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Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering

Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering
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Dr.LeonBurns,New Zealand,Researcher
Published Date:21-07-2017
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Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I Lectures No. 1 and 2 Dr. Aoife Moloney School of Electronics and Communications Dublin Institute of TechnologyLectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I Overview These lectures look at the following: • Course introduction • History of Communications • Communications system • Communication modes • Methods of data communication • Time constraints DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 1Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I • Transmission modes • Analogue versus digital • Baseband and bandpass • Digital communications transceiver • Conclusion • Acknowledgement DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 2Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I Introduction • Lecturer: Dr. Aoife Moloney • Room: 426 Kevin St. • Email: aoife.moloneydit.ie • Web: www.electronics.dit.ie/staff/amoloney DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 3Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I Course Introduction • Course Code: COMM2108 • Assessment: 70 % Exam 30 % Lab • Lectures: 2 hours/week • Labs: 2 hours per week DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 4Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I Module Objectives This module is designed to give an appreciation of the princi- ples of digital communications engineering. After completing this module you should: • Be able to identify the main elements of a digital com- munications system. • Understand source formatting, in particular, sampling, quantisation, signal to quantisation noise ratio. • Be able to quantify the performance of baseband digital DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 5Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I systemsintermsofbandwidthrequirements,intersymbol interference and bit-error rates. DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 6Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I Syllabus • Introduction to digital communications • Source formatting • Multiplexing • Baseband communication: generation, transmission, de- tection DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 7Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I Textbooks Recommended Reading: • ‘PSpice for Digital Communications Engineering’, Paul Tobin, Morgan & Claypool 2007. th • ‘Communications Systems’ (4 Edition), Simon Haykin, Wiley 2001. nd • ‘CommunicationSystemsEngineering’(2 Edition),John G. Proakis and Masoud Salehi, Prentice Hall 2002. • ‘Digital Communications: Fundamentals and Applica- DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 8Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I tions’, Bernard Sklar, Prentice Hall 1988. DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 9Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I History of Communications The highlights of the inventions which have lead to commu- nications as we know it today are listed below: • 1440: Printing press - Gutenberg • 1826: Ohm’s law - Ohm • 1837: Line telegraphy invention - Gauss, Weber • 1844: Line telegraphy patent - Morse st • 1858: 1 transatlantic cable (fails after 26 days) • 1864: Electromagnetic radiation predicted - Maxwell DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 10Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I • 1866: Successful transatlantic telegraph cable (Valentia to Newfoundland) • 1875: Telephone invented - Bell • 1877: Phonograph invented - Edison • 1887: Detection of radio waves - Hertz • 1894: Wireless communication over 150 yards - Lodge • 1895: Wireless telegraphy - Marconi • 1897: Automatic telephone exchange - Strowger • 1901: Transatlantic radio transmission - Marconi DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 11Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I • 1904: Diode valve - Fleming • 1905: Wirelesstransmissionofspeechandmusic-Fesseden • 1906: Triode valve - de Forest • 1907: Regular radio broadcasts • 1915: Trans. USA telephone line - Bell System • 1918: Superheterodyne radio receiver - Armstrong • 1919: Commercial broadcast radio - KDKA Pittsburg • 1920: Sampling applied to communications - Carson • 1926: Television invented - Baird (UK), Jenkins (USA) DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 12Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I • 1928: All electronic television - Farnsworth • 1928: Theory of transmission of telegraph - Nyquist • 1928: Information theory - Hartley • 1933: FM demonstrated - Armstrong • 1934: Radar - Kuhnold • 1937: PCM (pulse code modulation) proposed - Reeves • 1939: Commercial TV broadcasting - BBC • 1943: Microwave radar used • 1944: Statistical methods to describe noise and extract DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 13Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I signals - Rice • 1945: Geostationary satellites proposed - Clarke • 1946: ARQ (automatic repeat request) proposed - Du- uren • 1948: Mathematical theories of communication - Shan- non • 1948: Invention of transistor - Shockley, Bardeen, Brat- tain • 1953: Transatlantic telephone cable DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 14Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I • 1955: Invention of laser - Townes, Schawlow • 1961: Stereo FM transmission • 1962: Satellite communication - TELSTAR • 1963: Touch tone telephone - Bell System • 1963: Geostationary communications satellite - SYN- COM II • 1963: Error correction codes developed • 1964: First electronic telephone exchange • 1965: Commercialcommunicationssatellite-EarlyBird DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 15Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I • 1966: optical fibre proposed - Kao, Hockman • 1968: Cable TV • 1970: Medium scale data networks - ARPA/TYMNET • 1970: LAN, MAN, WAN • 1971: ISDN proposed - CCITT • 1972: First cellular mobile phone • 1974: The Internet - Cerf, Kahn • 1978: Cellular radio • 1978: Navstar GPS (global positioning system) DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 16Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I • 1980: Fibre optic communications system developed - Bell System • 1980: OSI 7 layer reference model - ISO • 1981: HDTV (high-definition television) demonstrated • 1985: ISDN basic rate access introduced - UK • 1986: SDH introduced (SONET in USA) • 1991: GSM (global system for mobile communications) - Europe • 1999: WAP (wireless application protocol) DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 17Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I There have been many many more inventions since 1999. As an exercise use the Internet to find as many recent telecom- munications inventions as you can. DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 18Lectures No. 1 and 2: Introduction to Digital Communications Engineering I Communications System In its simplest form a telecommunications system consists of a transmitter, a channel, a receiver and two transducers. Channel Receiver Transmitter Estimate Message of message and input and output transducer transducer DT008/2 Digital Communications Engineering I Slide: 19