Question? Leave a message!




Why Should You Give A Public Presentation

Why Should You Give A Public Presentation 1
4H MEMBER PUBLIC PRESENTATION GUIDELINESCONTENTS How to do 4H Public Presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Visuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 What is a Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Check your visual before you use it . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Why Should You Give A Public Presentation . . . . . 1 Posters and charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Computer Generated Visuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 So What Do You Talk About . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Learn More About Your Subject . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 How to Use Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Develop A Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Color Combinations for posters and slides . . . . . . . 11 What color means in the background . . . . . . . . . . 11 Types of Presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Backgrounds and Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1 Demonstrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2 . Illustrated Talks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 3 . Project ‘Whys’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Transitions and Animations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 4 P . ublic Speaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Team Demonstrations, Illustrated Talks, Practice and Judge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 or Project Whys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Practice for Confidence and Poise . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 How Well Did You Do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Presentation Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Outline Of A Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Be A Star Presenter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 The Title . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 South Dakota 4H Public Presentation Guidelines . . 15 The Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Demonstration Illustrated Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Public Speaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Demonstration and Illustrated Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Project Why . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Project ‘Why’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Public Speaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Summary or Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Tips for Setting Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Showmanship – Mechanics of Presenting . . . . . . . . . . 7 Appearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Eye Contact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Body Language/Posture/Movement . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Voice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Gestures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 COMMITTEE MEMBERS Chairman Bradley Keizer, 4H Youth Program Advisor Assistant Carrie Regehr Weller, 4H Youth Program Advisor Megan Peterson, 4H Youth Program Advisor Becca Tullar, 4H Youth Program Advisor Mike Frey, Volunteer Advisor Karelyn Farrand, 4H Youth Character Education Field SpecialistSOUTH DAKOTA 4H 2014 How to do 4H Public Presentations WHAT IS A PRESENTATION By definition a presentation is an activity in which someone shows, describes, or explains something to a group of people . A presentation is a way for you to share and teach information you have learned that will be useful to others . Any time you learn something and show and tell it to another person, you are giving a presentation . Speaking facetoface is one of the oldest forms of communication, and still the most effective . The lis tener hears your words, but more than that, they watch your face and your hands . They catch your enthu siasm, or your concern . It is a warm, personal way of communicating . No matter what 4H project you are enrolled in, you can give a presentation . Every 4H member should give at least one presentation per year . Giving presentations is an important part of a member’s 4H expe rience . WHY SHOULD YOU GIVE A PUBLIC PRESENTATION For the rest of your life you will be communicating . No matter if it is at home, school or work you will need to know how to persuade others to gain their support, how to explain things or ask for something . The speaking skills you gain through 4H Public Presentations will have longerlasting benefits than any other project you enroll in . MARKETABLE LIFE SKILLS By giving 4H Public Presentations you will gain many skills that • How to speak before an audience will help you later in life . You will gain a positive stage presence with poise, capability and self whether you are speaking to an individual or an audience . Hav confidence. ing the ability to organize your thoughts and information and • How to find and research a subject present it will allow you to become a valuable leader to others . and supplies with initiative and The speaking skills you gain in 4H will help you to better com motivation. municate with your friends and family . Those same skills will • How to plan and organize information benefit you in job interviews and in your future career . When and thoughts in a logical manner. professionals are surveyed as to what skills are needed to • How to prepare original visuals and succeed, public speaking ranks at the top of their list . Unfortu use them to support what you say. nately, public speaking ranks as a top fear for many people . Giv • How to express yourself clearly, ing public presentations in 4H can be learned by most people convincingly and creatively. and with practice it will become easier with each presentation . • How to teach and show others what Plus, you will gain confidence which will make you feel more at you have learned. ease in presenting . • How to select an appropriate delivery method and use appropriate delivery Public presentations add variety, spark, interest and enthusiasm techniques. to the 4H program . It is a fun way to learn new knowledge • How to listen to the opinions of and share it with others . When 4H members do the work to others and accept feedback. prepare a presentation for others, they will be more likely to • How to manage your time remember the information and other members often listen and • How to manage stress learn more from other youth . Page 1GETTING STARTED Start with something simple…among friends at a 4H Club meeting . You’ll have their interest and support, and the WHEN SELECTING YOUR SUBJECT, butterflies won’t be fluttering in your stomach as much . ASK YOURSELF IS IT: • Something you like to do Not all public presentations can be done in the living room • Something you have learned to do or about 4H or kitchen . Your club may want to meet in a school, com • One single idea or theme munity center, bank basement, or get out into the barn, • Something others would like to know about garage, or garden . A demonstration on how to plant a tree • Timely and seasonal • Something interesting, worthwhile and has eco is not recommended for the living room . nomic or practical importance to you and or your When members have sufficient experience, encourage audience them to give presentations at public gatherings such as • Something you can do in a limited time service club meetings and county public presentation • A topic of interest which you already have some knowledge and would like to know more about. days . • A subject suitable to your age, experience, and All 4H members should give at least one demonstration, surroundings illustrated talk, project why or public speech each year . You will learn more when you do a presentation than the members who watch . It need not always be a solo performance . Some members may prefer to team up with a friend, rather than go it alone . Working with a team member is a different experience than working alone . It is okay if a beginner or younger 4H member wants to be assisted by an older brother or sister or a junior leader . SO WHAT DO YOU TALK ABOUT Your first step is to select a subject or topic . Usually you’ll DEVELOP A PLAN do best if you choose a subject from your own experi Planning helps you to: ences . Determine the purpose of your presentation . Is it • organize your ideas • manage your time to inform, or do you want to create action If you know • be prepared who your audience will be, consider them . • eliminate being rushed and stressed. LEARN MORE ABOUT YOUR SUBJECT Ask yourself how much time will I need to: Find out all you can about your subject . There is no sub • Research more information stitute for being well informed . Take notes as you read • Write my presentation and make my visuals and study . A “computer idea file” becomes the catchall • Collect the equipment for my presentation storage location for topics and subject information . This • Practice and be prepared to present at my very file can be used at a later time to look up information . best Remember: • All your statements must be accurate . • You need to know more information than you tell . Sources of subject information vary according to the presentation: • 4H project literature • Extension Fact Sheets Bulletins • school textbooks • library sources • current magazines, newspapers books • commercial material • local resource people • tours and trips Page 2TYPES OF PRESENTATIONS Once you’ve chosen your subject, it will be easier for you to decide what kind of presentation you’ll want to plan . Review the differences in the four public presentations and select the best one for your purpose and subject . There are many types of public presentations, in South Dakota 4H, we use four types: 1 . Demonstrations 2 . Illustrated Talks 3 . Project “Whys” 4 . Public Speaking They are all different, and you should try each to see which one you’re most comfortable with . 1. DEMONSTRATIONS • A demonstration is doing and showing how . As you show how, you tell what you are doing . • In a demonstration, you make or do something step by step . There is always a finished product, or a task is completed . Show the finished product in the summary . • Actual products, materials, garments, machines, plants, animals, etc . are used . Personal, family, or club experiences may be used . • In a successful demonstration the audience leaves knowing how to do what you demonstrated and often times will want to do it themselves . • It is true and accurate . • You learn by doing . The audience learns by watching and listening . • A demonstration may be an individual or team effort . 2. ILLUSTRATED TALKS • An illustrated talk is telling how by using visuals . You may use computer generated charts, flip charts, posters, pictures, models, cut outs, slides, flannel board, chalkboards, and real objects . There is not a finished product . • Personal, family, or club experiences may be used . • The key to an illustrated talk is you learn by telling . The audience learns by watching and listening . • It is true and accurate . • An illustrated talk may be an individual or team effort . • Remember that an illustrated talk is the same as a demonstration except that: You are not actually making something . You have no real finished product . Your visuals show what you are explaining . 3. PROJECT ‘WHYS’ • A project why is an informative presentation that teaches about the why as well as the use of something . • A project why encourages, excites, and motivates further study of a specific subject . It stimulates the curious mind . • Project Why’s encourage 4H members to find out for themselves by asking questions, seeking answers, making observations, experimenting, testing, making comparisons, collecting and identi fying facts, organizing and recording knowledge, and then telling others about the facts . Page 3• A project why may use flip charts, posters, pic tures, slides or actual experiments to explain why . TEAM PRESENTATIONS • This presentation will be set up in a location Demonstrations, Illustrated Talks where you will need to be able to stop a moving and Project ‘Whys’ Team is 2 people audience that is walking by your Project Why Pre sentation . Sometimes two can give these presentations better • Personal, family, or club experiences may be than one, especially if four hands are needed or when used . it is difficult to work and talk at the same time. Team • The key is to find out why something is or is not presentations require careful planning and more practice. Teamwork teaches cooperation. true and to tell others about the fact . It is true and accurate . In a team presentation, divide it so both of you will • You learn by doing . The audience learns by watch have about the same amount to do. Make the divisions ing, asking, and listening . where it would be natural to shift from one process or idea to another. When you are showing how, you will • A project why may be an individual or team effort . be the one telling about it. While your teammate is If presenting a Team Project “Why” evidence showing how, you will serve as his/her silent helper. must be provided that both presenters conducted the Project “Why” research . • Remember that a project why is basically the same as a demonstration or an illustrated talk, ex cept that: You are showing why . You are not following a stepbystep method or showing a finished product . 4. PUBLIC SPEAKING • Public speaking is talking . • Public speaking is telling about your experiences or what you have learned . • In public speaking, it is what you say and how you say it that informs the audience and communi cates your ideas to them . Public speaking is good when you want to tell facts, ideas, or give infor mation . • Public speaking is more formal than other public presentations . Examples of a public speaking pre sentation: government official speech, a sermon, a lecture . • Public speaking may not use visual materials . • Personal, family, or club experiences may be used . • The most effective speech is the one that presents most clearly and impressively what the speak er has in mind . It is true and accurate . • You learn by doing . The audience learns by listening . Public speaking is an individual effort . • Remember that Public speaking is basically the same as a demonstration, an illustrated talk, or a project why, except that: It is just telling . It requires careful planning and effective delivery with facial expressions and gestures, voice variation in your pitch, volume, speed and inflections as well as proper English . So, which method do you use What are you trying to tell What’s your main purpose Whether you wish to show, explain, tell or do a combination of these will determine whether you use a demonstration, illus trated talk, project why or do public speaking . Page 4PRESENTATION PARTS Demonstrations, Illustrated Talks, Project “Whys” and Public Speaking require similar preparations . They are composed of three parts: the introduction, the body and the summary . The Introduction should be 10 15 of your speaking time, the body 75 and the conclusion 10 . In other words, the Introduction you tell them what you will tell them; the Body you tell them; and in the conclusion you tell them what you have told them . OUTLINE OF A PRESENTATION 1 . Introduction • Catch • Personal Introduction • Brief outline of main points 2 . Body • Point A • Point B • Point C 3 . Summary/Conclusion • Summarize Main Points • Give Sources of Information • Ask for Questions (Do not ask for questions in Public Speaking . ) THE TITLE Every presentation needs a good title . The title is your first chance to catch the attention of the audience . Be dramatic . Good titles are short, descriptive and intriguing . They suggest the subject without telling the whole story . For example, if you are going to do a demonstration on eye makeup, you might choose the title The Eyes Have It as opposed to Applying Eye Makeup . Don’t be concerned about coming up with the title first . It may be the last part of the presentation you decide . It will come THE INTRODUCTION Your second chance to catch the attention of the audience and to set the tone of your presentation is in your introduction . Be creative, original and interesting, and use only 12 minutes . There are many ways to capture the audience’s attention, here are a few suggestions: • Ask a question . (This is the easiest but probably the least creative choice . ) • Share a fascinating fact or startling statistic . • Quote someone . • Share a personal story . • Show a completed product . • Show an unusual object . • Wear a mask or a costume . • Sing, dance, or do a skit . (Be sure it doesn’t last too long and don’t be silly . ) • Enter in an unusual way such as popping up from behind the table . • Demonstrate an action without speaking . Be sure your introduction leads into the body of the presentation in such a way that the audience will want Page 5to listen . Tell the audience what you plan to do, why you chose the subject, why it is important and what you hope your audience will learn from your presentation . It is always good to incorporate your title into the introduction . Before or after your attention getter you will need to introduce yourself . Include your name, age, your club and how many years you’ve been in 4H . If someone introduces you, it isn’t necessary to repeat your name and facts about yourself . In a team presentation each presenter can introduce themselves . BODY The body is the main part of your presentation . This is where you explain your topic and present all of your information . How you organize the body is very important because the audience needs to be able to fol low what you are saying and/or doing . DEMONSTRATION AND PROJECT ‘WHY’ PUBLIC SPEAKING • Make notes in your own words using • Make notes in your own words using ILLUSTRATED TALK key words or phrases. Do not write key words or phrases. Do not write • Make notes in your own words using down everything you will say. down everything you will say. key words or phrases. Do not write down everything you will say. • Outline what you will show and explain • Outline the 34 main points in a logical why – arrange facts, their application order. • Outline what you will do and say in the and then why in a logical order. presentation. Arrange information in a • Decide how you can use hand gestures, logical order. • Select or prepare charts, visuals or facial expressions and voice variations experiments – make them show the to strengthen your talk. • Select equipment, materials or visuals. ‘why’ of your information. • Prepare posters or charts. Make • Think through what you will say – them easy to read, understand and explain facts and why. attractive. • You may not be able to start with an • Think through what you will say – introduction. Your audience may ask explain what, how and why of each a question about what they see then, step. start by answering their question. Your audience may only give you a glance and go on by. In this case, you will need to be prepared with an introduction that will stop them by asking a question, giving a fact or statement. Once you have their attention then you may share the rest of your information. SUMMARY OR CONCLUSION This is your last chance to summarize the main points . Emphasize what you want your audience to know or do . Be brief and to the point . Do not introduce new material in the summary . Try to tie the summary back to your introduction or title . Attractively display the finished product or completed task . Then, share your sources for your presentation . In a demonstration or illustrated talk, ask for questions . Some may not have understood everything you said or would like to know more about your subject . If you cannot answer a question, admit it Do not bluff Offer to find the information or give a resource that would have the answer . Indicate to the audience that you are through with a challenge, or a statement about your subject . Page 6SHOWMANSHIP – MECHANICS OF PRESENTING APPEARANCE TIPS FOR SETTING UP • Remember how you look is the audiences’ first im • Check your outline for necessary supplies and pression of your presentation . Your clothes should equipment. Use only the equipment that is necessary be neat, clean, well pressed and attractive . Appropri and practical for your presentation. ate dress will depend upon the subject . Avoid things • Arrange the equipment and supplies in the most that attract attention (do not chew gum) . Avoid fads . convenient manner. The center of the table should be left free for the “doing” part. Trays provide a natural • There should be no writing on your clothes unless it way to group materials and keep the table neat. Put applies to your presentation . all supplies and equipment needed on a tray to your right, once it is used place it on the empty tray to • Be sure your hands and fingernails are clean and your left. Towels may be used to cover trays. well kept . • List equipment and supplies on a small card and place • Keep jewelry to a minimum . with that tray. Double check list to be sure you have all equipment and supplies. • Use light makeup . • Place extra equipment on a second table away from • Keep hair off your face . For food presentations tie the demonstration table. hair back or cover with a scarf, hairnet or cap . • Develop skill in the use of the equipment. Have the equipment in good condition. See if electrical • Start with a smile and a pleasant expression; they go equipment works before you begin. a long way in getting the attention of your audience . • In the interest of safe practices, bring ingredients EYE CONTACT or supplies in their original containers or product • Look your audience in the eye . Look at your audi packaging, whenever possible. There may be a ence 7580 percent of the time . few examples when this is not practical, such as flour. Label contents stored in glass or clear plastic • Eye contact is important because it invites the audi container to use for the supplies. In general, do not ence into your presentation . promote or endorse product or brand name that is used in the presentation. However, product or brand BODY LANGUAGE/POSTURE/MOVEMENT name comparisons can be used for educational • Stand tall, on both feet . purposes when referencing consumer issues. • To help people to see; you may use: a slanted • Keep your hands at your sides when you are not surface, table with raised back legs or a slanted making something or gesturing . mirror overhead, or use clear bowls and containers. • Avoid turning your back to the audience or shifting • A paper sack taped to the table is good for waste and swaying . disposal. • Keep a towel or sponge handy to use for spills, wiping • Do not lean on the table or podium this gives the hands or cleaning the table when you have finished. impression you are tired or don’t care about your presentation . • Use standard measurements, cups, spoons, etc. Measure accurately. If you do not have time to do all VOICE of the steps in your presentation, you may save time • Talk in a conversational voice to the audience . by measuring some ingredients in advance. Give clear and correct explanations of the steps you did not • Project your voice so the whole room can hear you . show the audience. Page 7• Slow down, inexperienced and nervous speakers tend to talk too fast . An experienced speaker will vary the rate at which they speak . Be sure to emphasize certain words that are important . Learn to enunciate your words clearly . • Use your own words in describing your steps . If you memorize your information or use someone else’s words, it will sound less convincing . • Use complete sentences with correct grammar and the proper choice of words to make the meaning clear . Often a nervous or unprepared speaker uses terms like “um,” “ah,” or “you know . ” Replace those with a pause of silence take a breath and begin again . • Practice using a microphone . If a microphone is available use it for the ease of the audience to hear you . GESTURES • Gestures should reinforce what you are saying and should be a natural expression of your thoughts . • When you begin a new section of your speech, step forward or to the side . Don’t pace, but change positions . • Use the whole body to emphasize your points – a raised finger to call attention, a shrug to show in difference, a fist to emphasize strong feeling . • The face is very important for gesturing . Use your smile, your eyes, and your eyebrows to convey the thought . • Be natural, be at ease, be happy, and be sure to smile . Page 8VISUALS CHECK YOUR VISUAL BEFORE YOU USE IT. 1. Visibility – Is it easy to see and read from where COMPUTER GENERATED VISUALS participants sit There are several key elements that can be a part of any computer generated visual. You will 2. Simple – Is the message easy to understand have many options for text, color, background, 3. Interest – Does it attract and hold attention or is it graphics, transitions, animations or sounds. How cluttered with too many words or pictures you use these elements will make the difference between an effective presentation and one that’s 4. Useful – Are the letters, words, pictures, etc . distracting and hard to understand. As much suitable for the subject and audience fun as it is to try all of these elements using too 5. Structure – Are the ideas grouped in sequential order many in one presentation can be distracting. 6. Information – Is it factual and is the data current POSTERS AND CHARTS • Wellprepared and skillfully used posters and charts help the audience understand more completely, learn faster, and remember longer . • When using posters and charts remember to: keep them simple make them readable place them where they are easily seen select visuals carefully to fit the presentation . • Use charts and posters only if they “add to” the presentation “and make it” more effective . Use charts to: serve as a guide to the member show comparisons add interest to the title, topic and ideas summarize main thoughts . presented introduce a subject focus and hold the audience’s attention Present the main points emphasize key points give instructions clarify a complicated process or procedure • Number the backs of posters for easy identification and placing them in order . For ease of changing posters, put posters in reverse order on the easel . Move posters from the back to the front . For ex ample, arrange posters: Title poster, Poster 6, Poster 5 and so on . When you are finished with your title poster move Poster one from the back of the posters to place on top of the Title Poster . • Skill in using charts must be developed . When pointing out something use the hand closest to the poster or chart . Show visual only when you are talking about that idea . • When using flannel graphs, flash cards, slides, pictures, drawings, chalkboards, models, etc . , be sure they are neat, clean, in good condition, and can be clearly seen . • You do not have to be an artist to have neat, readable charts and posters . Charts should be eye catching but not elaborate, and limited to one idea . Page 9• Some guidelines to use when making charts and posters: Charts and posters should be large enough to be seen at 30 feet . Use letters in size from 1 inch to 3 inches high . Use a combination of capital and lower case letters . Use simple solid blocktype letters . Use bold or heavy lined letters in preference to the thin, light or short, squatty letters . To emphasize a word, vary style of letter . Use color to emphasize words . Allow a margin on top and sides and slightly more on the bottom . Do not mix letters of various colors within words . They are difficult to read . TEXT Any writing you put on computer slides in your presentation is called text . Using a computer gives you many options to how much text you have, the color of the text, the fonts and sizes of text . Below are tips to remember about the text in your presentation . • Use the 6 X 6 rule –This rule states that you should have no more than six lines on a slide and no more than six words each line . Using this rule prevents you from putting too much information on the slide . A common mistake is typing everything you want to say . This takes attention off you be cause the audience reads the information themselves and stops listening to you . And, since people read at a different speed than they listen this can become very distracting . • Use easytoread fonts – While there are lots of different fonts you could use, stick to basic fonts like Arial and Times New Roman . Basic fonts are easier to read and can be found on most comput ers . This is important if you plan to copy your presentation onto a CD or portable drive for use in another computer . If the second computer does not have the fonts you used in making your presen tation, it will replace it with a font that is similar . This similar font might totally change the spacing of text on lines . Using basic, simple fonts can help prevent this from happening . • Limit font types and sizes – Try not to use more than two types and sizes of fonts in a presenta tion . For instance, one font might be used for the titles and another the rest of the text in your slides . The size of the fonts in your presentation should be consistent throughout . That means all titles on each slide should be the same size and the body of the slide text should be the same size . The recommended minimum sizes for text are: o Slide title text 44 points o Body of slide text 28 points o Common fonts are Arial and Times New Roman Arial Body of slide text Slide Title Times New Body of slide text Roman Slide Title • Case size – AVOID ALL CAPS TEXT IN ALL CAPITAL LETTERS ARE HARDER TO READ than case that has both upper and lower letters . • Use bold for emphasis. Use it sparingly, for headlines or a word here and there . Page 10HOW TO USE COLOR The color used in posters, charts and computer generated slides creates a mood or feeling for your pre sentation . Color attracts attention and can be used for highlighting items you want to emphasize . Using different colors helps you compare several different items . The colors allow the audience to easily see dif ferences in the items . Understanding how a color relates to other colors is important . For instance, a bright yellow with other bright primary colors will not stand out, but put it with a darker color and it will . You will need to remem ber warm colors stand out (advance) and cool colors look farther away (recede) . • Keep the colors simple – Use a basic set of colors COLOR COMBINATIONS FOR one or two vivid colors and then the tints and shades POSTERS AND SLIDES. (lighter and darker versions) of the color . Color combinations listed in order of legibility: • Use Color contrast – For example light colored text Black on yellow White on blue White on green on a dark background or vice versa . Colors with little Green on white Black on white White on black contrast will blend together and be hard for the audi Red on white Yellow on black Red on yellow ence to read . Also, remember that some of your au Blue on white White on red Green on red dience may be color blind, so be careful how you use reds and greens . If you are using those two colors to compare items for instance in a graph a color blind person may not be able to see the difference in the two colors . COMPUTER BACKGROUNDS AND TEMPLATES For your presentation there are usually many different WHAT COLOR MEANS template designs or color schemes for you to select from IN THE BACKGROUND on your computer . Some templates have a design border • gray = neutral, reporting – use for presentation while a background is a solid color . Another option is to with no emotional sway design a border for your presentation . Here are some tips • blue = calm, conservative, loyal, reduces pulse on choosing backgrounds or templates . and blood pressure use to present unfavorable • Select backgrounds to enhance presentation – information Find a background or template that will evoke the • green = analytical, precise, resistance to change mood or feeling you want to have for your presenta use to encourage interaction, or want to be opinionated, assertive tion . A presentation showing how to make a Thanks • red = vitality, urge to achieve results, impulse, giving turkey craft will look good with a background raises our spirits use when want to motivate with fall colors and leaves . • yellow = bright, cheerful, may be too much light • Avoid clutter – Many templates have a border or • violet = mystic union, unimportant and unrealistic, irresponsible and immature, humor, charm, delight image incorporated in the design . Consider this • brown = decreased sense of vitality, projects when choosing a template . If you are adding many dullness pictures or illustrations to your presentation, the • black = negation of emotions; surrender, power, to template design may distract from them . It may be discourage argument better to choose a solid color background . Page 11GRAPHICS Graphics are the photos, illustrations, or clip art you add to your presentation . Graphics can be used to support your point or to add some humor to your presentation . When using graphics, remember the fol lowing: • Be consistent – It is a good idea to stick with similar types of graphics . If you are using clipart, try not to combine a simple line drawing with a very intricate illustration . • Use graphics to make the message clearer – If you are adding a graphic just because you can, skip the graphic . It needs to support what you are trying to say . • Be sure text contrasts with background – If you chose a template or background color scheme, the text colors may already provide enough contrast . However, you may choose to make the title and text bold, change the size, or even choose a font that you think contrasts more with the template or background . SOUND Sounds tend to distract from you . Since you want the audience to be listening to what you are saying, it is better just to avoid using sounds . TRANSITIONS AND ANIMATIONS There are many ways slides, text and graphics can come onto the screen . Transitions are how each slide comes onto the screen . Animations are how the text and graphics come onto and leave the screen . Tips for transitions and animations: • Best slide transition – is the one that the audience does not even know happened . • Be consistent – Use the same type of transitions throughout the presentation . Also, be consistent on how the text comes onto the slide . • Make them simple – It is a good idea to use basic animations such as: o Wipes o Fades • Make them natural – An animation that feels natural will keep the audience listening to you rather than trying to figure out where the next set of words will come from . Natural animations are: o Drop from above o Appear from left • Use for emphasis – If you really want to emphasize a point, this is when it is appropriate to add a fancy animation . Page 12PRACTICE AND JUDGE PRACTICE FOR CONFIDENCE AND POISE That’s all you have left to do – practice . Follow your outline . Do not memorize . Use your own words . If you use notes, have key words or phrases on a card, for quick glance to keep you on your way . If you use cards write only on one side and number them for ease of organizing them . Keep the information in logical order . Synchronize action and explanation . Check to see if everything is blending together smoothly . By practicing you will develop your skill and will be able to stay within the time limit . Ask your family or 4H leader to watch you . Have them ask you questions and make sugges tions . Practice in front of a mirror . See how you react to watching yourself . Ask yourself, “Would I stay for this” Practice gives you confidence . Remember, you can help the audience react favorably to your presentation if you are enthusiastic when you present it . Having enthusiasm will help convince the audience they want to make what you are making or try your idea . Also, don’t let the misuse of a word or the slip of a piece of equipment upset you . Goofs happen – go right on with your presentation . Members should practice using the judge’s scorecard and then discuss the points with an adult . It is good selfanalysis . Members may also practice with each other using the judge’s scorecard . By practicing with each other, you see what others can do . HOW WELL DID YOU DO After the presentation be your own judge, ask yourself: • Was my audience interested • Did I feel at ease • Did I enjoy giving the presentation • Did I know my information well enough The next time you give a presentation, choose a more advanced subject to test your skill and gain greater confidence in yourself . Page 13BE A STAR PRESENTER Participating in Public Presentations provides you the opportunity to master the skill of presenting informa tion to another person or audience . Multiple presentation skills will be developed by each different presen tation you choose to present . By presenting a minimum of one presentation per year you will sharpen and advance your skills . You will gain life skills that will help you: • Speak before an audience with poise, capability and selfconfidence . • Find and research a subject and supplies with initiative and motivation . • Plan and organize information and thoughts in a logical manner and present it creatively . • Prepare original visuals and use them to support what you say . • Express yourself clearly and convincingly . • Teach and show others what you have learned . • Select an appropriate delivery method and use appropriate delivery techniques . • Listen to the opinions of others and accept feedback . • Manage your time • Manage stress • Tell other people of what they have learned in 4H . • Gain knowledge about the presentation topic . RIBBON SYSTEM LEVEL OF MASTERY The Ribbon System is designed to help you recognize the Level of Mastery you have accomplished . • Purple – Designates superior work – presentation is clearly superior in attracting attention and arousing interest, conveys message, design, originality and workmanship . • Blue – Designates excellent work – presentation meets standards in all major aspects . • Red – Designates average work – presentation lacks one or more qualities . • White – Designates needs improvement – presentation clearly lacks several qualities . Everyone who gives a presentation is a winner. Page 14SOUTH DAKOTA 4H PUBLIC PRESENTATION GUIDELINES • The 4H Public Presentation Publication Resource can be located at (http://igrow . org/up/resources/0140002014 . pdf) • Youth should not promote any particular product or brand name during their presentation . • Ingredients or supplies should be from original containers or packaging . When this isn’t practical (e . g . , flour), participants should place the product in labeled clear plastic container . • Presentations may have been prepared during the 4H year and given previously in school, during extracurricular activities or to service organizations; however, youth must alter the presentation to in clude and relate it to their 4H projects and/or their 4H experiences . In their delivery: o 4H members must use the word “4H” and state the specific 4H project or program . o 4H members must state how their content teaches the listener or audience about a specific 4H project(s) or program . o EXAMPLES: “I am enrolled in the 4H Beef Project . Today I will tell you what I learned about proper nutrition for my market steer through my 4H project work . ” “Today my illustrated talk on Nutrition Fact or Fiction falls under the Foods and Nutrition Project and the Health Project . I will be sharing with you what I have learned from both of these 4H Project areas on how good nutrition leads to a healthy life . ” • 4H Public Presentations are all timed events . In the case the presentation is under the minimum or over the maximum time requirement 3 points will be deducted from the participants score . PRESENTATION TYPES AND CRITERIA Demonstration – Maximum Length: 25 minutes – Individual or Team Presented before an audience, a demonstration is an accurate stepbystep process of actions and expla nations that results in a finished product . Individuals or teams use actual products, material, garments, machines, plants, animals, etc . , and may also share personal, family or club experiences . Demonstrations may include charts, illustrations, posters, and other types of visual aids . Illustrated Talk – Maximum Length, 25 minutes – Individual or Team Presented before an audience, an illustrated talk is original, true and accurate information showing how something is accomplished using a combination of speaking about and showing one or more visual aids (e . g . , Power Points, charts, pictures, slides, models, miniatures or real objects, flannel board, flip charts, chalkboard, drawings, and cutouts) . Personal, family or club experiences may be used . In the Illustrated Talk, there is no finished product; rather, an explanation of results that is illustrated with visuals . Project “Why” – Repeats Several Times during a One Hour Period – Individual or Team This type of presentation teaches the “why” as well as how to “use” a specific topic (it is not neces sarily sciencerelated) . For the purpose of gaining knowledge and understanding and through the use of sound research, facts, principles, and experiments, this presentation type informs others of the “why . ” It should encourage, excite and motivate curious minds to study the topic further . 4H members prepare a 3 x 3foot exhibit to use for accurately explaining a true “why” principle . Participants must furnish all Page 15equipment (a table will be provided) and stay with the exhibit for a one hour period to engage and present information to the public and answering questions at predetermined location . If presenting a Team Project “Why”evidence must be provided that both presenters conducted the Project “Why” research . Public Speaking – Min Length: 3 minutes Max Length: 6 minutes Individual In public speaking, a 4H member chooses a subject or topic which relates to an aspect of 4H (project, program, promotion, etc . ) . Public Speaking is telling about your experiences or what you learned about the topic to others . Public Speaking may not use visual aids . Participants may use brief notes, if desired . Page 16County PUBLIC PRESENTATIONS Demonstration Name ID Age Division Individual Team Name ID Age Division Individual Team Title CRITERIA Points Possible Comments Introduction – 10 Points Captures audience attention tells audience what you 1 2 3 4 5 are going to tell them Introduce yourself: include name, age, club, years in 4H 1 2 3 4 5 Body – 35 Points Organization of materials talk 1 2 3 4 5 Content quality/facts/sound research methods, terms 1 2 3 4 5 Accurate and complete information 1 2 3 4 5 Usefulness of information 1 2 3 4 5 Coordination of speaking and showing 1 2 3 4 5 Use of words, voice, gestures movement 1 2 3 4 5 Originality 1 2 3 4 5 Visuals including Power Point – 15 Points Visible and/or readable 1 2 3 Interest 1 2 3 Emphasize main points 1 2 3 Appropriately constructed 1 2 3 Suitable 1 2 3 Accomplishment – 10 Points Desired results discussed or demonstrated 1 2 3 4 5 Finished product shown or task completed 1 2 3 4 5 Summary – 10 Points Main points emphasized, Definite closing 1 2 3 4 5 Ability to answer questions 1 2 3 4 5 Stage Presence 10 Points Contestant’s enthusiasm and poise 1 2 3 4 5 Suitable attire, appearance, and posture 1 2 3 4 5 Relates to 4H Program and/or Project – 10 Points Stated the word 4H and stated the specific project or 1 2 3 4 5 program Stated how content teaches the listener or audience 1 2 3 4 5 about the specific project or program Length of Presentation: Start End Minimum time – Beg. 3 min.; Jr. 5 min.; Sr. 7 min. Maximum time limit: 25 minutes (If under or over time deduct 3 points) TOTAL 100 Comments: Circle Appropriate Ribbon Placing Purple Blue Red White Judge’s Signature Judge’s Signature (10090) (8980) (7970) (69 below) South Dakota State University, South Dakota counties, and U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. South Dakota State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and offers all benefits, services, education, and employment opportunities without regard for race, color, creed, religion, national origin, ancestry, citizenship, age, gender, sexual orientation, disability, or Vietnam Era veteran status. Publication: 0140032016 Updated: February 2016 Page 17 SAMPLECounty PUBLIC PRESENTATIONS Illustrated T alk Name ID Age Division Individual Team Name ID Age Division Individual Team Title CRITERIA Points Possible Comments Introduction – 10 Points Captures audience attention tells audience what you 1 2 3 4 5 are going to tell them Introduce yourself: include name, age, club, years in 4H 1 2 3 4 5 Body – 35 Points Organization of materials talk 1 2 3 4 5 Content quality/facts/sound research methods, terms 1 2 3 4 5 Accurate and complete information 1 2 3 4 5 Usefulness of information 1 2 3 4 5 Coordination of speaking and showing 1 2 3 4 5 Use of words, voice, gestures movement 1 2 3 4 5 Originality 1 2 3 4 5 Visuals including Power Point – 15 Points Visible and/or readable 1 2 3 4 5 Interest 1 2 3 4 5 Emphasize main points 1 2 3 4 5 Appropriately constructed 1 2 3 4 5 Suitable 1 2 3 4 5 Summary – 10 Points Main points emphasized, Definite closing 1 2 3 4 5 Ability to answer questions 1 2 3 4 5 Stage Presence 10 Points Contestant’s enthusiasm and poise 1 2 3 4 5 Suitable attire, appearance, and posture 1 2 3 4 5 Relates to 4H Program and/or Project – 10 Points Stated the word 4H and stated the specific project or 1 2 3 4 5 program Stated how content teaches the listener or audience 1 2 3 4 5 about the specific project or program Length of Presentation: Start End Minimum time – Beg. 3 min.; Jr. 5 min.; Sr. 7 min. Maximum time limit: 25 minutes (If under or over time deduct 3 points) TOTAL 100 Comments: Judge’s Signature Judge’s Signature Circle Appropriate Ribbon Placing Purple Blue Red White (10090) (8980) (7970) (69 below) South Dakota State University, South Dakota counties, and U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. South Dakota State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and offers all benefits, services, education, and employment opportunities without regard for race, color, creed, religion, national origin, ancestry, citizenship, age, gender, sexual orientation, disability, or Vietnam Era veteran status. Publication: 0140042016 Updated: February 2016 Page 18 SAMPLECounty PUBLIC PRESENTATIONS Project Why Name ID Age Division Individual Team Name ID Age Division Individual Team Title CRITERIA Points Possible Comments Ability to Stop Moving Audience – 20 Points Captures and holds audience attention, originality 1 2 3 4 5 Introduce yourself: include your name, age, club, years in 1 2 3 4 5 4H and tells audience what you are going to tell them Ability to answer audience’s questions 2 4 6 8 10 Organization – 30 Points Content quality facts: sound research methods 1 2 3 4 5 True, accurate and complete information 1 2 3 4 5 Usefulness of information 1 2 3 4 5 “Why” is explained 2 4 6 8 10 Coordination of speaking and showing, Use of words, 1 2 3 4 5 voice Visuals including Power Point – 30 Points Organization of visuals presentation 1 2 3 4 5 Visible and/or readable 1 2 3 4 5 Attracts attention 1 2 3 4 5 Conveys message 1 2 3 4 5 Reinforce “Why” 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 Appropriately constructed 1 2 3 4 5 Stage Presence 10 Points Contestant’s enthusiasm and poise 1 2 3 4 5 Suitable attire, appearance, and posture 1 2 3 4 5 Relates to 4H Program and/or Project – 10 Points Stated the word 4H and stated the specific project 1 2 3 4 5 or program Stated how content teaches the listener or audience 1 2 3 4 5 about the specific project or program TOTAL 100 Additional Comments: Scheduled for 1 hour. Circle Appropriate Ribbon Placing Judge’s Signature Judge’s Signature Purple Blue Red White (10090) (8980) (7970) (69 below) South Dakota State University, South Dakota counties, and U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. South Dakota State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and offers all benefits, services, education, and employment opportunities without regard for race, color, creed, religion, national origin, ancestry, citizenship, age, gender, sexual orientation, disability, or Vietnam Era veteran status. Publication: 0140052016 Updated: February 2016 Page 19 SAMPLECounty PUBLIC PRESENTATIONS Illustrated T alk Name ID Age Division Individual Team Name ID Age Division Individual Team Title CRITERIA Points Possible Comments Introduction – 10 Points Captures audience attention tells audience what you 1 2 3 4 5 are going to tell them Introduce yourself: include name, age, club, years in 4H 1 2 3 4 5 Body – 35 Points Organization of materials talk 1 2 3 4 5 Content quality/facts/sound research methods, terms 1 2 3 4 5 Accurate and complete information 1 2 3 4 5 Usefulness of information 1 2 3 4 5 Coordination of speaking and showing 1 2 3 4 5 Use of words, voice, gestures movement 1 2 3 4 5 Originality 1 2 3 4 5 Visuals including Power Point – 25 Points Visible and/or readable 1 2 3 4 5 Interest 1 2 3 4 5 Emphasize main points 1 2 3 4 5 Appropriately constructed 1 2 3 4 5 Suitable 1 2 3 4 5 Summary – 10 Points Main points emphasized, Definite closing 1 2 3 4 5 Ability to answer questions 1 2 3 4 5 Stage Presence 10 Points Contestant’s enthusiasm and poise 1 2 3 4 5 Suitable attire, appearance, and posture 1 2 3 4 5 Relates to 4H Program and/or Project – 10 Points Stated the word 4H and stated the specific project or 1 2 3 4 5 program Stated how content teaches the listener or audience 1 2 3 4 5 about the specific project or program Length of Presentation: Start End Minimum time – Beg. 3 min.; Jr. 5 min.; Sr. 7 min. Maximum time limit: 25 minutes (If under or over time deduct 3 points) TOTAL 100 Comments: Judge’s Signature Judge’s Signature Circle Appropriate Ribbon Placing Purple Blue Red White (10090) (8980) (7970) (69 below) South Dakota State University, South Dakota counties, and U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. South Dakota State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and offers all benefits, services, education, and employment opportunities without regard for race, color, creed, religion, national origin, ancestry, citizenship, age, gender, sexual orientation, disability, or Vietnam Era veteran status. Publication: 0140042016 Updated: August 2016 Page 20 SAMPLEREFERENCES • 4H Presentation Manual, University of California, 4H Youth Development Program, 2005 . • Speak up with Confidence Tips on Presenting in Nine Key Areas, University of Idaho Extension, 2012 . • Public Presentation Curriculum For use with 4H Program Clubs, Workshops or other Educational Set tings, Nebraska Extension, 4H Youth Program . • 4H Member Guide: How to Make a 4H Public Presentation, Rutgers Cooperative Extension, New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 2010 . • North Carolina 4H Presentation Handbook, North Carolina State University, AT State University Co operative Extension, 2007 . • A Primer on Presentations, Oregon State University, Extension Service, 4H Youth Development, 2009 . • 4H Public Presentation Guide, AgriLife Extension, Texas A M System, 2010 . • How to do 4H Public Presentations, South Dakota State University . South Dakota State University, South Dakota counties, and U .S . Department of Agriculture cooperating . South Dakota State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and offers all benefits, services, education, and employment opportunities without regard for race, color, creed, religion, national origin, ancestry, citizenship, age, gender, sexual orientation, disability or Vietnam Era Veteran Status . Page 21 Publication: 0140122014 Contact Karelyn Farrand
Website URL
Comment