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Corporate Writing Style Guide

Corporate Writing Style Guide 12
Corporate Writing Style Guide Updated April 2014Express Scripts Writing Style Guide Contents Abbreviations and Acronyms ..........................................................................................3 Academic Degrees ...................................................................................................3 Addresses ...............................................................................................................3 a.m. and p.m. .........................................................................................................4 e.g. ........................................................................................................................4 Express Scripts, ES, ESI ..........................................................................................4 Units of Measure .....................................................................................................5 Capitalization ...............................................................................................................6 Departments, Divisions and Programs ........................................................................6 Drug and Disease Names ..........................................................................................7 Headings and Subheadings ......................................................................................7 Job Titles ................................................................................................................8 Formatting ...................................................................................................................9 Boldface .................................................................................................................9 Bulleted Lists ..........................................................................................................9 Copyright Line .......................................................................................................10 Dates ...................................................................................................................10 Fractions ..............................................................................................................11 Headings ..............................................................................................................11 HIPAA statement for PBM communications ..............................................................12 HIPAA statement for pharmacy communications .......................................................12 Italics ...................................................................................................................12 Numbers ...............................................................................................................13 Numerical Ranges .................................................................................................13 Return Address......................................................................................................14 Telephone Numbers ...............................................................................................14 Times ...................................................................................................................14 Time Ranges .........................................................................................................14 Time Zones ...........................................................................................................15 Underlining ...........................................................................................................15 URLs ....................................................................................................................15 Revised April 2014 1 Word Wrap – for print materials only ........................................................................15 Punctuation ...............................................................................................................17 Colon ...................................................................................................................17 Comma .................................................................................................................17 Em Dash ...............................................................................................................17 En Dash............................................................................. ...................................18 Exclamation Mark ..................................................................................................18 Hyphen .................................................................................................................18 Periods .................................................................................................................18 Semicolons ...........................................................................................................19 Quotation Marks ....................................................................................................19 Symbols.....................................................................................................................20 Ampersand ...........................................................................................................20 Asterisk ................................................................................................................20 (“at”) ................................................................................................................20 Emoticons.............................................................................................................20 Money ..................................................................................................................20 Number (Pound) Sign ............................................................................................21 Percent and Percentages ........................................................................................21 Registered Mark, Service Mark and Trademark Symbols .............................................21 Words and Wording Express Scripts Approved Terms and Spellings ..................................22 Appendix: Client Proposals Exceptions ..........................................................................32 Bulleted Lists ........................................................................................................32 Comma .................................................................................................................32 Dates ...................................................................................................................32 Express Scripts’ .....................................................................................................32 Express Scripts, ES, ESI ........................................................................................32 Numbers ...............................................................................................................32 Pricing Supplement ...............................................................................................32 Revised April 2014 2Abbreviations and Acronyms • Don’t use abbreviations and acronyms that readers won’t quickly recognize. In most cases, identify the full name on the first reference and then place the acronym in parentheses if the term is repeated in the same document. Example: Express Scripts has an industryleading generic fill rate (GFR). Increasing your GFR will save you millions of dollars each year. • It’ s not necessary to capitalize the first letters of a phrase just because it will be used as an acronym; for example, generic fill rate (GFR) NOT Generic Fill Rate (GFR). • Don’t begin a sentence with an abbreviation or acronym. • Avoid abbreviations and acronyms in titles and headings. • Always abbreviate (and use periods in): Dr., Mr., Mrs., Ms., Jr., Sr., a.m., p.m. Academic Degrees • Use an apostrophe when referring informally to an academic degree, (for example, bachelor’s degree, a master’s). Exception: Don’t use an apostrophe when referring informally to the associate degree. • Don’t use apostrophes in formal degree titles (for example, Bachelor of Arts, Master of Science). • Initialcapitalize specific degrees such as Master of Arts, Master of Science, etc. • If abbreviations must be used, capitalize each letter without periods for the following degrees: – Associate of Arts AA – Master of Arts MA – Associate of Science AS – Master of Education ME – Bachelor of Arts BA – Master of Science MS – Bachelor of Science BS • Don’t use periods in MD, MBA, PharmD, PhD, RN, RPh Example: Dan is pursuing a master’s degree and earned a bachelor’s degree in 1998. George has a Master of Science from Cornell. Addresses • Abbreviate Ave., Blvd., and St. when used with a street number; otherwise, spell out. Spell out all other street designations at all times. • Place a comma between the city and the state name; use another comma after the state name, unless ending a sentence. Example: We will drive from Lexington, Kentucky, to Austin, Texas. Revised April 2014 3• Spell out the name of the 50 U.S. states in nearly all cases. The exceptions are street addresses and cases where space is limited. • Use the twoletter postal code abbreviations (for example, MO) only with full addresses that include the ZIP code or in a dateline. • In running text, use the following U.S. city names without the state abbreviation or name: – Atlanta – Houston – Philadelphia – Baltimore – Indianapolis – Phoenix – Boston – Las Vegas – Pittsburgh – Chicago – Los Angeles – St. Louis – Cincinnati – Miami – Salt Lake City – Cleveland – Milwaukee – San Antonio – Dallas – Minneapolis – San Diego – Denver – New Orleans – San Francisco – Detroit – New York – Seattle – Honolulu – Oklahoma City – Washington D.C. Example: Your account management team is located in Bloomington, Minnesota. Our headquarters building is located at the following address: One Express Way St. Louis, MO 63121 a.m. and p.m. When using a.m. or p.m. to denote time, always use lowercase followed by periods. See Times for more on denoting the time of day. e.g. • This is an abbreviation for the Latin exempli gratia, meaning “for example.” T o avoid confusion, use “for example” instead of “e.g.” in all member and business communications. Exception: The abbreviation “e.g.” may be used in footnotes and tables in member and business communications as needed; the Drug Trend Report is an example. The term is always lowercase and followed by a comma. Express Scripts, ES, ESI Use Express Scripts instead of the abbreviations “ES” or “ESI” in nearly all cases. NOTE: For proposals, see Client Proposals Exceptions. Revised April 2014 4Units of Measure • When preceded by a numeral, abbreviate metric forms for weights and measures at first mention, without spelling them out (cm, g, kg, L, m, mg, mL and mm). There is no space between the amount and the abbreviated metric unit of measure. Example: Take 10mL in the morning. The medicine is prescribed in milliliters. • Don’t abbreviate nonmetric measurements such as inch, foot, yard, pound, ounce, quart, mile, minute, hour, second, day, week, month, year, or units of weight (pounds, ounces, etc.), except in tables. • When stating millions or billions in general terms, always use a numeral followed by the word million or billion. Use numerals only when stating a specific number. Don’t use abbreviations for millions (“M”) or billions (“B”) except in tables. Example: Express Scripts serves more than 4 million members. We shipped 381,235,200 prescriptions in 2013. • T o denote a range, repeat the unit of measure and use “to.” Don’t use a hyphen or en dash to represent a range. Example: 8cm to 10cm Back to Style Guide Contents Revised April 2014 5Capitalization • Avoid using all uppercase in text. • Capitalize the first word of each entry in lists (including bulleted lists) and outlines. • When spelling out an abbreviated term, don’t capitalize the words from which the abbreviation is derived. Example: Our maximum reimbursement amount (MRA) list is proprietary. • When using the word “web” as part of a compound, use lowercase. Examples: website, webpage, webcam, webenabled • When using the word “Web” as a standalone term, use an initial capital (“W”). Example: You can find numerous references on the Web. • Capitalize geographic regions: Midwest, Midwestern, Middle East, Southeast Asia, etc. • Lowercase compass directions: north, east, southwest, etc. • Lowercase seasons: winter, spring, summer, fall. Departments, Divisions and Programs • Capitalize the names of all Express Scripts departments, divisions and programs. Examples: Human Resources, Legal, Corporate Communications, Sales Marketing • Use lowercase for names of departments at other companies or names in general use. • Don’t use department or division as part of the name unless needed for clarity; in these cases, don’t capitalize the name. • In general, don’t capitalize the term board of directors. However, capitalize on the first reference to the Express Scripts Board of Directors. In subsequent references, lowercase and use only board. Example: The Express Scripts Board of Directors met last night. The board filed this report. • Don’t use program as part of a name unless needed for clarity; in these cases, don’t capitalize program. • Capitalize terms that refer to specific Express Scripts programs. Do not capitalize terms that refer to general concepts. Example: Express Scripts Prior Authorization ensures appropriate drug coverage while maintaining member and physician satisfaction. Physicians can request prior authorizations from Express Scripts electronically or via phone. Revised April 2014 6 NOTE: To help decide whether to capitalize a term, try adding “program” after the word or phrase. If it works in the sentence, the term should generally be capitalized. If it does not, use lowercase. Examples: Express Scripts Prior Authorization program monitors the dispensing of high cost medications and those with the potential for misuse. Our team reviews most prior authorizations within 48 hours of receipt. Drug and Disease Names • Use initial capitals for drug brand names; use lowercase for generic names. – In materials concerning a specific patented drug for which there is only one brand name, use the brand name followed by the generic name in parentheses at first mention. Thereafter, use only the brand name. – In materials concerning a medication that is sold under several brand names, use the generic name followed by the brand name (or names) in parentheses at first mention. Thereafter, use only the generic name. ® ™ – In body text, include the registered ( ) or trademark ( ) symbol on the first mention of a brandname drug. Most brandname drugs are followed by a registered trademark ® symbol ( ); search the Internet to find the correct symbol for a drug. Don’t use these symbols in headings. – If boldface, italic or similar type treatment is used, treat brandname and generic drug names the same as surrounding text. • Don’t capitalize disease names unless they are known by a proper name; in these cases, capitalize only the proper name. Examples: arthritis, leukemia, cancer Parkinson’s disease, Down syndrome, Alzheimer’s disease Headings and Subheadings • Avoid abbreviations and acronyms in titles and headings. • If the document style uses capitalization in headings, capitalize all words except: – Articles (the, a, an) – Conjunctions (and, but, nor, or, yet) – The word to in an infinitive – Prepositions of fewer than four letters (at, by, for, in, of, on, out, to) Exceptions: Capitalize the word “If.” Forms of the verb “to be” are capitalized (for example, Is and Are). Revised April 2014 7• In hyphenated compounds, capitalize both elements. Example: SelfCare Job Titles • Capitalize formal titles when used immediately before a name or in a signature block. Example: Vice President Kenneth Jones • Lowercase formal titles when used alone or set off from a name by commas. Examples: Jones served as vice president for eight years. George Paz, chairman CEO • Always use lowercase for terms that are job descriptions rather than formal titles. Example: Several vice presidents of Human Resources were recognized for excellence. • Express Scripts Leadership Team – George Paz ........................... chairman CEO – Tim Wentworth ..................... president – Keith Ebling ......................... executive vice president general counsel – Chris Houston ...................... senior vice president, Operations – Ed Ignaczak ......................... executive vice president, Sales Marketing – Steve Miller, MD ................... senior vice president chief medical officer – David Norton ........................ senior vice president, Supply Chain Management – Cathy Smith ......................... executive vice president chief financial officer – Glen Stettin, MD .................. senior vice president, Clinical, Research New Solutions – Sara Wade ........................... senior vice president chief human resources officer – Gary Wimberly ...................... senior vice president chief information officer Back to Style Guide Contents Revised April 2014 8Formatting Use block formatting for all body text. Don’t indent the first line of a paragraph. In business communications, justify left with ragged right; don’t use full justification. Allow an extra line space between paragraphs. Boldface • Use bold sparingly for important headings, words or phrases. • When appropriate, use boldface at the beginning of list items so text can be scanned more easily. Example: Order New Prescriptions: Fill your new prescriptions through the Express Scripts Pharmacy. Refill Prescriptions: Order refills for prescriptions previously filled by the Express Scripts Pharmacy. Bulleted Lists • List items alphabetically unless there is a specific reason to do otherwise. • Don’t use a bullet symbol if there is only one list item (or subbullet) point. In these cases, sentences should be recast to avoid the singleitem list. • Begin each item in a bulleted list with an uppercase letter. • Don’t use semicolons or conjunctions after bulleted items; end items with periods only if they are complete sentences. • Bulleted list items should be grammatically consistent (all phrases or all complete sentences) with consistent end punctuation. Example: The benefit plan includes: – Step therapy – Prior authorization – Home delivery • When writing instructions, use numbered lists. Example: To change your user name: 1. Log into the website. 2. Click the Profile button. 3. Select Change User Name. Revised April 2014 9• Use the hanging indent style (allowing space between bullet symbol and text). NOTE: For proposals, see Client Proposals Exceptions. • Use a colon at the end of a phrase that introduces a list. Example: The formulary included: – Generics – Preferred brands – Nonpreferred brands Copyright Line • Place the copyright line at the bottom of letters or other materials meant for mass mailings to members. Don’t insert the copyright line in a letter or email going to an individual. • Use the copyright line in marketing materials, publications, etc. • The copyright symbol is followed by the year, with a space between the two. • There is a period and one space between Company and All, as well as between Reserved and the job number. (There is no period after the job number.) • T ext in a copyright line should be no smaller than five points should be run horizontally. If space is limited, stack the lines to create a vertical format, as shown below. Horizontal Format: © 2014 Express Scripts Holding Company. All Rights Reserved. 1412345 Vertical Format: © 2014 Express Scripts Holding Company. All Rights Reserved. 1412345 Dates • For times, dates and places of events, state the time of day first, the date (omit the year unless it is not the current year), and then the place. Add the day of the week only if necessary for clarification. Example: The meeting is at 9 a.m., Mon., April 30, in Room A. – When using a month with a specific date, abbreviate only these months: – January (Jan.) – October (Oct.) – February (Feb.) – November (Nov.) – August (Aug.) – December (Dec.) – September (Sept.) Revised April 2014 10• Spell out the month when using it alone or with only the year . Don’t use a comma between the month and year. Example: The 2014 report will appear in May. The last report is dated November 2013. • When stating a span of years, use the word to, not an en dash. Example: 2012 to 2013 • When stating a span of days, use the word to. Exception: In display copy, use an en dash with a space on either side. Example: In text: Nov. 8 to Dec. 12 In display copy: Nov. 8 ¬ Dec.12 • Don’t use numbers to express ordinals (for example, 1st, 11th). • Don’t include the day of the week unless needed for clarity. • When abbreviating calendar quarters, use Q1 2014, Q2 2014, and so forth. NOTE: For proposals, see Client Proposals Exceptions. Fractions • In text, spell out fractions less than 1. For fractions larger than 1 or in tables, convert fractions to decimals or percentages. Examples: onethird; 1.02 • If precision is not required, use phrases like a half or a third. • For Units of Measure standards, see Abbreviations and Acronyms. Headings • Use headings, subheadings, section breaks and bulleted lists where appropriate to help readers scan text. • Headings normally are leftaligned. They usually are not justified. • Do not break words in a heading over two lines. • When using subheadings under a main heading, try to include at least two. If you have only one subheading, you may need to rethink your main heading or the overall organization of the section. • Regardless of the heading level, separate headings from body text. Don’t run heading text into the paragraph that follows it. Example: Generics Generics are safe and effective … Revised April 2014 11• Use colons, not dashes, before subtitles within a heading. Example: Product of the Month: Select Home Delivery • In general, avoid abbreviations in headings unless the unabbreviated form is too long. Never introduce an abbreviation in a heading. See also Headings and Subheadings in Capitalization. HIPAA statement for PBM communications • Use either of two variable options or the umbrella option, as appropriate. Examples: Express Scripts manages your prescription benefit for your employer , plan sponsor or health plan. Express Scripts manages your prescription benefit for Client Name. Express Scripts manages your prescription benefit for your employer, plan sponsor, health plan or benefit fund. NOTE: If a client has a custom HIP AA statement, the statement should be revised to accommodate current branding. HIPAA statement for pharmacy communications Use the approved line. Example: Express Scripts is your provider of home delivery pharmacy services. Italics • Don’t italicize entire copy blocks. • Don’t italicize names of websites, Web addresses, email addresses or links. • Follow current AP style and do not use italics for the names of: – Books – Magazines – Plays – Movies – Newsletters – Television shows – Journals – Newspapers – Works of art (paintings, drawings, sculptures) Revised April 2014 12• Don’t italicize foreign words and phrases. • In general, don’t use italics for the titles and names of Express Scripts product offerings, unless part of the proper name. Examples: The Express Way Values EGWP Plus Numbers • Rule of Nines: Numbers one through nine should be written out; numbers 10 and above should appear as numerals. Exception: Measures of time given in seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, months or years are among the exceptions to the general guideline to spell out zero through nine. Examples: 4minute mile 8 hours 5 business days 1 calendar year • Use hyphens with numbers to form compound modifiers (for example, 11yearold; 10foot pole; 30day supply). • If two numbers are adjacent, spell out the first (for example, eleven 50yearolds). • Write out dimensions (2 feet by 4 feet, not 2’ x 4’). • Don’t begin sentences with numerals. For example, instead of “995 clients used the Express Advantage Network in 2013,” you could say, “During 2013, 995 clients used the Express Advantage Network.” Exception: You can begin a sentence with a year. For example: ”2013 was a great year for Express Scripts.” NOTE: For proposals, see Client Proposals Exceptions. Numerical Ranges • When stating a range, include the symbol or unit of measure with both numerals. Example: 6 to 10 • When stating a range in text, use the word to, not an en dash. Examples: Nov. 8 to Nov. 12, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. 12 million to 14 million • When stating a range in display copy, use an en dash with a space on either side. Exception: Always use to in a range of years. Example: The treatment should be maintained for two to three years. Revised April 2014 13Return Address • Use “Express Scripts” on the first (addressee) line (not “Express Scripts Holding Company,” as in the copyright line or notice). Telephone Numbers • Use area codes with all phone numbers; do not use a 1 before the number. • Use periods, not hyphens, as separators in telephone numbers. T o state an extension number, use a comma to separate the main number from the extension. NOTE: Use a lowercase e in ext. The format for an Express Scripts sixdigit extension is 12.3456. Example: 314.781.9774, ext. 36.1204 • When stating a tollfree number , indicate that it is toll free on first use. Don’t hyphenate “toll free” unless it modifies “number.” Examples: Call us toll free at 866.234.2001. Call the tollfree number on your member ID card. Times • Always state times as numerals. • Use lowercase and periods for a.m. and p.m.; leave a space between the number and a.m. or p.m. • Avoid redundancies like “10 a.m. this morning.” • When stating a time that falls on the hour, don’t use “:00” or “o’clock.” • Use midnight and noon instead of 12 a.m. and 12 p.m., respectively. Time Ranges When stating time ranges in paragraph text, use to between the times. If the range appears in a table and is not part of a sentence, use the en dash. Example: Your account management team is available from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. to handle your calls. The table below lists the hours of operation of the Express Scripts Pharmacy: Express Scripts Pharmacy Hours of Operation 7 a.m. – midnight Eastern 3684 Marshall Lane Mon. through Fri., Philadelphia, PA 18940 7 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Eastern 800.955.4879 Sat. and Sun. Revised April 2014 14• Use a.m. and p.m. after both times in a range, even if both times are in the same half of the day. Example: The training session will run from 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Time Zones Capitalize and spell out time zones (Central, Eastern, Mountain, Pacific ). Don’t use “standard” or “daylight.” Example: Our paper claims facilities’ hours of operation are 5:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mon. through Fri., Central. Underlining • Don’t underline to emphasize a word in text; if emphasis is necessary , use bold and/or italics. • Don’t underline copy blocks. • Don’t underline Web addresses in print. URLs • In most cases, Web addresses should be lowercase. Exception: The Express Scripts website should always appear with initial caps as ExpressScripts.com. • Don’t use http:// before www. • If possible, avoid line breaks in a Web address. • In most cases, don’t style Web addresses in boldface for printed publications. Exception: The Express Scripts website may be styled in boldface for emphasis in printed copy that calls readers to visit the site. Word Wrap – for print materials only • Avoid breaking the following on separate lines: – Proper nouns (company names, personal names) – Numbers and abbreviations or symbols used with them – Lines ending in articles such as the, and, of – Phrase or clause (home delivery, specialty drugs, step therapy) – Infinitive verbs (to go, to purchase, etc.) – Web addresses – Words across multiple lines in headings Revised April 2014 15• Insert soft returns (SHIFT+ENTER) to neaten ragged edges. Tip: T o insert a nonbreaking space to keep words or the periods in an ellipsis together on the same line, use the Insert option in the Microsoft Word menu bar to select Symbol. Choose Special Characters, and then choose Nonbreaking space. The keyboard shortcut for a nonbreaking space is to simultaneously press the Control and Shift buttons and the space bar (Ctrl+Shift+space). Back to Style Guide Contents Revised April 2014 16Punctuation Use only one space after punctuation at the end of a sentence (periods, exclamation points, question marks), commas, colons and semicolons. Colon • Use a colon to introduce lists of items (for example: bulleted lists, tables, figures). Use only one space after a colon. • Capitalize the first word after a colon only if the word is in a heading, starts a complete sentence or is a proper noun. Comma • In a series, use a comma to separate the elements; do not use a comma before a conjunction (serial comma). Example: The flag is red, white and blue. • Use a comma in numbers with four or more digits (for example, 1,000). • Use commas between two units of similar dimension. Example: The baby weighed 7 pounds, 5 ounces; he was 1 foot, 8 inches long. • Always place commas inside quotation marks. Example: “Our study has found that patient adherence continues to be an issue,” said Dr. Smith. NOTE: For proposals, see Client Proposals Exceptions. Em Dash Use em dashes (not double hyphens) to interrupt the sequence of a sentence or to show dramatic contrast or emphasis. Em dashes are especially helpful if there is a series of commas in the sentence. Example: All these factors – age, weight and sex – determine the health risk. • In body text, leave one space both before and after the em dash (see the example above). • Avoid em dashes in headlines and subheadings. Use colons instead. • T o add an em dash in Microsoft Word, use Ctrl+Alt+(hyphen). As an alternative, use Insert Symbol More Symbols Special Characters tab Em Dash. You can also use custom settings to designate a particular keyboard command to insert em dashes. Revised April 2014 17En Dash See Numerical Ranges. Exclamation Mark Don’t use the exclamation mark in business writing. Hyphen When using a compound modifier (two or more words that express a single concept) before a noun, use a hyphen to link the words in the compound, unless one of the modifiers is an adverb ending in “ly.” A compound modifier can also come after the verb when the verb is a form of “to be.” Examples: betterqualified applicant, highly qualified applicant Exception: Do NOT hyphenate “home delivery” • Don’t hyphenate compound modifiers that are not used before nouns. Examples: She is a fulltime worker. She works full time. He is a wellknown man. The man is well known. She is a twoweekold baby. The baby is two weeks old. Call the tollfree number. The phone number is toll free. • If two or more hyphenated compounds have a common base, include the base in all compounds. Example: seconddegree and thirddegree burns (not second and thirddegree burns) Retain the hyphen when using the prefix “co“ to form words that indicate occupation or status, or when omitting it would result in an ambiguous reading. Omit the hyphen in all other cases. Examples: coworker, costar, copilot Examples: coexist, copayment • Use the word to instead of the hyphen in number ranges. NOTE: To avoid confusion, use the unit of measure with both elements in a range. Examples: 10mg to 20mg; 3 million to 45 million (differentiate from three to 45 million) Periods Use a period to end a complete sentence. Use only a single space between sentences. • Don’t end list items with periods unless they are complete sentences. • Always place periods inside quotation marks. Example: “We’re searching for ways to improve adherence without causing a disruption.” Revised April 2014 18Semicolons Use semicolons to separate list items when there are commas within each list item itself. Example: Bob Jones, 84; Jane Jones, 89; and Sam Roberts, 90 Quotation Marks Always place periods and commas inside quotation marks. Place semicolons and question marks outside quotation marks unless they are part of the quote. Examples: “Our study has found that patient adherence continues to be an issue,” said Dr. Smith. “We’re searching for ways to improve adherence without causing a disruption.” People might say that “prescriptions are too complicated”; this problem affects us all. When they say “I can’t take them,” it drives me crazy. Back to Style Guide Contents Revised April 2014 19Symbols Ampersand Although it is the symbol form of the word “and,” an ampersand is not a substitute for the word except in these specific cases: – As part of a legal name (for example, Abercrombie Fitch) – Where space is limited (for example, in a small advertisement or headline) – For artistic purposes (for example, in a logo) – In some academic references (for example, Burke Edison, 2002) – In Express Scripts titles and department names (for example, executive vice president president; Sales Marketing) Asterisk • Use an asterisk () in body text to indicate a single footnote that provides additional information or clarification. • Use superscripted numbers to denote two or more footnotes. (Medicare Part D style is an exception to this rule.) • When combining an asterisk with other punctuation, place the asterisk after every punctuation mark except a dash. (“at”) Use the typographic character (“at”) only in email addresses or Twitter accounts. Emoticons Don’t use emoticons in business writing. Money • Denote dollar amounts with a dollar sign () and numerals. Examples: 150 (not 150 dollars), 5.78 and 10.05 She spent 5 on candy and 15 on ice cream. • Don’t use the dollar sign with the word dollar. Example: 2 million dollars (incorrect) • In text blocks, omit .00; in tables, use .00. • Spell out “cents”. Don’t use the cent symbol (¢). Example: She spent 65 cents on soda. Revised April 2014 20• Use commas in dollar amounts in the thousands, and specific figures for dollar amounts beyond thousands. Examples: 3,000 (not 3000) 4,343,067 • For dollar amounts beyond thousands, use the dollar sign, a numeral and the appropriate word. Example: 14 million (not 14,000,000) 4 million (not four million) 4,343,067 Number (Pound) Sign The number or pound sign () is often used for counting or ranking lists, especially in names and titles. The “No.” abbreviation can be used in place of a number sign. Example: No. 2 Percent and Percentages Always use numerals to show percentages unless the number begins a sentence. Always use the percent symbol () with a numeral. Repeat the symbol for each numeral when showing a range. Registered Mark, Service Mark and Trademark Symbols Please refer to Microsoft Word Help for a list of keyboard short cuts for symbols. • Use a trademark symbol at first reference to a trademark in a document. The trademark symbol should not be used in subsequent references. • Do not use trademark symbols in headings or headlines. • These symbols should always be superscripted. Use the superscript option from the Font menu. • V isit the Express Scripts website for a complete list of U.S. and Canadian Express Scripts trademarks. SM Examples: Through our proprietary platform, Health Decision Science , and accompanying solutions, we’re helping more people achieve better health with safer and more effective care. Our targeted suite of behavioral sciencebased communications, ® SM My Rx Choices , drives greater utilization of the Express Scripts Pharmacy . Back to Style Guide Contents Revised April 2014 21Words and Wording Express Scripts Approved Terms and Spellings Note: Use spellings in W ebster’s New World Collegiate Dictionary unless otherwise indicated here. Accredo ® Do not use the registered trademark symbol ( ) with the Accredo name in text; the symbol should appear only in actual logotype. Example: First mention of Accredo when a footer is used: Accredo, an Express Scripts specialty pharmacy, ... Footer: Accredo Health Group, Inc. is an Express Scripts specialty pharmacy . © 2014 Express Scripts Holding Company. All Rights Reserved. Example: First mention of Accredo when a footer is not being used: Accredo Health Group, Inc., an Express Scripts specialty pharmacy, ... and/or Avoid using this nonstandard conjunction; in most cases, or implies “and/or.” beforetax contributions Hyphenate as shown; do not use “pretax.” beneficiary ® Use this term instead of “member” when writing for Department of Defense TRICARE . bioequivalents, biogenerics, biosimilars Each is one word with no hyphenation. caregiver Use as one word with no hyphen. cobranded Use as one word with no hyphen (not “cobranded”). companywide Use as one word with no hyphen. consumerdirected healthcare Hyphenate as shown above. Revised April 2014 22® Consumerology Use registered trademark symbol as shown above on first reference in text, except when referring to Consumerology in Canada (see below). SM Consumerology Use the service mark as shown here only when referencing Consumerology in Canada. Contact Center Note capitalization. Do not use call center, MCC or PCCC. copayment Always write as one word with no hyphen. Do not use “copayment,” “copay” or “copay.” COX2 Do not use COXII. CVS Caremark Do not use Caremark alone. day’s supply Use when writing about the supply for a single day. days’ supply Use when writing about the supply for multiple days. doctor Use in member communications; use “physician” in other audience segments. donut hole Reference to Medicare Part D coverage gap; not doughnut. ebusiness, ecommerce, eprescribing Each should be hyphenated. email Lowercase unless it is the first word of a sentence; no hyphen. Revised April 2014 23e.g. Do not use in member communications, except in tables, and business communications as needed. See the Abbreviations and Acronyms section for more information. etc. or et cetera Do not use this term. Exclusive Home Delivery Do not use mandatory mail, retail refill allowance, RRA. Express Advantage Network ® ExpressAlliance Express Preview Express Scripts Use Express Scripts instead of the abbreviations “ES” or “ESI” in nearly all cases. Express Scripts’ Avoid using the possessive form of Express Scripts; rewrite when possible and use only when it’s grammatically incorrect not to do so (“Express Scripts’ role in the PBM marketplace”). For proposals, see Client Proposals Exceptions. ExpressScripts.com Do not write as “www.ExpressScripts.com.” (When spelling aloud, pronounce as “ExpresshyphenScriptsdotcom,” not “ExpressdashScriptsdotcom.”) Express Scripts Holding Company Use this name in the copyright line only; do not use in a return address. Express Scripts Lab • Use this term on first reference; subsequent references may refer to the Lab. • Do not use “Express Scripts Research New Solutions Lab.” ® Express Scripts Medicare ® Use registered trademark symbol ( ) on first reference in text. Revised April 2014 24SM Express Scripts Pharmacy SM • Use service mark symbol ( ) on first reference in text. • Do not use Express Scripts’ Pharmacy, Express Scripts Mail Order Pharmacy, Express Scripts Mail Service Pharmacy, Mail Service Pharmacy or any variations thereof. Express Scripts Technology Innovation Center • Use full name on first reference • Use T echnology Innovation Center or the Center on subsequent reference; (lowercase “the” unless it begins a sentence) • Do not use Pharmacy Technology Innovation Center, acronyms (PTIC, TIC) or St. Louis Center. fewer, less Use fewer for individual items, less for bulk or quantity. Examples: Fewer than 10 clients use onsite pharmacies. We have seen less demand for such facilities recently. followup Hyphenate the noun and adjective versions. When used as a verb, there should be no hyphen. Examples: The followup meeting will occur later. The account manager will follow up with the client later. Fraud, Waste Abuse May be identified as FWA on subsequent reference if the acronym follows the spelledout version in parentheses at the first mention. SM Health Decision Science Use superscripted SM on first reference in text. healthcare Write as a single compound for all purposes, whether used as a noun or an adjective. HIPAA Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act Statement for PBM communications: Express Scripts manages your prescription benefit for your employer, plan sponsor, health plan or benefit fund. Revised April 2014 25Statement for pharmacy communications: Express Scripts is your provider of home delivery pharmacy services. HITECH Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act HR Express Way home delivery • Do not use initial caps unless used as part of a program name (for example, Exclusive Home Delivery) or with reference to the TRICARE benefit. • Do not use these alternative terms: mail order, mail service benefit, maintenance medication program. • Do not hyphenate when used as a descriptor (home delivery service). ID card Do not use “ID card” alone; use member ID card. NOTE: Not all clients issue member ID cards. For those clients, special language may be necessary. i.e. Do not use in member or business communications, except as needed in tables and footnotes. Ignite Symposium Initial cap as shown above in all articles, etc. igniteyear Logo version of Ignite Symposium indication Refer to the medical indication (for example, your medication for depression), not the drug class (antidepressants). InfoExpress Use this term to refer to employee information posted on bulletin boards at Express Scripts facilities. Revised April 2014 26in order to Do not use; use to. inpatient Internet Always capitalize the “I” intranet Lowercase “i” its, it’s “Its” is the possessive pronoun; “it’s” is the contraction of “it is.” Lab, the • On first reference, use the Express Scripts Lab; on subsequent reference, use the Lab. • Do not use “The Express Scripts Research New Solutions Lab.” lifestyle log in at, log on at • Write the verb form as shown above; the noun form is one word (login; logon). • Do not use “sign in” or “sign on.” maintenance medication • Use this term to refer to the prescription drugs members take regularly for ongoing conditions. • Do not use “longterm medication” or “ongoing medication.” member • Do not use “customer.” “Patient” is acceptable in communications to physicians. ® • Use beneficiary when writing for TRICARE . member ID card Do not use “insurance card,” “pharmacy benefit card,” “prescription card” or “ID card.” nationwide nonadherence/nonadherent Revised April 2014 27nonformulary nonpreferred offline offsite ongoing online onscreen onsite outpatient patient • Use in communications with physicians only; for all others, use member (when writing for TRICARE, use beneficiary). • Do not use “customer.” patient assistance program patient care advocate This is the job title for those who answer the phone at the Contact Center. Customer Service or Member Service is used when speaking to Medicare members. • Always use this title on first reference in Accredo communications; use advocate on subsequent references. • In communications that direct members to the Member Choice Center (MCC), such as retailtomail conversion programs, use prescription benefit specialist . • Do not use “PCA,” “call center representative” or “customer service representative.” PDF This acronym is acceptable in all cases; do not use periods. pharmacy • Use participating pharmacy, network pharmacy or retail pharmacy. • Do not use “drug store” (except when writing at fourthgrade level for Medicaid) or “neighborhood pharmacy.” Revised April 2014 28pharmacy benefit ( nonmember facing) Always use “pharmacy benefit” in communications for nonmembers. Do not use “prescription coverage benefit,” “prescriptiondrug benefit” or “prescription plan benefit.” Pharmacy Benefit Manager (PBM) Use this term in general descriptions of Express Scripts. Add PBM in parentheses at first reference and use the abbreviation alone for subsequent references. physician Do not use in member communications; use doctor instead; use is permissible for other audience segments. plan sponsor Use in member communications only; do not use “benefit provider,” “health plan,” “plan” or “provider.” pointofsale Use hyphens only in the adjective form; do not use hyphens in the noun form. Example: Customers experienced no disruption at the point of sale. policymaker preferred pharmacy network Always use lowercase; formerly Express Option Network. prescription benefit ( member facing) Do not use “pharmacy benefit,” “prescription coverage,” “prescriptiondrug benefit” or “prescription plan” in memberfacing communications. prescription benefit network Always use lowercase; for use in commercial communications only; do not use in specialty communications. prescription benefit specialist This is the job title for Member Choice Center (MCC) employees; use this term in communications that direct members to call the MCC about converting from retail to mail. Revised April 2014 29Pricing Supplement This is the common title for the standard Express Scripts pricing document. (It’s also known as the “Cost Quote” or “Pricing Proposal” internally.) NOTE: For proposals, see Client Proposals Exceptions. primary cardholder Do not use “cardholder,” “policy holder” or “subscriber.” prior authorization • Do not capitalize this term except in headlines, initialcapped lists or program names. • Do not use the abbreviation “PA” unless there are character limitations. Example: Physicians and pharmacists have easy access to prior authorization information. • The term “coverage review” is more acceptable in member communications. When possible, introduce “coverage review” with the first mention of prior authorization and use on subsequent references. Example: Your doctor may need to obtain a type of coverage review known as “prior authorization.” This coverage review will … prior to Do not use this phrase; instead, use before. PT Committee On the first reference, use the full title, the National Pharmacy Therapeutics Committee, and place the abbreviation PT in parentheses after “Pharmacy Therapeutics.” For all subsequent references, use the term “PT Committee” (note ampersand). • Avoid alternate terms like “the committee” and “the National PT Committee.” • When referring to a client’s PT committee, lowercase the word “committee.” Examples: The National Pharmacy Therapeutics (PT) Committee operates according to a set of high standards. Members of the PT Committee are not employed by, under contract with, or affiliated in any way with pharmaceutical manufacturers. Express Scripts requires that the client have its own PT committee in order to create a custom formulary. real time (noun); realtime (adjective) Revised April 2014 30self Note hyphen. Examples: selfservice, selfcare set up (verb); setup (noun) shortterm care specialist pharmacist Do not capitalize this term except when used within headlines or initialcapped lists. step therapy Do not capitalize this term except when used in headlines, initialcapped lists or program names. Do not use the abbreviation “ST” unless there are character limitations. Example: Step therapy takes advantage of these opportunities to direct a new patient to a clinically effective, lowercost medication. thirdparty administrator (TPA) threetier copayment structure time frame Always spell as two words (no hyphen). timeline toolkit Always spell as one word; never use a hyphen. upsell, upselling Always spell as one word whether used as a noun or a verb. use/utilize “Use” is preferred unless specifically referring to drug utilization. voice mail Always spell as two words. Back to Style Guide Contents Revised April 2014 31Appendix: Client Proposals Exceptions Bulleted Lists Client Proposals uses its own template styles for bulleted lists. With the exception of these formatting variations, follow corporate style for lists. Comma In a series, use a comma to separate the elements, including a comma before a conjunction (serial comma). Example: The flag is red, white, and blue. Dates In proposals, spell out the names of days and months in all instances. Otherwise, follow corporate style regarding dates. Express Scripts’ Use the possessive form of Express Scripts whenever grammatically appropriate. NOTE: It’ s sometimes tricky to determine whether to use the possessive because the company name ends in an “S”; if you are unsure, trying mentally swapping out “Express Scripts” with another company name to test if the possessive is appropriate. Express Scripts, ES, ESI Use Express Scripts instead of the abbreviations “ES” or “ESI” in nearly all cases. Rare exceptions may be made in contract language or in RFPs with severe character limitations. Numbers Rule of Nines: Numbers one through nine should always be written out; numbers 10 and above should always appear as numerals. There are no exceptions for measures of time. Otherwise, follow corporate style regarding numbers. Pricing Supplement This is the common title for the standard Express Scripts pricing document. It’s also known as the “Cost Quote” or “Pricing Proposal” internally. When referring to this document in proposals, always use the term “Pricing Supplement” and use exhibit font (Tahoma 10, template blue, bold, italic) to make it stand out in responses. Example: Please refer to the enclosed Pricing Supplement for more details on our fees. Back to Style Guide Contents Revised April 2014 32
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