, Scott K., 177 Rathmann, Peggy, 71 Shiloh (Naylor), 84 pets, 102–107 rats, 114 “The Shoemaker and the Elves,” 78 Pfeffer, Susan Beth, 175 Read a Riddle, 38 Shrek (Steig), 72 Piaget, Jean, 1 reading Silly Sports (Donahue), 177 picture matching, 13, 17 riddles about literacy, 60–62 Sir Small and the Dragonfly riddles about specific books, 82 (O’Connor), 72 “The Pied Piper of Hamelin,” 77 space riddles, 160 Sit Stay Laugh A Book of Pet Jokes Pilkey, Dav, 69, 70 (Dahl), 176 Piper, Watty, 71 reference books, 56–57, 101 skateboarding, 148 pirates, 84, 157 reptiles, 98, 110 skating, 147 planetariums, 160 Rey, H. A. and Margret, 68 skunks, 69, 72, 115 rhinoceroses, 114 planets, 160–161 Skyfire (Asch), 72 rhymes, 43 poetry, 60 Ribsy (Cleary), 84 The Sky’s the Limit (Walton), 177 polar bears, 108 “The Riddle Book” (puppet skit), “Sleeping Beauty,” 78 The Polar Express (Van Allsburg), 72 Slobodkina, Esphyr, 68 porcupines, 113 169–171 Small, David, 70 riddle file, 47 Porte, Barbara Ann, 70 Smell That Clue (Mooser), 175 Riddle Jar, 22–23 Potter, Beatrix, 73 Smith, Dodie, 82–83 Riddle of the Week, 6, 31–32 Preller, James, 28 snakes, 115–116 Riddle Riot (Fox), 178 presents, 124, 142 The Sneetches and Other Stories Riddle Roundup, 6, 27 “The Princess and the Pea,” 77 (Seuss), 66–67 The Riddle Streak (Pfeffer), 175 pterodactyls, 101–102 snow, 14, 158–159 Riddle-De-Dee (Cerf), 2, 178 public relations, 35–38 “Snow White,” 78 Riddles (Rosenberg), 177 “The Punch Line” (puppet skit), snowboarding, 148 Riddles and More Riddles (Cerf), 176 172–174 snowman puppets, 108, 159 “Rip Van Winkle” (Irving), 84 Punny Places (Swanson), 177 soccer, 148 Rissinger, Matt, 177 puppet skits space, 13, 159–161 Roaring with Laughter (Dahl), 176 “The Ghost Bridge,” 30, 42, spiders, 100 Robin Hood, 77 165–169 Spooky Jokes (Rosenbloom), 177 Rockwell, Thomas, 82 presenting, 40–42 Spooky Riddles (Brown), 176 rodents, 102 “The Punch Line,” 172–174 Spooky Sillies (Moore), 177 Rosenberg, Pam, 177 “The Riddle Book,” 169–171 sports, 13, 143–148, 152–153 Rosenbloom, Joseph, 177, 178 puppets spring (season), 14, 133 Rowling, J. K., 82 asking riddles with, 40 spy stories, 64, 67 “Rub-a-Dub-Dub,” 90 dish and spoon, 40, 206 Spyri, Joanna, 82 “Rumpelstiltskin,” 78 making with children, 39–40 squirrels, 116 Rylant, Cynthia, 12, 70 paper bag, 36–37, 40, 207–209 St. Patrick’s Day, 83, 132–133 presenting skits with, 40–42 stars, 161 snowman, 108, 159 S Steig, William, 72, 73 “Puss in Boots,” 77 School Buzz (Dahl), 176 Stellaluna (Cannon), 72 puzzles, 36 School Jokes (Rosenberg), 177 Stevens, Janet, 67 School Jokes (Rosenbloom), 177 Stevenson, Robert Louis, 81, 84 Q School Kidders (Ziegler), 177 Stine, R. L., 82 Schultz, Sam, 177 The Stinky Cheese Man and Other “The Queen of Hearts,” 90 Scieszka, Jon, 72 Fairly Stupid Tales (Scieszka), quiet games, 25–26 seals, 114 72 The Search for Delicious (Babbitt), 84 Stinky Riddles (Hall and Eisenberg), R seasonal bulletin boards, 14–15 176 Rabbit-cadabra (Howe), 72 secret messages, 18, 37 Stoker, Bram, 81 rabbits, 106, 113–114 Seeger, Pete, 73 The Story of Ferdinand (Leaf), 72–73 Raggedy Ann series (Gruelle), 84 Seldon, George, 81 Strega Nona (dePaola), 78 rain, 14, 157–158 sharks, 114–115 The Substitute Teacher from the Black Ramona series (Cleary), 84 Sharmat, Marjorie Weinman, 86 Lagoon (Thaler), 175 Ranger Rick magazine, 19, 179 Sharmat, Mitchell, 69 summer (season), 104, 135–136 “Rapunzel,” 77 Sheila Rae, the Brave (Henkes), 72 sun, 161 Rash, Andy, 67 shelf order, 34 Super Goofy Jokes (Horsfall), 178index 216 superheroes, 161–162 toads, 75, 110, 116 “Wee Willie Winkie,” 90 Swanson, June, 177 Tokuda, Wendy, 86 werewolves, 128–129 swimming, 148 Tolkien, J. R. R., 83 whales, 117 Sylvester and the Magic Pebble (Steig), The Toll-Bridge Troll (Wolff), 30, 40, What Will You Find in the Library? 73 176, 178 17–18 Toll-Bridge Troll game, 6, 30–31, 46 What’s in a Name? (Donahue), 177 “Tom Thumb,” 79 White, E. B., 80, 84 T “Tom, Tom, the Piper’s Son,” 90 Who Said That? 6, 17, 27, 191, 197 The Tale of Peter Rabbit (Potter), 73 “The Tortoise and the Hare,” 79 Who Wrote That? 6, 16, 27, 192, Talk, Talk (Chocolate), 26, 178 Totally Silly Jokes (Grambs), 178 197 Talking Turnips Treasure Island (Stevenson), 84 Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road? animal riddles, 149–150 triceratops, 114 (Cole), 176 around the house riddles, The Trumpet of the Swan (White), 84 Why Should You Go to the Library? 150–151 turtles, 106–107, 116–117 17, 37, 195–196 bulletin boards, 5–6, 13, 17, Twain, Mark, 79 wild animals, 107–117. See also specific 149–153 Twenty Thousand Leagues under the animals car riddles, 151 Sea (Verne), 85 Wilder, Laura Ingalls, 83 clothes riddles, 151 Williams, Vera, 68 folktale, 163–165 Winnie-the-Pooh (Milne), 85 U food and drink riddles, 152 winter (season), 14, 139–140 Under Arrest (Dahl), 176 games to play, 5–6, 26, 28–29, witches, 129 unicorns, 117 184–186 Wolff, Patricia Rae, 30, 40, 176, 178 illustrated riddles, 20 The Wolf’s Chicken Stew (Kasza), 73 sports riddles, 152–153 V The Wonderful World of Oz (Baum), Who Said That? 17 Valentine’s Day, 14, 131–132 85 Tarzan (Burroughs), 84 vampires, 81, 85, 128 worms, 100–101 Terban, Marvin, 31, 46, 178 Vampires Don’t Wear Polka Dots Thaler, Mike, 46, 175, 178 (Dadey and Jones), 85 Y Thanksgiving, 15, 138–139 Van Allsburg, Chris, 72 There’s an Ant in Anthony (Most), 178 Yates, Philip, 177 Verne, Jules, 85 thesaurus, 57 Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories Viorst, Judith, 67 Thidwick, the Big-Hearted Moose (Seuss), 67, 117 (Seuss), 67 W Thomas, Lyn, 178 Z “The Three Billy Goats Gruff,” Wacky Jokes (Rissinger and Yates), 78–79 177 zebras, 117 “Three Blind Mice,” 90 Ziegler, Mark, 177 Wacky Wheelies (Ziegler), 177 “The Three Little Pigs,” 79 Zion, Gene, 70 Walter’s Tail (Ernst), 73 Zoodles (Dahl), 176 Three-Alarm Jokes (Dahl), 176 Walton, Rick and Ann, 177 tigers, 116 websites, 24 zoos, 111, 112, 117–118Anderson ALA Reading Is Funny ee Anderson oer ff s innovative ways to use riddles to make reading fun and keep readers coming back for more. Based on her work with children in schools and public Dlibraries, she shares hundreds of riddles on popular subjects, plus tips to help you • Encourage children to read more through puppetry, bookmaking, and a variety of games and activity sheets • Incorporate riddles into lesson plans and programs using the themed chapters (animals, holidays, reading, and much more) • Create interactive bulletin boards using the directions and patterns included • Promote your services and teach library skills with riddles This book is brimming with scripts for puppet skits, sample PR materials, reproducible games, Reading is Funny and easy-to-implement ideas that encourage even the most reluctant readers. School librarians, children’s librarians, teachers, parents, and caregivers will find this a welcome aid to reinvigorate reading programs and storytimes. Motivating Kids to Read with Riddles Reproducible materials can be found on the book’s website at www.ala.org/editions/extras/ Anderson09577. You may also be interested in Rob Reid Kathy MacMillan Books Books Books Books More Family IN Storytimes Bloom T Tw wenty-f enty-four Cr our Creativ eative Pr e Pro ograms f grams for or All All Ag Ages es Creative Patterns & Props that Bring Stories to Life Kimberly K. Faurot A Box Fu A Box Full of Tal ll of Tales es Easy Ways to Share Library Resources through Story Boxes www.alastore.ala.org American Library Association 50 East Huron Street Chicago, IL 60611 1-866-SHOP ALA (1-866-746-7252) www.alastore.ala.org Dee Anderson
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