Question? Leave a message!




Formation of Nascent Soot and Other Condensed‐Phase Materials in Flames

Formation of Nascent Soot and Other Condensed‐Phase Materials in Flames
Formation of Nascent Soot and Other  Condensed‐Phase Materials in Flames Hai Wang University of Southern California Work supported by NSF, SERDP and DOE (CEFRC)Why Does Condensed‐Phase Matter Form Gas‐to‐Solid Transformation G = H ‐TS •Type 1: enthalpy driven (heat release) metal oxides carbides, nitrides •Type 2: entropy driven soot C H→ solid carbon + 4H 3 8 2 (H 0, but S 0) Progress variableDriving Force –Soot •Soot formation is entropy driven (H goes free). 2 •Condensed‐phase carbon forms as an aerosol  (kinetics driven). ○○○○○○○○ ○○○○○○○○○○○○ S S S S , , , , G G G G (kcal/molC) (kcal/molC) (kcal/molC) (kcal/molC) H H H H , , , , T T T TS S S S , , , , G G G G ( ( ( (kcal/molC kcal/molC kcal/molC kcal/molC) ) ) ) r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rCondensed‐phase material is ubiquitous in flames http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/science/fire.htm Lampblack (soot) used in  World's oldest tattoos (Tyrolean  prehistoric cave paintings  iceman, Ötzi) were etched in soot (35,00 35,00  ‐ ‐10,000 10,000  ybp) ybp (c. 3,300 BC)  G. Nelson Eby, http://faculty.uml.edu/nelsoneby/Forensic20Geology/PowerPoint20Presentations.htm http://hearth.com/what/historyfire.htmlSoot Microstructures/Composition Courtesy: Boehman http://www.asn.u‐bordeaux.fr/images/soot.jpg 3.5 Å Mature soot: C/H 8/1 = 1.8 g/cc 5 6 10 ‐10 atoms http://www.atmos.umd.edu/pedro/soot2.jpgSoot as a Versatile Material –Old and New sci.waikato.ac.nz daneshema.com http://www.asn.u‐bordeaux.fr/ images/soot.jpg renewable energy 3rd generation  carbon black solar cells heat transfer direct methanol fuel cellsSoot as Particulate Air Pollutants http://farm1.static.flickr.com/216/49996945344089c6c1d.jpg http://www.spacemart.com/images/cruis e‐ship‐smoke‐stack‐emission‐bg.jpg http://www.parks.ca.gov/pages/491/images/sierra3 http://www.sfgate.com/blogs/ima http://www.soot.biz/images/soot/soot steamlocomotive.jpg ges/sfgate/green/2009/06/03/dies 250x251.jpg el‐smoke.jpgSoot and the Climate  •Soot deposition  responsible for 95  polar ice melting •Dirty snow reduces  ice albedo •Brown clouds causes  regional  warming •Contrail related cloud  albedoDriving Forces behind Soot Research (1) The 80s’ 90s’: “A major break‐throughin understanding carbon formationwill have been  achieved when it becomes possible in at least one case to account for the  entire course of nucleation and growth of carbonon the basis of a  fundamental knowledge of reaction rates and mechanisms.” Palmer  Cullis, 1965 Frenklach, Wang, Proc. Combust. Inst.23 (1990) 1559. Frenklach, Wang,  in: Soot Formation in Combustion:  Mechanisms and Models of Soot Formation, Bockhorn, Ed. Springer‐Verlag, Berlin, 1994, pp 162‐190. Colket, Hall, in Soot Formation in Combustion: Mechanisms  and Models of Soot Formation,Bockhorn, Ed. Springer‐Verlag, Berlin, 1994, pp 442‐468. Mauss,Schafer, and Bockhorn, Combust. Flame99,  697‐705 (1994) Bockhorn, ed. Soot Formation in Combustion: Mechanisms  and Models of Soot Formation, Springer‐Verlag, Berlin, 1994. Kennedy“Models of soot formation and oxidation,” Data: Jander Wagner, Simulation:  Prog. Energy Combust. Sci.23 (1997) 95‐132. Kazakov, Wang, Frenklach (1994)Driving Forces behind Soot Research (2) The most recent decade: Fuelrich Quench Lean, Burn front end Zone Out Zone Predictive tools for combustion  engine designs Fuel injector/swirler Soot Mass w/JetA N Ne etw twork ork Reacto Reactor S r Si im mu ulation lation Courtesy of Colket F Fu ue ell s sp pr ra ay y sh shea ear r lla ay ye er r Qu Que en nch ch Bur Burn n out out z zone ones s z zone ones s R Recir ecirc cu ul la at ti io on n z zo on ne es s Bai, Balthasar, Mauss, Fuchs Proc. Combust. Inst.27 (1998) 1623. Pitsch, Riesmeier, Peters Combust. Sci. Technol.158 (2000) 389. Wen, Yun, Thomson, Lightstone Combust. Flame135 (2003) 323. Wang, Modest, Haworth, Turns Combust. Theor. Model.9 (2005) 479. Lignell, Chen, Smith, Lu, Law Combust. Flame151 (2007) 2. Mosback, Celnik, Raj, Kraft, Zhang, Kubo, Kim Combust. Flame156 (2009) 1156. HaworthProg. Energy Combust. Sci.36 (2010) 168‐259.Kinetic Mechanism of Soot Formation Bockhorn, D’Anna, Sarofim, Wang,  eds., Combustion Generated Fine  Carbonaceous Particles, Karlsruhe University Press, 2009. Courtesy of D’AnnaKinetic Mechanism of Soot Formation Mass growth Nucleation PAH Bockhorn, D’Anna, Sarofim, Wang,  Chemistry eds., Combustion Generated Fine  Carbonaceous Particles, Karlsruhe University Press, 2009. Gas‐Phase Chemistry Courtesy of D’AnnaD Diis st ta an nc ce e f fr ro om m B Bu ur rn ne er r,, H H ( (c cm m) ) p p Recent Highlights (2) • Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation explains the origin of sphericity of nascent soot particles 1 1 10 10 0 0 10 10 1 1 10 10 1. 1.1 1 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 2 2 4 4 0.8 0.8 6 6 8 8 10 10 0.7 0.7 20 20 30 30 Abid et al. (2009) Balthasar, Frenklach (2005) C H ‐O ‐Arflame = 2.1 2 4 2 Eventually P Pa ar rt tiic cl le e D Diia am me et te er r,, D D ( (n nm m) ) p p (1 (1//N N) ) dN dN//d dlog( log(D D ) ) p pRecent Highlights (3) Chemical makeup • Stochastic simulations with  detailed chemistry and aerosol  dynamics are able to predict  particle size distribution  soot  chemical compositions Particle Size Distributions Courtesy of KraftExperiments Facilitate Model Comparison Burner‐stabilized stagnation  C H /O /Arflame (= 2.1) 2 4 2 flame approach carrier N to SMPS cooling assembly 2 stagnation plate/sample probe (T ) s x u H p v 1cm r T b 1.2 1.2 1. 1.22 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 1 1500 500 10 10 10 10 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 1 1000 000 0.6 0.6 8 8 0. 0.66 10 10 500 500 H H ==  0.55 0.55  cm cm H H ==  0. 0.5555  cm cm p p p p 0.0 0.0 0. 0.2 2 0.4 0.4 0. 0.6 6 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.0 1.2 1.2 3 3 5 5 10 10 20 20 5 50 0 Distance, Distance,  H H(cm) (cm) Diameter, Diameter,  D D (n (nm m)) p p Measured and computed  Detailed PSDFs by mobility  (USC Mech II) temperature  sizing provide added resolution  in close agreement) – to probing soot nucleation and  removed the need to  mass/size growth chemistry “shift” time zero. Abid et al. (2009) Te Temp mperature erature,,  T T(K) (K) dN dN//d dlo loggD D p pCurrent Problems  Questions •PAHprecursor chemistry and its  dependency on fuel structures; •What is the mechanism of particle  inception •Is the composition of nascent soot identical  to mature soot •Is the HACAmechanism competePAHPrecursor Chemistry (1) The Hydrogen‐Abstraction—Carbon Addition (HACA) Mechanism (Frenklach) • • • • + +H H•( •(– –H H ) ) + +H H• • •Stein’s stabilomers as soot  + +C C H H 2 2 +C H + +H H• • 2 2 2 2 2 2 – –H H• • + +H H• • + +H H•(– •(–H H ) ) • • 2 2 building block +C H (–H•) 2 2 •Capture three important  • factors of molecular weight  + +H H• • + +C C H H + +H H• • 2 2 2 2 • • + +H H•( •(– –H H ) ) + +H H•(– •(–H H ) ) 2 2 2 2 growth +C H (–H•) 2 2 Flame PAH chemistry formation • • • H atom chain activation + +H H• • + +C C H H + +H H•( •(– –H H ) ) 2 2 2 2 2 2 + +H H•(– •(–H H ) ) – –H H• • 2 2 branching + +H H• • C H dominant building +C H (–H•) 2 2 2 2 species block High T heat Arrhenius … release kineticsPAHPrecursor Chemistry (2) Spectral sensitivity of pyrene concentration  • Earlier work aimed at  90 Torr burner stabilized C H /O /Ar flame  2 2 2 developing consistent    (Bockhorn), H= 0.55 cm thermodynamic H+O =O+OH 2 Main flame HO +H=OH+OH 2 HO +OH=O +H O 2 2 2 chemistry HCO+O =CO+HO 2 2 J Phys Chem97 (1993) 3867. CH+H =CH +H 2 2 CH +O =CO +H+H 2 2 2 CH +H =CH +H 2 2 3 transport C H +O=CH +CO 2 2 2 C H +OH=C H+H O 2 2 2 2 C H +H(+M)=C H (+M) 2 2 2 3 Combust Flame96 (1994) 163. HCCO+H=CH +CO 2 HCCO+CH =C H4+CO 3 2 C H +O =C H O+O 2 3 2 2 3 chemical kinetic C H +CH =C H +H 2 2 2 3 3 C H +CH =C H +H 2 2 2 3 3 C H +OH=C H +H O J Phys Chem 98 (1994) 11465;  3 3 3 2 2 First aromatic C H +OH=C H +HCO 3 3 2 3 C H +C H =A 3 3 3 3 1 ring Combust Flame110 (1997) 173;  cC H +H=A 6 4 1 C H +H=nC4H 4 2 3 Proc Combust Inst23 (1990) 1559. A +H=A +H 1 1 2 Aromatic growth A +OH=A +H O 1 1 2 chemistry A +H(+M)=A (+M) 1 1 descriptions of PAHformation nA C H +C H =A +H 1 2 2 2 2 2 A +OH=A 1+H O 2 2 2 A 1+H(+M)=A (+M) 2 2 A C HA+H(+M)=A C HA 2 2 2 2 A C HA+OH=A C HA+H 2 2 2 2 2 A C HA+C H =A 4 2 2 2 2 3 • Lessons learned: P +H=P +H 2 2 2 P +C H =A +H 2 2 2 3 A +H=A 4+H 3 3 2 PAHformation is sensitive to a  A 4+H(+M)=A (+M) 3 3 A 4+C H =A +H 3 2 2 4 multitude of elementary  0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 Logarithmic Sensitivity Coefficient reactions and local flame  Wang  Frenklach, CF(1997) conditions.PAHPrecursor Chemistry (3) Spectral sensitivity of pyrene concentration  90 Torr burner stabilized C H /O /Ar flame  2 2 2 n‐dodecane‐air flame speed (Bockhorn), H= 0.55 cm H+O =O+OH 2 = 1, T = 403 K Main flame 0 HO +H=OH+OH 2 HO +OH=O +H O 2 2 2 chemistry HCO+O =CO+HO H+O 2 2 =O+OH 2 CH+H =CH +H 2 2 CH +O =CO +H+H CO+OH=CO +H 2 2 2 2 CH +H =CH +H 2 2 3 C H +O=CH +CO HCO+H=CO+H 2 2 2 2 C H +OH=C H+H O 2 2 2 2 C H +H(+M)=C H (+M) HCO+H O=CO+H+H O 2 2 2 3 2 2 HCCO+H=CH +CO 2 H+OH+M=H O+M HCCO+CH =C H4+CO 2 3 2 C H +O =C H O+O 2 3 2 2 3 HCO+M=CO+H+M C H +CH =C H +H 2 2 2 3 3 CH +H(+M)=CH (+M) C H +CH =C H +H 3 4 2 2 2 3 3 C H +OH=C H +H O 3 3 3 2 2 First aromatic CH +OH=CH +H O 3 2 2 C H +OH=C H +HCO 3 3 2 3 C H +C H =A 3 3 3 3 1 ring C H (+M)=C H +H(+M) 2 3 2 2 cC H +H=A 6 4 1 C H +H=nC4H 4 2 3 C H +H=C H +H 2 3 2 2 2 A +H=A +H 1 1 2 Aromatic growth C H +OH=C H +H O 2 4 2 3 2 A +OH=A +H O 1 1 2 chemistry A +H(+M)=A (+M) 1 1 C H +O =CH CHO+O 2 3 2 2 nA C H +C H =A +H 1 2 2 2 2 2 A +OH=A 1+H O 2 2 2 2CH =H+C H 3 2 5 A 1+H(+M)=A (+M) 2 2 detailed model A C HA+H(+M)=A C HA 2 2 2 2 CH +HO =CH O+OH 3 2 3 A C HA+OH=A C HA+H 2 2 2 2 2 simplified model A C HA+C H =A 4 2 2 2 2 3 HO +H=2OH 2 P +H=P +H 2 2 2 P +C H =A +H 2 2 2 3 0.1 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 A +H=A 4+H 3 3 2 A 4+H(+M)=A (+M) 3 3 Sensitivity Coefficient A 4+C H =A +H 3 2 2 4 0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 You et al. Proc. Combust. Inst. (2009) Logarithmic Sensitivity Coefficient Wang  Frenklach, CF(1997)PAHPrecursor Chemistry (3) Spectral sensitivity of pyrene concentration  Lessons learned: 90 Torr burner stabilized C H /O /Ar flame  2 2 2 (Bockhorn), H= 0.55 cm •PAHformation is sensitive to a multitude  of elementary reactions. H+O =O+OH 2 Main flame HO +H=OH+OH 2 HO +OH=O +H O 2 2 2 chemistry HCO+O =CO+HO 2 2 CH+H =CH +H 2 2 •Accurate prediction of PAHformation may  CH +O =CO +H+H 2 2 2 CH +H =CH +H 2 2 3 C H +O=CH +CO require a precision in main flame  2 2 2 C H +OH=C H+H O 2 2 2 2 C H +H(+M)=C H (+M) 2 2 2 3 chemistry currently unavailable. HCCO+H=CH +CO 2 HCCO+CH =C H4+CO 3 2 C H +O =C H O+O 2 3 2 2 3 C H +CH =C H +H 2 2 2 3 3 •PAHformation can be highly sensitive to  C H +CH =C H +H 2 2 2 3 3 C H +OH=C H +H O 3 3 3 2 2 fuel structures. First aromatic C H +OH=C H +HCO 3 3 2 3 C H +C H =A 3 3 3 3 1 ring cC H +H=A 6 4 1 C H +H=nC4H 4 2 3 4D01: Hansen, Kasper, Yang, Cool, Li,  A +H=A +H 1 1 2 Aromatic growth A +OH=A +H O 1 1 2 Westmoreland, Oβwald, Kohse‐ chemistry A +H(+M)=A (+M) 1 1 nA C H +C H =A +H 1 2 2 2 2 2 Höinghaus,Fuel structure A +OH=A 1+H O 2 2 2 A 1+H(+M)=A (+M) 2 2 A C HA+H(+M)=A C HA dependence of benzene formation 2 2 2 2 A C HA+OH=A C HA+H 2 2 2 2 2 A C HA+C H =A 4 2 2 2 2 3 processes in premixed flames  P +H=P +H 2 2 2 P +C H =A +H 2 2 2 3 fueled by C H isomers A +H=A 4+H 3 3 2 6 12 A 4+H(+M)=A (+M) 3 3 A 4+C H =A +H 3 2 2 4 0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 •Possibly a large number of pathways to  Logarithmic Sensitivity Coefficient PAHs have yet been considered. Wang  Frenklach, CF(1997)PAHPrecursor Chemistry (4) Thermodynamic Origin of PAHFormation/Growth Beyond HACA 0. 0.5 5 +H +H(– (–H H ) ) +H +H( (– –H H ) ) 2 2 • • • 2 2 +C +C H H (– (–H) H) 2 2 2 2 +C +C H H (– (–H H) ) 0. 0.0 0 2 2 2 2 +H +H ( (+ +M M) ) +H +H( (– –H H ) ) 2 2 +H +H ( (+ +M M) ) +C +C H H 2 2 2 2 +C +C H H 2 2 2 2 –0 –0.5 .5 +H +H ( (+ +M M) ) • • • • • +C +C H H (– (–H H) ) 2 2 2 2 –1 –1.0 .0 • • • • • • +H +H ( (+ +M M) ) +H +H ( (+ +M M) ) C C H H55 55 44 44 33 22 21 21 00 2 2 2 2 H H 11 00 10 10 00 11 00 00 11 H H 00 11 12 12 22 22 33 33 33 2 2 •While HACAcaptures the thermokineticrequirements for PAHformation, its  reversibility opens it to competitions from other pathways ○○ G G (kcal (kcal//mo mol lC C) ) rrPAHPrecursor Chemistry (5) Known Pathways beyond HACA •Propargyl combination (Fahr  Stein 1990) 0 0 2C 2C H H 3 3 3 3 +H +H 20 20 40 40 •• •• 60 60 80 80 10 100 0 12 120 0 14 140 0 Miller and Klippenstein (2003) Rate coefficient calculation require high‐quality PES(e.g., CASPT2),  RRKM/Master equation modeling, flexible, variationaltransition state theory •Sequential dehydrogenation from cycloparaffins(Westmoreland 2007) •Phenyl addition/cyclolization pathway (Koshi 2010) •Fulvenallene + acetylene (Bozzelli2009) •Cyclopentadienyl + acetylene (Carvallottiet al. 2007) •Cyclopentadienyl + cyclopentadienyl (Colket 1994; Mebel2009) • • •• • • E En ner erg gy y (kcal/m (kcal/mo oll) )PAHPrecursor Chemistry (6) Recent advance in probing flame by molecular beam synchrotron  photoionization mass spectrometry will be critical to further progress. Photoionization mass spectra of flame species  of burner stabilized aromatics/oxygen/50  argon flames (30 Torr, C/O = 0.68)  determined  by molecular beam synchrotron  photoionization mass spectrometry.   1: benzene 2: toluene 3: styrene 4: ethylbenzene 5: o‐xylene 6: m‐xylene 7: p‐xylene  Courtesy of QiPAHPrecursor Chemistry ‐Summary 1. PAHformation is sensitive to main flame chemistry,  local flame conditions, fuel structure and  composition. 2. For real fuels and their surrogate, the number of  pathways to aromatics is currently undefined; and it  remains to be seen whether this number is finite. 3. Requires theoretical approaches beyond one‐ reaction‐at‐a‐time type calculations. 4. Need to account for the formation of aromatic  radicalsSoot Nucleation (1) C/H C/H C C 1.2 1.2‐ ‐2 2 Violi/D’Anna B B Frenklach/Wang 2 2 Miller A A Homann 10 10Soot Nucleation (2) Particle Diameter, D (nm) 12 345 10 1 10 • Second‐order nucleation  Dimensionless time x = 1 2 10 kinetics –dimerization  3 10 x = 5 4 10 of soot precursors – x = 20 5 10 leads to Persistent  6 x = 50 10 bimodality. 7 10 8 10 0 1 2 3 10 10 10 10 Particle Size Parameter, i 2 10 • First‐order nucleation  3 10 x = 10 kinetics gives PSDFs that  4 10 x = 20 x = 50 5 10 are persistently  6 10 unimodal. 7 10 8 10 9 10 10 10 0 1 2 3 10 10 10 10 Particle Size, i Zhao et al. (2003a) Dimensionless Number Density, n /C Dimensionless Number Density, y i oSoot Nucleation (3) Fl Flo ow w m me eter ter Se Second conda ar ry y P PP P 1 1 2 2 Co Coo oling ling Co Coo oling ling air air Fil Filt ter er water water wa wate ter r D Dilue iluen nt t Measured PSDFs are indeed bimodal Exh Exha aust ust N N at at 2 29 9.5 .5 l lp pm m 2 2 orif orifi ic ce e Sample Pr Sample Pro ob be e System System 2 10 H = 0.65 cm H = 0.55 cm H = 0.60 cm 1 10 Po Porous plug rous plug 0 bu burner rner 10 SMPS System SMPS System SMPS System Mo Mo Mod d de e el 308 l 308 l 3080 0 0 Electro Electro Electros s st t ta a atic C tic C tic Cl l la a as s ssi si sifier fier fier 1 10 Shielding Ar Cooling water C H /O /Ar 2 4 2 2 Kr Kr Kr 10 85 85 85 Exh Exh Exha a aus us ust t t Mo Mo Mod d de e el l l 3 ND ND NDMA MA MA 30 30 302 2 25 5 5A A A 10 UCP UCP UCPC C C 4P P P 10 2 10 H = 0.7 cm H = 0.8 cm H = 0.9 cm 1 10 0 10 1 10 2 10 3 10 4 10 2 10 H = 1.0 cm H = 1.1 cm H = 1.2 cm 1 10 0 10 1 10 2 10 3 10 4 10 3 3 46 810 30 50 346810 30 50 46810 3050 Particle Diameter, D (nm) Zhao et al. 2003 Nomralized Distribution Function, n(D)/NSoot Nucleation (5) Mass spectrum of fragments from photoionization  of nascent soot show periodicity 100‐Torr acetylene‐oxygen flame (= 3.25)  Courtesy of Grotheer Soot Nucleation (1) C/H C/H C C 1.2 1.2‐ ‐2 2 Violi/D’Anna B B Frenklach/Wang 2 2 Miller A A Homann 10 10D Diis st ta an nc ce e f fr ro om m B Bu ur rn ne er r,, H H ( (c cm m) ) p p Soot Nucleation (6) –5 •T 1500 K, x  10 H •Temperature is too low to explain persistent nucleation if  mechanism C dominates   1 1 10 10 0 0 10 10 1 1 10 10 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0. 0.9 9 2 2 4 4 0.8 0.8 6 6 8 8 10 10 0.7 0.7 20 20 30 30 Abid et al. (2009) c c D D ( (n nm m) ) P Pa ar rt ti i l le e D Di ia am me et te er r, , p p (1 (1//N N) ) dN dN//d dlog log( (D D ) ) p pSoot Nucleation (1) C/H C/H C C 1.2 1.2‐ ‐2 2 Violi/D’Anna Possible, but not general B B Frenklach/Wang 2 2 Miller A A Homann 10 10Soot Nucleation (7) 10 100 0 Herdman and  ci circ rcu um mco coro ron ne ene ne Miller (2008)  o ov val alen ene e co coro ron ne en ne e Binding energy of  ch chr ry ys se ene ne be benz nzo o ghi ghi pery peryle lene ne py pyrene rene coronene =  a an nthra thrace cene ne phe phen nant anth hre rene ne 10 10 25 kcal/mol na naphtha phthal le en ne e 1 10 0 100 100 N Nu um mb be er r of of C C at atom oms s 800 800 600 600 400 400 0 0 10 10 200 200 1 1 10 10 2 2 10 10 3 3 10 10 4 4 10 10 5 5 10 10 12 12 33 44 55 66 77 Nu Num mb be er r of Aro of Arom mati atic c Ring Rings s Rela Relative Con tive Conc cen entration tration Bi Bind ndin ing g Ene Ener rg gy y ( (c cka kall//m mo ol) l) Bo Boil iliin ng/ g/Su Sub bllim imation ation Temper Temperatu atur re ( e (K K) )Soot Nucleation (8) Is 25.4 kcal/mol enough to bind a pair of coronene together 2 coronene →(coronene) 2  6 1   HE+1 h4kT  0 iB i1 exp hk T 1  iB    ○ 32 •G too positive to allow binding above 700 K  30 2   SB  2 hp 1  ln  •Entropy tears the dimer apart.  4 2 Rm  ek T   u 2 B  6 hk T 150  hk T iB iB  ln 1e Nonbinding   hk T i1 iB e 1  100 50 Assumptions: ‐1 v = 200 cm i 0 ‐1 ‐2.12 B(cm ) = 1510 x MW  = 1 2 50 Binding Ovalene E = 35 kcal/mol 100 0 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 Circumcoronene E = 63 kcal/mol 0 T (K) Even they would not bind  1600 K. o G (kcal/mol)Soot Nucleation (8) Is 25.4 kcal/mol enough to bind a pair of coronene together 2 coronene →(coronene) 2  6 1   HE+1 h4kT  0 iB i1 exp hk T 1  iB    32  30 2   SB  2 hp 1  ln   4 2 Rm  ek T   u 2 B  6 hk T  hk T iB iB 60  ln 1e   hk T i1 iB coronene e 1  40 ovalene 20 Assumptions: ‐1 0 v = 200 cm i ‐1 ‐2.12 B(cm ) = 1510 x MW 20  = 1 2 circumcoronene 40 60 Ovalene E = 35 kcal/mol 0 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 Circumcoronene E = 63 kcal/mol 0 T (K) Even they would not bind  1600 K. o G (kcal/mol)Soot Nucleation (1) C/H C/H C C 1.2 1.2‐ ‐2 2 Violi/D’Anna Possible, but not general B B Frenklach/ 2 2 Miller A A Homann 10 10Soot Nucleation (9) •Polyacenes are singlet diradicals (though arguable). •Ground‐state polyacenes are close‐shell singlets, but the adiabatic S0‐T1  excitation energy is only 13 kcal/mol for heptacene ‐Hajgató et al. (2009). •Applications in organic light emitting diodes and organic semiconductors  and capacitors.Soot Nucleation (10) zigz zigzag edg ag edge e i i = = 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 •Zigzag edges of graphene have localized  ‐electronic states  j j = 1 = 1 Kobayashi 1993; Klein 1994 •Zigzag edges have an open‐shell singlet  2 2 ground state  e.g., Fujitaet al. 1996; Nakada1996 3 3 •Finite‐sized graphenes have radical or  even multiradical characteristics. ij ij ij yyy iii jjj yyy e.g., Nakanoet al. 2008, Nagai 2010 11 11 11 000...000000000 111 333 000...000333777 21 21 21 000...000555000 222 333 000...222111777 • Side chain can induce ‐radical  31 31 31 000...111444999 333 333 000...555111000 characteristics  41 41 41 000...222888111 444 333 000...888000666 Nakanoet al. 2007 Nagai et al. 2010 •Nonlinear optics applications. UBHandHLYP/6‐31G(D) calculations  0 ≤y≤1 y= 0: close shell singlet y= 1: open shell singlet (diradical) A Ar rmc mcha hair ir e ed dg ge eSoot Nucleation ‐Summary •IfPAHs with ‐radicals do play a role in soot nucleation,  we need to  •Understand the nature and structures of these PAH species, •Determine their binding energies with relevant  species, including aromatics, •Probe them in flames (however small their  concentrations may be), •Account for the mechanism of their formation.Soot Mass Growth (1) HACAMechanism S –H + H•↔ S • + H (1) i i 2 S • + H•→ S–H (2) i i S • + C H→ S –H + H• (3) i 2 2 i+2 k H mol Catom  1f 2S k HCH  si 322 3 cm s k H   12 b •The mass growth rate is proportional to H atom concentrationSoot Mass Growth (2) Baby soot is entirely unlike mature  soot. •Comparison of mobilityand TEM measurements shows nascent  soot is liquid‐likerather than  being carbonized and rigid. •Small angle neutron scattering and thermocouple densitometry suggest that nascent soot has  C/H 1and = 1.5 g/cc.  • Photoionization aerosol mass  spectrometryindicates that  nascent soot is rich in aliphatics (in addition aromatics). • The presence of aliphatics suggests that nascent soot is not always purely aromatic. • The mass of nascent soot continue to increase in post flame where H atoms are depleted,  in contrast to HACAprediction –presence of persistent free radicals on soot surface Wang et al. 2003; Oktemet al. 2005, Zhao et al. 2007Soot Mass Growth (3) C H ‐O ‐Arflame (= 2.07, T = 1736±50 K)  2 4 2 f • “Sunny‐side up” morphology (TEM  AFM) suggests an aromatic core‐aliphatic shell  structure. •Micro‐FTIRmeasurements again show aliphatic dominance  •Thermal desportion/chemical ionization (extreme soft) show broad mass spectrum,  suggesting that nascent soot is alkylated. •The large aliphatic/aromatic ratio again suggest that the initial aromatic core may contain  persistent free radicals. Abid et al. 2008; Cain et al. 2010Soot Mass Growth (4) Evidence supporting persistent free radicals •Electron Spin Resonance spectra of anthracite, a coal containinglittle to no  oxygenated compounds, show a measurable concentration of free radicals  (Retcofsky, Stark  Friedel1968). •Soot volume fraction observed towards the stagnation surface canbe  predicted only if soot surface persists its radical nature (Wang et al 1996). •Soot from pyrolysis of C H , C H and jet fuel surrogates has appreciable  2 4 2 2 amounts of free radicals of aromatic nature.  The spin concentrations is  21 10 per gram (1 in 50 every C atoms)(Eddings, Sarofim   Pugmire2005). •Soot, an otherwise hydrophobic material, has the ability to uptake water  (Popovicheva2003).  • Binding energy between CH and HOis 1.5 kcal/mol (Crespo‐Oteroet al. 2008),  3 2 increases to 2–4 kcal/mol for C ‐C alkyl radicals (Li et al. 2009). 2 4Soot Mass Growth ‐Summary •Nascent soot has aromatic core/aliphatic shell  structure. •Soot mass growth without the presence of H atom. •Immediate questions and hypothesis:  Is HACAmechanism complete Do persistent free radicals exist on nascent soot surfaces Resonantly stabilized free radicals of semiquinone and phenoxyl origins  (Dellinger 2001). Radicals due to strain energy in hexaphenylethane and acenaphthene  derivatives (Dames et al. 2010).Soot Mass Growth ‐Summary Radicals due to strain energy in hexaphenylethane and acenaphthene  derivatives (Dames, Sirjean, Wang 2010). 70 M062X/631+G(d,p) electronic energy M062X/631+G(d,p) Isodesmic 60 60 expt 62 ONIOM 50 13 40 7 5 1 9 30 4 11 20 10 0 02 46 8 Central BDE (kcal/mol)Soot Mass Growth ‐Summary •Nascent soot has aromatic core/aliphatic shell  structure. •Soot mass growth without the presence of H atom. •Immediate questions and hypothesis:  Is HACAmechanism complete Do persistent free radicals exist on nascent soot surfaces. Resonantly stabilized free radicals of semiquinone and phenoxyl origins  (Dellinger 2001). Radicals due to strain energy in hexaphenylethane and acenaphthene  derivatives (Dames et al. 2010). Delocalized aromatic radicals on zigzag edges propagated into soot  structures (Cain et al. 2010 –3D02).Soot Formation CO, H , CO , H O, C H 2 2 2 2 2 fuel + oxidizer Previous (Calcote 1982,  Current Bockhorn 1994)The Science of Soot Formation Our View Nature’s View http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/science/fire.htm A. Ciajoloand A. Tregrossi “Sysiphusrolling a soot particle up hill”.The Science of Soot Formation Our View Nature’s View “Sysiphusstopinga soot particle  A. Ciajoloand A. Tregrossi falling off a potential energy cliff”. “Sysiphusrolling a soot particle up hill”.Other Condensed‐Phase Matters –Metal Oxide Titania TiO 2 Courtesy of Pratsinis Silicate SiO 2 Courtesy of Pratsinis