How to make Resume good

how to build resume with experience and how to make good resume for fresher engineer
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Published Date:03-07-2017
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Creating an Creating an Effective Résumé Effective Résumé Alumni Career Services Bucknell University Botany Building (570) 577-1238 acsbucknell.edu www.bucknell.edu/alumnicareerservices Career Development Center Contents Rule of Thumb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 .... What is a Résumé? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ..... Why Do I Need A Résumé? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 .... Résumé Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ..... Sample Chronological Résumés . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ..... Sample Combination Résumés . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 .. ... Résumé Building Tips for Success . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 ..... Parts of the Résumé. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 .. Identification and Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Showcasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Worksheet - Showcase Your Accomplishments . . . . . . . . . . 15 Skill Clusters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Career Transferable Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Employment History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Additional Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Make Sure You’re resume don’s have mistakes. . . . . . . . . . . 27 Résumé Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Résumé Critique Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Electronic Résumés . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Sample Electronic Résumé . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 References – Why Have Them?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Sample Reference Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 . Cover Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 . Cover Letter Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 . 39 Sample Cover Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover Letter Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 What Is a Thank You Letter? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Sample Thank You Letter – Block Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 . 2 What is a Résumé ? IT IS NOT ™ Your Autobiography ™ Your Complete Obituary IT IS ™ A Document Starting Your Professional Credentials ITS PURPOSE IS ™ Not to Obtain a job ™ To Obtain an Interview (YOU get the job) Your Résumé Is Your Advertisement In most instances your résumé is your first contact with an employer. Make sure that it gives a positive, professional impression. Your résumé is your advertising tool and should provide: ™ A sense of purpose - Why are you sending the résumé? ™ Focus on achievements - What separates you from everyone else? ™ Accuracy - Was it 2003 or 2004? Find out ™ Clarity and Simplicity - This is not the time to try to use the word antidisestablishmentarianism in a document. ™ An attractive package - No jelly or coffee stains, please. ™ Salesmanship - What measurable facts can you provide? ™ A sense of person behind the resume -This flat piece of paper needs to sing and dance so the employer will want to meet you in person. ™ Credibility - More than 80% of résumés contain some stretch of the truth. Don’t do this. If you lose your professionalism, it will be nearly impossible to get it back. 2Why Do I Need a Résumé ? Employers are contacted by many applicants and have little time to thoroughly screen each applicant. Employers want to know exactly how you can be useful to them without having to read through excessive or unrelated details. A one page résumé is ideal for those with little experience: two pages are maximum for anyone. A résumé should provide a positive impact by being clear, accurate, and relevant to the job objective and focused on one industry or employer. ™ YOU are the best person to write your résumé. ™ In most cases your résumé is your first contact with an employer. ™ Your résumé is a communication tool. Effective communication requires you to be responsible for conveying a clear message. If your reader doesn’t get the information, you didn’t communicate successfully. ™ Your résumé summarizes who you are and what you can do. ™ Your résumé helps the employer decide whether or not to interview you. ™ Your résumé focuses on the employer’s needs, not yours. THE 20 SECOND RULE The personnel directors of America’s top corporations say again and again that if you haven’t presented the most important information about yourself in the top half of the first page of your resume, you can probably forget about getting the job. The head of personnel management for one of the largest and most prestigious employers in the Washington, D.C. area told the authors that she allows 20 seconds to scan each resume she receives. If in that brief time, she does not see anything that gets her attention, she rejects the resume. Taken from The 110 Biggest Mistakes Job Hunters Make by Richard L. Hermann and Linda P. Sutherland Carry résumés with you when you are canvassing companies for job openings. Submit them with your application materials. When you send a résumé by mail or email, always include a cover letter to identify the job for which you are applying, and why the employer should hire you. Keep copies of your résumé in your car and have it available at a moments notice. 3Résumé Formats There are two basic résumé formats that can be used to showcase your talents. Neither one is better than the other and both are acceptable. Choose the format that you feel best showcases your abilities. CHRONOLOGICAL This format is good for people with extensive work experience either with one company or a few companies, usually in the field in which they are seeking employment. Work and educational experience is listed in reverse order of occurrence beginning with the most recent dates and working back. Job duties are listed under the job title, organization and dates. COMBINATION This format is good for career changers, those with gaps in employment and those who want to clearly sell specific skills, paralleling the needs of the employer. This format allows a person to use skill clusters, while still listing dates, places of employment and job responsibilities. This résumé format combines a chronological work experience with skill clusters. The work experience is organized in two separate sections: ™ A skill clusters section, which highlights major areas of accomplishments from previous employment, training and/or education programs. This allows you to organize skills in an order that most supports your job objective. ™ A chronological listing in reverse order containing job title, organization for which you worked, and dates of employment. 4Sample Chronological Résumé John Doe 222 Market Street Lewisburg, PA 17837 570-524-0000 Doejaol.com OBJECTIVE To obtain a position in corporate legal services with ABC Company EDUCATION Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA Bachelor of Arts Anthropology May 2005 RELATED EXPERIENCE Intern 1/05-5/05 Komisarow, Baach & Snouffer, P.C. Milton, PA • Researched new healthcare law • Balanced firm's general ledger, handled press releases and various administrative responsibilities Teaching Assistant, Introduction to Law 8/04-5/05 Bucknell University Lewisburg, PA • Evaluated 60 students on weekly papers • Led class discussions one day per week • Assisted professor with creating and evaluating exams WORK EXPERIENCE Manager 11/01-5/03 Lewisburg Freez Lewisburg, PA • Trained, reviewed, and supervised 20 employees • Evaluated and ordered 100,000 inventory • Balanced four cash drawers and made nightly deposits LANGUAGES • Fluent in Spanish • Microsoft Office, Macromedia Dreamweaver and Flash, Adobe Photoshop ACTIVITIES Volunteer, Sunsine Nursing Home 6/02- present Member, Phi Theta Kappa 8/03 – present 5Sample Chronological Résumé Jane Doe 1000 Anywhere Street Anywhere, NY 10014 (212) 555-1212 doejhotmail.com EXECUTIVE SUMMARY • Dynamic, award-winning executive with over 12 years of proven success creating and launching new products for domestic and international markets. • Led team of 55 to increase market share by 40%. • Granted patent for innovative communication tool used to acquire new clients. • Skilled in reducing marketing costs, managing cross-functional teams, and administering multi-billion dollar budgets. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE XYZ Corporation, New York, NY 2000-present Division Manager, Marketing Strategy and Development • Direct strategic planning of Internet and high speed access services with 1.7 billion annual revenue • Create, track, and evaluate internal metrics and management reporting to identify marketing performance and effectiveness of programs, markets, and product mix. • Analyze industry trends and competitive landscapes. • Oversee opportunity identification and evaluation; construct business cases; formulate new offers and promotions. • Increased market share by 40% in local voice service launch leveraging switch resale, cable, and wireless technologies • Drive branding guidelines across the organization and with external partners. ABC Corporation, Boston, MA 1993-2000 Marketing and Sales Director, Consumer Services 1995-2000 • Developed strategic business plan for new venture into consumer DSL broadband service. • Led team of 20 in launch of new high-speed internet services, including customer identification, sales planning, channel mix, pricing, promotion, and customer experience definition. • Directed formation of E-based capabilities, including website, E-sales, E-care, and E- billing/payment • Supervised in-house and outside agency creative staff of 16 in developing logos, website, direct mail, and e-mail acquisition marketing; functioned as point person in external partner negotiations Product Management Director 1993-1995 • Defined operational plans to integrate GGC and TMT following 14 billion acquisition. • Managed 1 billion business unit; led supplier negotiations, oversaw financial and operational results. • Identify marketing initiatives through customer research; develop targeting and segmentation plans. 6Jane Doe Page 2 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE (Continued) Sesame Seed Company 1990-1993 Strategic and Business Planning District Manager • Prepared strategic and business plan communications for presentations to Board of Directors, industry and financial analysts, suppliers, partners, and employees. • Ensured success of new corporate venture by strategizing business plans, cases, and market scenarios. • Supervised 10-person marketing team. ASSOCIATIONS Member, Strategic Account Management Association 2002-present Member, American Marketing Association 1990-present PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION • Vice Presidential Achievement Award, 2005 • Circle of Excellence Award, 2004 • Chosen as representative from 1,000 candidates to attend an Emerging Leaders Program, 2001 • True Spirit Award, 2000 • Patent Incentive Award, 2000 SOFTWARE • Siebel CRM • Macromedia Dreamweaver and Flash • Adobe Photoshop EDUCATION Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA Bachelor of Science Business Administration 7Sample Combination Résumé John Doe 222 Market Street Lewisburg, PA 17837 (570) 524-0000 Doejaol.com Summary of Qualifications • Motivated marketing professional with 12 years of proven success. • Demonstrated ability to assess and address client needs to develop strong client loyalty. • Recipient of two “Employee of the Year” awards • Strong team player with 8 years of management experience. Professional Experience Marketing • Generated a 1,000,000 new client base. • Developed “The Leading Edge” television campaign for Rocko Sports. • Created the Nike “swish.” • Successfully maintain an existing client base of over 100 Fortune 500 companies. Accomplishments • Promoted to Lead Marketing Manager after 6 months in current position. • Recognized by peers and clients for outstanding service, for two consecutive years. • Consistently exceed marketing plan goals by 10 percent per year. Management • Train and supervise a team of 20. • Interviewed, selected and trained 100 volunteers. • Conduct performance reviews and professional development activities. Work History Lead Marketing Manager 2000-Present Market Yourself, Inc., Harrisburg, PA Marketing Manager 1998-2000 Markets-R-Us, New York, NY Marketing Coordinator 1996-1998 American Red Cross, New York, NY Education Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA Bachelor of Arts Sociology Volunteer Experience Big Brothers/Big Sisters 2000-Present Habitat for Humanity 2002 8Sample Combination Résumé Jane Doe 1000 Anywhere Street Anywhere, NY 10014 (212) 555-1212 doejhotmail.com Executive Summary • Dynamic, award-winning executive with over 12 years of proven success creating and launching new products for domestic and international markets. • Led team of 55 to increase market share by 40%. • Granted patent for innovative communication tool used to acquire new clients. • Skilled in reducing marketing costs, managing cross-functional teams, and administering multi-billion dollar budgets. Professional Experience Management • Oversee opportunity identification and evaluation; construct business cases; formulate new offers and promotions. • Supervised in-house and outside agency creative staff of 16 in developing logos, website, direct mail, and e-mail acquisition marketing; functioned as point person in external partner negotiations • Managed 1 billion business unit; led supplier negotiations, oversaw financial and operational results. Strategic Planning • Create, track, and evaluate internal metrics and management reporting to identify marketing performance and effectiveness of programs, markets, and product mix. • Analyze industry trends and competitive landscapes. • Direct strategic planning of Internet and high speed access services with 1.7 billion annual revenue • Ensured success of new corporate venture by strategizing business plans, cases, and market scenarios. • Defined operational plans to integrate GGC and TMT following 14 billion acquisition. Development • Drive branding guidelines across the organization and with external partners. • Directed formation of E-based capabilities, including website, E-sales, E-care, and E- billing/payment • Created strategic business plan for new venture into consumer DSL broadband service. Communication • Supervised 10-person marketing team. • Prepared strategic and business plan communications for presentations to Board of Directors, industry and financial analysts, suppliers, partners, and employees. • Led team of 20 in launch of new high-speed internet services, including customer identification, sales planning, channel mix, pricing, promotion, and customer experience definition. 9Jane Doe Page 2 Work History XYZ Corporation, New York, NY 2000-present Division Manager, Marketing Strategy and Development ABC Corporation, Boston, MA 1993-2000 Marketing and Sales Director, Consumer Services 1995-2000 Product Management Director 1993-1995 Sesame Seed Company 1990-1993 Strategic and Business Planning District Manager Associations Member, Strategic Account Management Association 2002-present Member, American Marketing Association 1990-present Professional Recognition • Vice Presidential Achievement Award, 2005 • Circle of Excellence Award, 2004 • Chosen as representative from 1,000 candidates to attend an Emerging Leaders Program, 2001 • True Spirit Award, 2000 • Patent Incentive Award, 2000 Software • Siebel CRM • Macromedia Dreamweaver and Flash • Adobe Photoshop Education Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA Bachelor of Science Business Administration 10Résumé Building Tips for Success ™ Remember that there is no one correct way to create a résumé. What one person likes, another may not. Ask for a lot of input before deciding on the résumé that is right for you. ™ Keep it to one page unless you have significant experience in your field. If you do have a two page résumé, make sure they are two relatively complete pages. ™ If you will be moving soon, use the two-address format. ™ Keep typeface simple. It’s best to use Times-Roman or Arial. ™ 8 1/2" x 11" white or light colored, good quality paper is best. Avoid flashy “look at me” colors. Use matching paper for cover letter and avoid folding your résumé into a mailing envelope. Send it in a 9" x 11" mailing envelope. ™ Justify the left margin, but not the right. It’s easier to read. ™ Highlight important information (your name, address, and titles of jobs, major categories) with boldface type. ™ Use 11 or 12-point type. Do not use graphics unless you are in the design field. ™ Save it on a computer disk. It’s easier to update and/or change this way. Keep the disk safe, and make a back-up copy. Saving your résumé also lets you make targeted résumés for specific positions to which you are applying. ™ Everything you put in your résumé is fair game for the interview. Be able to discuss every point without having to refer to notes or ask for time to respond to a question. ™ Bring extra résumés to your interview; even if you are sure your interviewer has a copy. ™ Use action words (see page 20) when describing what you have done. Examples include: created, managed, developed, revised, presented, etc. ™ Proof. Proof. Proof. One mistake generally means you’re out the door. The quality of your résumé reflects the quality of your work and professionalism. If you make a mistake on your résumé, will you make a mistake in your job? Employers will think so. ™ Remember the 3-Example Rule: If you list a skill, you need to come up with three examples to support it. ™ Highlight computer/technology knowledge and skills as well as experience working as part of a group or team. 11 12Parts of the Résumé Identification This section should include your name, address, telephone numbers (home, and/or cell phone numbers), and e-mail address. Make sure the employer can reach you, or can leave a message easily. Tips ™ Include area codes with all telephone numbers ™ Make sure your voice mail message or e-mail address is not offensive, unprofessional or “cutesy” ƒ Examples of UNPROFESSIONAL emails: ƒ Studmuffinaol.com ƒ emilyscarletoharahotmail.com ƒ sexychickyahoo.com Objective The objective should tell what you can contribute and demonstrate the value you will add to the organization. The résumé material following the objective should support or prove that you can perform the objective. If you have access to a computer, you can easily change your job objective to suit each employment opportunity. Having an objective is OPTIONAL. If you choose not to use an objective, make sure you refer to the job you are targeting in your cover letter. Sample Strong Objectives ™ A position as a General Sales Representative with Eli Lilly which will utilize my chemistry and sales background. ™ A position in data analysis where skills in mathematics, computer programming, and deductive reasoning will contribute to new systems development. Sample of Weak Objectives ™ Management position which will use my business administration degree and will provide opportunities for rapid advancement and annual salary increases. ™ A public relations position in which I can maximize opportunities to develop and implement programs, organize people and events, communicate positive ideas and images. 13Tips ™ The objective should be as short as possible, and not include such phrases as “challenging position”, “utilizing my skills”, “growth potential”, “room for advancement”, etc. ™ If you are applying for a specific job opening, always use the employer’s job title for that position. ™ If you choose not to use an objective, use a summary statement or qualifications section instead. Showcasing There are two sections of a résumé that are optional, but are excellent ways to showcase your abilities up front. Think of them as a quick snapshot of your best talents. This helps the employer get interested in you quickly Summary Statement When you have a number of years experience in a particular field or industry, this statement is often used as an alternative to an objective or as an addition. It portrays a summary of your credentials in sentence or paragraph form. Example Over ten years of successful experience providing professional customer service. Proven ability to effectively handle difficult situations. Highly motivated, energetic and very creative. Qualifications This section often appears on the résumé to highlight and summarize your areas of expertise, and your credentials, usually including 3 – 5 lines making reference to your Work History, Education and Strengths or Self Management Skills. Examples ™ Recently completed my BS degree in Mechanical Engineering ™ Programming experience in Java, CTT and HTML ™ Fluent in Spanish and Russian Tips ™ Put strong statements at the beginning of your résumé. The most important information should come first. ™ Don’t use the word “I” in any part of your resume. 14Worksheet: Showcase Your Accomplishments Showcasing your abilities can a challenge, because most of us don’t “brag” on a daily basis. However, to successfully communicate your skills to the employer, you need to learn how to “sell” yourself. Take some time to list your accomplishments. Start now, but come back to it later, when you’ve thought of more things. Draw on all your experiences: paid, unpaid, volunteer, and home. Once you have a list you can pick and choose what you want to highlight. There is no right or wrong way to do this, but try to include as much information as possible. If you trained people, how many? The employer doesn’t know your capabilities, so your job is to educate him/her on what you can bring to the position Examples ™ Successfully managed 500,000 accounts receivables and reduced delinquent accounts by 15 percent. ™ Trained over 100 staff members in CPR and First Aid procedures. ™ Developed 35 new accounts while maintaining 60 existing accounts. Accomplishments Keep in mind the variety of experiences you have had which can transfer to other job duties. Following is a list of some skill areas which may help you categorize your skills. 15Skill Clusters (Both transferable skills and special knowledge skill areas) Accountant Management Personnel Accounting Printing Administration Product Development Advertising Production Benefits Public Relations Bookkeeping Purchasing Budgeting Quality Control Business Communication Real Estate Business Management Records Management Client Services Reception Coaching Recruiting Communications Restaurant Management Community Relations Retailing Computer Sales Construction Sheet metal Customer Relations Shipping & Receiving Customer Service Supervision Database Management/Spreadsheets Teaching Drafting Technical Electrical Training Electronic Employee Relations Equipment Maintenance Fabrication Financial Food Preparation Home Remodeling Home Repair Inspection Interviewing Inventory Control Labor Relations Laboratory Maintenance Management Marketing Research Marketing Mechanical Merchandising Negotiation Office Management Payroll 16Career Transferable Skills ™ INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SKILLS: ability to… • sort data and objects • compile and rank information • apply information creatively to specific problems or tasks • synthesize facts, concepts, and principles • understand and use organizing principles • evaluate information against appropriate standards ™ DESIGN AND PLANNING SKILLS: ability to… • identify alternative courses of action • set realistic goals • follow through with a plan or decision • manage time effectively • predict future trends and patterns • accommodate multiple demands for commitment of time, energy and resources • assess needs • make and keep a schedule • set priorities ™ RESEARCH AND INVESTIGATION SKILLS: ability to… • use a variety of sources of information • apply a variety of sources of information • identify problems and needs • design an experiment, plan or model that systematically defines a problem • special needs or problems • formulate questions relevant to clarifying a particular problem, topic or issue ™ COMMUNICATION SKILLS: ability to… • listen with objectivity and paraphrase the content of a message • use various forms and styles of written communication • speak effectively to individuals and groups • use media formats to present ideas imaginatively • express one's needs, wants, opinions and preferences without offending the sensitivities of others • identify and communicate value judgments effectively • describe objects or events with a minimum of factual errors • convey a positive self-image to others 17™ HUMAN RELATIONS AND INTERPERSONAL SKILLS: ability to… • keep a group "on track" and moving toward the achievement of a common goal • maintain group cooperation and support • delegate tasks and responsibilities • interact effectively with peers, superiors and subordinates • express one's feeling appropriately • understand the feelings of others • use argumentation techniques to persuade others • make commitments to persons • be willing to take risks • teach a skill, concept or principle to others • analyze behavior of self and others in group situations • demonstrate effective social behavior in a variety of settings and under different circumstances • work under time and environmental pressures ™ CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS: ability to … • identify quickly and accurately the critical issues when making a decision or solving a problem • identify a general principle that explains interrelated experiences or factual data • define the parameters of a problem • identify reasonable criteria for assessing the value of appropriateness of a action or behavior • adapt one's concepts and behavior to changing conventions and norms • apply appropriate criteria to strategies and action plans • take given premises and reason to their conclusion • create innovative solutions to complex problems • analyze the interrelationships of events and ideas from several perspectives ™ MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION SKILLS: ability to … • analyze tasks • identify people who can contribute to the solution of a problem or task • identify resource materials useful in the solution of a problem • identify one's own values • motivate and lead people • organize people and tasks to achieve specific goals ™ VALUING SKILLS: ability to … • assess a course of action in terms of its long-range effects on the general human welfare • make decisions that will maximize both individual and collective good • appreciate the contributions of art, literature, science, and technology to contemporary society • identify one's own values • assess one's values in relation to important life decisions 18™ PERSONAL/CAREER DEVELOPMENT SKILLS: ability to … • analyze and learn from life experiencesboth one's own and other's • relate the skills developed in one environment (e.g. school) to the requirements of another environment (e.g. work) • match knowledge about one's own characteristics and abilities to information about job or career opportunities • identify, describe and assess the relative importance of one's needs, values, interest, strengths and weaknesses • develop personal growth goals that are motivating • identify and describe skills acquired through formal education and general life experience • identify one's own strengths and weaknesses • accept and learn from negative criticism • persist with a project when faced with failure unless it is clear that the project cannot be carried out or is not worth the time or effort needed to complete it • recognize when a project cannot be carried out or is not worth the time or effort required to complete it • generate trust and confidence in others • take risks • accept the consequences of one's actions • "market" oneself to prospective employers Source/Paul Breen and Urban Whitaker Copyright 1982 - copyright permission 19