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Scientific Conference Presentations

Scientific Conference Presentations 27
Scientific Conference Presentations Hilary M Jones If you are collecting Green Card/Training points, please sign in.For you if: • You have been to a conference, but not yet given a presentation at one • You have already given a presentation at a conference and would like some more tips for next timeIn this session • What makes a good conference presentation • What to include • Structure • Conference presentations vs other types • Visual aidsIn this session • Presenting yourself • Tips for nonnative speakers • What could go wrong • Dealing with nerves • Making your presentation accessibleOverlap • Body language • Nerves • General presentation skills tips May overlap with other presentation skills sessionsUseful referencesThe worst conference presentation you ever saw In groups of 3, introduce yourselves and then talk about the worst conference presentation you witnessed. What made it so badSimple presentation structure 1. Tell them what you’re going to tell them title, introduction and reason your main story 2. Tell them reiterate your 3. Tell them what hypothesis and the you’ve told them takehome message from your storyStructure in more detail…What to include in a conference presentation – ‘the rules’ • Title • Informative • Don’t baffle the audience with a complex title More info in handout.Introduction • Hypothesis and objectives • Rationale and justification for study • Introduction has logical pattern and relates to other literature and scientific principlesSidetrack: A word about patents • If you describe your ‘invention’ to the public before you have registered the patent, it is considered public information, and therefore will not be patented.Back to the story: Materials and Methods • Show that your methods are supported by the literature and scientific principles • Logical, stepbystep process for carrying out the experiment and collecting data • Explain why you chose your experimental design and statistical analysesResults and Discussion • Summarise at the beginning and at the end • Relate results to objectives Important • Limit the number of data points and present them clearly • Discuss points relating to: other research practical or scientific applicationsConclusions • Reiterate the main points you want the audience to remember • Show a list of conclusions and relate them back to your objectives • Examples of use/application of your findingsConference presentations vs lab meeting presentations In small groups: 1. How will the presentation differ from a lab meeting presentation 2. How will you, the speaker be differentGeneral Points • Formal presentation • Avoid an overfamiliar style • Avoid colloquialisms • Definitely don’t swearVisual Aids • Professional • Easy to read • Not distracting resist the temptation to include excessive moving images/noises etc More info in handout.How could these slides be improvedP Pl la as sm ma a the f fo ou ur rt th h state of P Pl la as sm ma a f fo ou ur rt th h matter • As a gas gets increasingly hot, the bonds holding the gas molecule together eventually break • The resulting substance contains charged particles – ions and electrons – but is overall neutral. • This is a p p p pl l l la a a as s s sm m m ma a a a. • Because the particles are charged they respond to electric fields; because they are charged and moving they respond to magnetic fields •F = ma = q (E + v × B) • It is in a plasma that fusion occurs – heat up deuterium/tritium gas sufficiently that the deuterons tritons are moving so fast that they overcome their electrical repulsion.Plasma: the fourth state of matter • As a gas gets increasingly hot, the bonds holding the gas molecule together eventually break • The resulting substance contains charged particles – ions and electrons – but is overall neutral. • This is a plasma. • Because the particles are charged, they respond to electric fields; because they are charged and moving they respond to magnetic fields. F = ma = q (E + v × B) • It is in a plasma that fusion occurs – heat up deuterium/tritium gas sufficiently that the deuterons tritons are moving so fast that they overcome their electrical repulsion.Plasma: the fourth state of matter • As a gas gets increasingly hot, the bonds holding the gas molecule together eventually break • The resulting substance contains charged particles – ions and electrons – but is overall neutral. • This is a plasma. • Because the particles are charged, they respond to electric fields; because they are charged and moving they respond to magnetic fields. F = ma = q (E + v × B) • It is in a plasma that fusion occurs – heat up deuterium/tritium gas sufficiently that the deuterons tritons are moving so fast that they overcome their electrical repulsion.Presenting Yourself Preparation • Who are your audience and what do they know • What equipment will you have • Where is the talk • How many people • How long do you havePresenting Yourself Preparation Keeping track of the talk: • Notes on paper • Cards • Rely on PowerPoint screen • Memory • ScriptPractise • 3 times by yourself • 2 times in front of friends/colleagues • 1 more time than you think you need toTiming • Allow 1 minute per slide • Time your rehearsals REMEMBER: noone is so important that they should overrunNonnative speakers of English • Rehearse often, with a native speaker listening • Record your presentation and listen for areas for improvement • Structure your slides so that they can be understood even if your words are not (more images/diagrams)Presenting Yourself Body Language • Face the audience • Eye contact • Look out for annoying mannerisms • Dress appropriately • Stand up straight • Lift the head • Project your voiceDuring the speech • Volume • Speed • Articulation • Eye contact • Ends of sentences audible • MonotonyUsing emphasis • Change the volume of the voice • Repeat words or phrases • PauseWhat could go wrong What do you worry might go wrong when you give a conference presentation Write the scenarios down and we will discuss ways to mitigate/deal withNerves Two types: • Intangible nervousness – accept the nerves and deal with the symptoms • Tangible nerves – work hard to reduce the causes preparation examplesNerves • Dry mouth – water • Shaky hands – avoid laser pointer/papers • Shallow breathing – take deep breaths • Tense muscles – tighten and release • With practise, nerves make a better performanceA word about colours • Nondifferentiation between red and green is relatively common (1 in 25 people) • Doublecheck that non of your information is conveyed by colour onlyA word about colours All cone cells working protanope (red cone cells defective) deuteranope (green cone cells defective) tritanope (blue cone cells defective)A word about colours A typical confocal image protanope (red) deuteranope (green) tritanope (blue)In this session • What makes a good conference presentation • What to include • Structure • Conference presentations vs other types • Visual aidsIn this session • Presenting yourself • Tips for nonnative speakers • What could go wrong • Dealing with nerves • Making your presentation accessibleSummary • Make sure that your words and your slides are understood and enjoyed by everyone (someone in the room could be your next employer)Handout contains • Printouts of slides • How to structure a presentation • Visual aids • Thinking on your feet • Checklist for your conference presentationUseful references Scientific Conference Dazzle ‘em with Style. Presentations – Martha The Art of Oral Scientific Davis Presentation – Robert H AnholtContact me Hilary M Jones hmj500york.ac.uk Tel: 8740 You can find this presentation on the PhD website: http://www.york.ac.uk/depts/biol/skillsdev/PhDpages/documentbank.htm
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