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Bucket sort

Bucket sort
ECE 250 Algorithms and Data Structures Bucket sort Douglas Wilhelm Harder, M.Math. LEL Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario, Canada ece.uwaterloo.ca dwharderalumni.uwaterloo.ca © 20062013 by Douglas Wilhelm Harder. Some rights reserved.Bucket sort 2 Outline The bucket sort makes assumptions about the data being sorted – Consequently, we can achieve better than Q(n ln(n)) run times We will look at: – a supporting example – the algorithm – run times (no best, worst, or averagecases) – summary and discussionBucket sort 7.7.1 3 Supporting example Suppose we are sorting a large number of local phone numbers, for example, all residential phone numbers in the 416 area code region (approximately four million) We could use quick sort, however that would require an array which is kept entirely in memoryBucket sort 7.7.1 4 Supporting example Instead, consider the following scheme: – Create a bit vector with 10 000 000 bits 7 • This requires 10 /1024/1024/8 ≈ 1.2 MiB – Set each bit to 0 (indicating false) – For each phone number, set the bit indexed by the phone number to 1 (true) – Once each phone number has been checked, walk through the array and for each bit which is 1, record that number Bucket sort 7.7.1 5 Supporting example ⋮⋮ For example, consider this 6857548 section within the bit array 6857549 6857550 6857551 6857552 6857553 6857554 6857555 6857556 6857557 6857558 6857559 6857560 6857561 6857562 ⋮⋮Bucket sort 7.7.1 6 Supporting example ⋮⋮ For each phone number, set the 6857548✔ corresponding bit 6857549✔ – For example, 6857550 is a residential 6857550 phone number 6857551 6857552 6857553✔ 6857554 6857555 ✔ 6857556 6857557 6857558✔ 6857559 6857560 6857561✔ 6857562✔ ⋮⋮Bucket sort 7.7.1 7 Supporting example ⋮⋮ For each phone number, set the 6857548✔ corresponding bit 6857549✔ – For example, 6857550 is a residential 6857550 ✔ phone number 6857551 6857552 6857553✔ 6857554 6857555 ✔ 6857556 6857557 6857558✔ 6857559 6857560 6857561✔ 6857562✔ ⋮⋮Bucket sort 7.7.1 8 Supporting example ⋮⋮ At the end, we just take all the numbers 6857548✔ out that were checked: 6857549✔ 6857550 ✔ 6857551 …,6857548, 6857549, 6857550, 6857552 6857553, 6857555, 6857558, 6857553✔ 6857561, 6855762, … 6857554 6857555 ✔ 6857556 6857557 6857558✔ 6857559 6857560 6857561✔ 6857562✔ ⋮⋮Bucket sort 7.7.1 9 Supporting example In this example, the number of phone numbers (4 000 000) is comparable to the size of the array (10 000 000) The run time of such an algorithm is Q(n): – we make one pass through the data, – we make one pass through the array and extract the phone numbers which are trueBucket sort 7.7.2 10 Algorithm This approach uses very little memory and allows the entire structure to be kept in main memory at all times We will term each entry in the bit vector a bucket We fill each bucket as appropriateBucket sort 7.7.3 11 Example Consider sorting the following set of unique integers in the range 0, ..., 31: 20 1 31 8 29 28 11 14 6 16 15 27 10 4 23 7 19 18 0 26 12 22 Create an bitvector with 32 buckets – This requires 4 bytesBucket sort 7.7.3 12 Example For each number, set the corresponding bucket to 1 Now, just traverse the list and record only those numbers for which the bit is 1 (true): 0 1 4 6 7 8 10 11 12 14 15 16 18 19 20 22 23 26 27 28 29 31 Bucket sort 7.7.3 13 Analysis How is this so fast – An algorithm which can sort arbitrary data must be W(n ln(n)) In this case, we don’t have arbitrary data: we have one further constraint, that the items being sorted fall within a certain range Using this assumption, we can reduce the run timeBucket sort 7.7.4 14 Counting sort Modification: what if there are repetitions in the data – In this case, a bit vector is insufficient Two options, each bucket is either: – a counter, or – a linked list The first is better if objects in the bin are the sameBucket sort 7.7.4 15 Example Sort the digits 0 3 2 8 5 3 7 5 3 2 8 2 3 5 1 3 2 8 5 3 4 9 2 3 5 1 0 9 3 5 2 3 5 4 2 1 3 We start with an array of 10 counters, each initially set to zero:Bucket sort 7.7.4 16 Example Moving through the first 10 digits 0 3 2 8 5 3 7 5 3 2 8 2 3 5 1 3 2 8 5 3 4 9 2 3 5 1 0 9 3 5 2 3 5 4 2 1 3 we increment the corresponding bucketsBucket sort 7.7.4 17 Example Moving through remaining digits 0 3 2 8 5 3 7 5 3 2 8 2 3 5 1 3 2 8 5 3 4 9 2 3 5 1 0 9 3 5 2 3 5 4 2 1 3 we continue incrementing the corresponding bucketsBucket sort 7.7.4 18 Example We now simply read off the number of each occurrence: 0 0 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 7 8 8 8 9 9 For example – There are seven 2s – There are two 4sBucket sort 7.7.5 19 Runtime summary Bucket sort always requires Q(m) memory The run time is Q(n + m) – If m = w(n), the run time is Q(m) with w(n) memory – If m = Q(n), the run time is Q(n) with Q(n) memory – If m = o(n), the run time is Q(n) with o(n) memoryBucket sort 7.7.5 20 Runtime summary We must assume that the number of items being sorted is comparable to the possible number of values – For example, if we were sorting n = 20 integers from 1 to one million, bucket sort may be argued to be Q(n + m), however, in practice, it may be less soBucket sort 21 Summary By assuming that the data falls into a given range, we can achieve Q(n) sorting run times As any sorting algorithm must access any object at least once, the run time must be Q(n) It is possible to use bucket sort in a more complex arrangement in radix sort if we want to keep down the number of bucketsBucket sort 22 References Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bucketsort 1 Donald E. Knuth, The Art of Computer Programming, Volume 3: Sorting and Searching, nd 2 Ed., Addison Wesley, 1998, §5.1, 2, 3. 2 Cormen, Leiserson, and Rivest, Introduction to Algorithms, McGraw Hill, 1990, p.1379 and §9.1. rd 3 Weiss, Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++, 3 Ed., Addison Wesley, §7.1, p.2612. 4 Gruber, Holzer, and Ruepp, Sorting the Slow Way: An Analysis of Perversely Awful Randomized Sorting Algorithms, 4th International Conference on Fun with Algorithms, Castiglioncello, Italy, 2007. These slides are provided for the ECE 250 Algorithms and Data Structures course. The material in it reflects Douglas W. Harder’s best judgment in light of the information available to him at the time of preparation. Any reliance on these course slides by any party for any other purpose are the responsibility of such parties. Douglas W. Harder accepts no responsibility for damages, if any, suffered by any party as a result of decisions made or actions based on these course slides for any other purpose than that for which it was intended.
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